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The Yellow~Ribbons Project - Quilters who care

Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 23:28:14 EST
From: MLEDevine@aol.com

Dear QHL members,
Been lurking and learning a lot from all of you. I have especially
enjoyed the Underground Railroad banter. If I may comment before I get to my question. Seems a bit pecuilar that slaves would have so many different quilts in their posession for signals.

Now for my question: I recently purchased from "Ebay" a set of 30s
applique patterns. The seller listed them as a reprint of a newspaper series. When I recieved them though they were nothing more than a photocopy of the patterns.
Is it legal to sell photocopies of a pattern. I thought that if one
were to copy contemporary patterns and sell them one would find oneself in need of a lawyer.

Does anyone know how far back copyright protection goes back? If she can sell the copies then what is to stop me from doing the same. (Not that I would though.)

Many thanks from the Big Apple.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 07:38:40 -0800
From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobins@fhcrc.org>

When a couple people on the list first mentioned newspapers being
printed on wallpaper, I thought it was a ludicrous myth. All I could
see in my mind was the mess and the small scraps you get when you
strip wallpaper.
Then I suddenly realized that it was *unused* wallpaper. <g>
Sheepishly,
Laura in Seattle, where we can go several years without snow, but had
some yesterday the first day of spring.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 13:15:52 -0600
From: Gary Parrett <gparret1@yahoo.com>

Hello,

Lynn, please forgive me, but I didn't catch the information on how
you
obtained your newspaper filled quilt or where it came from. That
would
be very interesting as its a long way from Rochester (just south of
Canada) to your home. Was that quilt made in the south? If so, how
did
they get hold of a Rochester newspaper? Interesting.
Do any of you know of anyone who has researched the quilt patterns
in
the Underground quilt book? It would be worth the effort to try to
find
documented evidence of where and when these patterns came into being.
The patterns used in the book would need to predate the civil war and
be
prevalent through the eastern states. I find it interesting that in
the
museum in which I work, the log cabin quilts are wool and silk
handsewn
to foundation fabric and were made probably 1860's or later. There
are
several that fit this category.(Sometimes we call wool ones "old
sneezers" because they have that reaction on our noses.). I don't
find
any so far that fit the time frame necessary to be used by those
harboring run-away slaves.
On a different topic, we are working with a redwork quilt, full size,
which comemorates the Spanish-American war. Some of the blocks in the
quilt are typical redwork patterns, but most of them deal with war,
President McKinley and then VP Hobart, the sinking of the Maine, Adm.
Dewey's home and more. One square has us baffled. In the center of
the
square is a canoe on the side of which is the word "Ontario". Seated
in
the boat are three people. The one at the right is a man dressed from
that time period. He reminds me of pictures of T. Roosevelt. In the
center is a man dressed in a native costume playing a guitar-like
instrument, perhaps a mandolin. On the left is a woman, also in some
type of native dress with her hands thrown up as if to ward of f
something. Her face is averted to the left, away from the men. At
the
top of the square, above the persons in the canoe are the words, "Out
of
tune". Our thoughts have been that "Ontario" could refer to the
great
lake, to the Indian tribe, to the province of Canada of said name.
Obviously something is not right, perhaps politically. Does anyone
know
about what was going on at that time period concerning "Ontario"?
Your
thoughts would be very welcome. We have been searching, but have not
come up with anything significant yet.
Karen

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 17:40:31 -0800
From: donbeld <donbeld@pacbell.net>

The South has some raw cotton during the end stages of the Civl War, but =
not as much as the North. My reference to newpaper batting used in =
place of cotton was from my research on the article I wrote for AQS,
=
unfortunately, AQS did not print my footnotes or bibliography and the
=
computer I had the article on crash and I lost all my files. If
someone =
really wants to know the reference, let me know and I will go back
over =
my hand notes to recapture it.

We must also remember that after the War the South was devastated by
the =
War and many of the previous slaves that worked in the cotton
factories =
refused to do so for an number of years, so production was very low
and =
the depression lasted for quite a few years.

I think a genuine Southern Civil War quilt with paper batting would
be a national treasure--just as the U.S. Sanitary Commission quilts are. My contacts so far show only four known Sanitary Commission quilts, two in public domain at the A.K. Smiley Library/Lincoln Shrine in Redlands, California and one in the DAR Museum in Washington, D.C. The DAR also has what I think probably was an Opportunity Quilt that was  made for the Brooklyn Sanitary Fair, but I don't think it was ever intended to go to the war front with a soldier.

Isn't all this so fascinating. Don Beld

 

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 21:19:09 -0500
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>

I was interested in Teddy's comment regarding her Civil War program
that "guilds just want to have fun." We (kindred spirits and I) have
been talking about how few members of our guild share our interest in quilt history. There are just over 100 members of our guild, and, while most of them will sit still for an historically oriented program if it's heavy on the entertainment angle, there are only three of us who are serious about the study of vintage quilts and textiles. I'd like to
know about other guilds.

Cinda on the Eastern Shore discovering hitherto unknown shades of
yellow in the garden we inherited when we bought this house

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 20:44:45 -0800
From: "Laurie Magee & Tom Blajeski" <woodman@vbe.com>

I actually no longer belong to a guild because the programