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The Yellow~Ribbons Project - Quilters who care

Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2002 23:22:48 EST F

Hi all; I need a quilt appraiser or textile conservator in the Lancaster, PA area. Any ideas? Thanks, Darwin

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Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 08:39:10 EST From: 

 i think lynn hit the "nail on the head"...with making sure about a return policy(in writing)... .i'm not an ebay kind of shopper...it sort of sounds like internet dating... the seller can describe the quilt/article in glowing terms..which may or may not be exactly the truth...sometimes.. not even close to the truth... it certainly sounds like a "buyer beware" kind of setup. jean ------------------------------ 

Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 08:38:07 -0600 From: "Lisa Erlandson" 

In response to the comments about ebay and fakes, repros, non-antiques, etc. - it really boils down to the same complaints that I have about antique malls. You have to dig through the repros and the beanie babies to find any real antiques in many malls. You just have to know your stuff and be very careful about what you look at. Contact the seller and ask very specific questions - you should be able to get a good feel about whether or not to bid on something. As I have read Xenia warn us many times here on QHL: "Buyer, beware" I would add - Buyer - educate thyself, it is no one else's duty to do so!! Good luck to all in the new year! Lisa ------------------------------ 

Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 14:34:39 -0700 From: "Sharon Harleman Tandy" 

Seems like a good time to let you all know....I'm back. Got Xd from the = list a couple months ago, got back on and have been lurking for a while. = Happy New Year to all QHLers and, note to friends, please feel free to e= -me personally to catch up. Sharon Harleman Tandy, Quilts & Answers, Boi= se, Idaho. ------

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Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 11:25:19 +1100 From: Lorraine Olsson 
 Hi All, It was this time last week that I last wrote about the fires, so here is my update. Firstly, Ruth, who is in a burnt area, is well and safe as is her home. I am in the upper mountains and the fire is still between here and Sydney. I believe another 20 homes were lost last night further down the coast. We have been so lucky here to have had no physical sense of the fire. The wind is blowing them away from us so far. The smoke fills the horizon to the east, but we do not even smell it. 

I had to do something, so I have spent the last 6 days in at the local fire HQ, running the kitchen. They were calling for volunteers, so off I went. Today I am having a break, and spending time with my grandson. We have fire-fighters from every state in Australia with us now. A contingent of New Zealanders has arrived too. I have to say I get very moved at the generosity of spirit that is being shown from all corners. At this time I believe we have more than 2000 extra helpers on the ground. These are not just tough men , but women, and young people as well. 

I have been feeding kids as young as 18 through to old fellas in their 60s, young girls from 18 through to again, older ladies , with many in between. This is said to be the worst fire season in living history. The home losses are almost 200 in number, but as yet no lives have been lost. This is a small miracle in itself , as you will realise if you see (on TV), the size of the fires that are being fought. The fire worming it's way into the centre of the city is threatening thousands, and they have a large helicopter, making water bombing runs over the worst of the fire. Smaller choppers are also making water drops. It must be really frightening to be so threatened. Please keep our people in your thoughts Happy New Year to you all, Lorraine in Oz

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Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 08:37:38 -0500 From: "Pam Weeks Worthen" 

Happy New Year to all! A Steering Committee has been formed to revive/continue/start anew the New Hampshire Quilt Documentation Project that was begun approximately 15 years ago, and has been dormant for about 10 years. (I am the newbie to the group and we go to our first formal meeting with the chair of the original group on Saturday, so my dates could be a little off) If anyone on this list had anything to do with the early efforts in New Hampshire, I'd love to hear from them. We are also compiling information about other state projects, and as we refine our goals, finish work on organizational structure, etc, we would really appreciated hints, tips, "I wish we had done it differently" sort of advice. My burning issues are: 

1) data base to use--is the one being used by the "National Registry" available? 

2) the very best set of criteria to measure/compile/study--has anything been standardized? 

3) how many other state projects included quilts from public and private collections from OUTSIDE the state, when the quilt's provenance was known to be from that state? 

I believe I understand from my reading of the Connecticut Quilt Search book that they included Connecticut quilts owned by organizations or collectors from outside CT.. Thanks in advance for your help. We'll keep you posted on our progress as we ramp up this spring. Pam in NH where the skating is FABULOUS and I just hope my wrist guards keep working for my spectacular falls....just wish I could find my old hockey helmet! 

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Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 10:55:47 -0800 From: "Susan Wildemuth" 

Are their any more quilt-related Jeanette Lasansky books out there other than the ones I have listed: Lasansky, Jeannette, IN THE HEART OF PENNSYLVANIA: An Oral Traditions Project. University of Pennsylvannia Press, 1985 ISBN: 0-917127-00-5 LCCN: 84-29585. Lasansky, Jeannette, PIECED BY MOTHER An Oral Traditions Project. University of Pennsylvannia Press, 1988 ISBN: 0-917127-03-X LCCN: 87-31272. Lasansky, Jeannette, BITS AND PIECES: TEXTILE TRADITIONS-An Oral Traditions Project. University of Pennsylvannia Press, 1991. ISBN: 0-81221362-9 LCCN:90-27530. Lasansky, Jeannette, ON THE CUTTING EDGE An Oral Traditions Project. University of Pennsylvannia Press, 1994 ISBN: 0-917127-08-0 LCCN: 93-46431. Thanks-Sue 

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Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 12:07:14 -0600 From: Xenia Cord 

My collection of Lasansky books includes 2 books by J. Lasansky: In the Heart of Pennsylvania, 19th and 20th Century Quiltmaking Traditions - 1985 Pieced By Mother, Over 100 Years of Quiltmaking Traditions - 1987 And 4 books edited by her, with multiple contributors: In the Heart of Pennsylvania, Symposium Papers - 1986 Pieced By Mother, Symposium Papers - 1988 Bits and Pieces, Textile Traditions - 1991 On the Cutting Edge, Textile Collectors, Collections, and Traditions - 1994 Full citations available on request <g>! Xenia 

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Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 17:52:15 -0500 From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" 

There is another book by Jeannette which has a little about quilts but is not entirely about quilts - A Good Start: The Aussteier or Dowry, 1990. This is also part of the Oral Traditions series. This covers many of the items a PA German woman would have needed to start housekeeping - a very interesting book and worth adding to your Lasansky collection!

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Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 23:34:57 -0900 From: "Gloria Hanrahan" 

New to the group and I was reviewing the archieves so I wouldn't ask = about previously discussed issues. I found some postings on quilt appraisal (I'm wanting to go in this = direction within the next year and am trying to find training or = mentoring). I found two posts answering questions, but couldn't get the = archives to allow me to go back farther than 6/29/98. The original = question must have been within a week or so earlier. Any suggestions to get to those earlier posts? Thanks, Gloria Hanrahan=20 in very cold, dark and snowy Anchorage, Alaska ------

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Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2002 08:38:22 -0500 From: Beth Donaldson 

Dear Pam, Here are some answers to your questions. My burning issues are: 

1) data base to use--is the one being used by the "National Registry" available? The "National Registry" is the Quilt Index which is still being developed. The closest form available to that one is the one being used for the Michigan Quilt Project at the Great Lakes Quilt Center at the MSU Museum. You can print our form from this site: http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/MQP%20form The database we are using at the Michigan Quilt Project is Filemaker Pro 4.0. However the Quilt Index is being developed by H-Net/Matrix at Michigan State University. They are computer experts (way beyond my abilities) and I know their program is much more sophisticated than my Filemaker. The important thing to remember is that whatever database you choose, make sure it has easy import-export features and that the database can add or delete new fields as your work progresses. 

2) the very best set of criteria to measure/compile/study--has anything been standardized? I don't know that standardized is the best way to look at it. What is being worked out on the Quilt Index now is a basic format that will also allow for regional differences. I'm sure there are styles of quilts from other states that we in Michigan haven't seen or thought of. We need to accommodate new fields as we continue our work. We would love for anyone involved in any other state documentation projects to send us a copy of the form they are using or have used. I can then forward them to the Quilt Index people. We have forms from only about 10 other states now and would welcome more! 

3) how many other state projects included quilts from public and private collections from OUTSIDE the state, when the quilt's provenance was known to be from that state? I can only speak for Michigan and we do have a few quilts that do not live in this state, but have a strong Michigan provenance. Many of the quilts in our database were not made in Michigan but were brought to Michigan by family members. We usually don't turn down any quilt that is brought to our documentation days. (The next one is March 16, 2002 at the MSU Museum auditorium, e-mail me for more info!) If we're uncertain whether they can be entered into our database, we tell the quilt owner that, but document the quilt and just put a note on it. I'm sure there will be some issues with duplicate quilts in the Quilt Index once many states get entered, so again our database needs to be flexible enough to solve that problem when it arises. Thanks for opening this discussion! Beth Donaldson 
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Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 06:57:32 -0800 (PST) From: Kris Driessen 

Unfortunately, I lost those when my hard drive crashed. If anyone has any digests from 1/98 to 5/98 or so they would like to send me, I would be delighted to put them on line. By the way, use of the archives is restricted to paid members. I hate to do that, but it does cost about $35 a month to maintain that site. I pay for it with donations and book sales from the QuiltHistory.com site. Thanks, Kris

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Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2002 00:23:50 EST From: 

You all need to rush out and buy McCall's Quilting Magazine - Feb. 2002. It has a great article on pages 56 & 57 by our very own Xenia Cord about our very own Teddy Pruett. The title is....Uniquely Humorous: The Quilts of Teddy Pruett. Xenia did a super job of presenting to the quilt world a truly unique person/quilte- Teddy Pruett. I can't say more....Xenia did it perfectly and I don't want to mess it up. Run quickly to your local bookstore, grocery, whatever to buy this magazine. A little side note..... I discovered today that my chintz strippy quilt had had restoration performed upon it at some time----a very unique method----scotch tape had been used to hold the splitting chintz together on the underside. Thank goodness I bought this as a study piece. I learned something new for I had never seen such a method used. Hope I don't see it again. Now I have to scan the entire quilt to see if there are additional repairs using this method. I found 4 squares so far. We got 3-4 inches of snow over the past 2 days. We all had a great time playing in it! I served my children's friends snow cream and they loved it. They all had parents of Northern lineage so they didn't have a clue what I was talking about. I remember living in Mass. in 1981 and making snow cream. We almost died with the 1st bite. We didn't know about acid rain/snow....YUUUUUCK! Our snow is yummy... Good night to all, Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

 

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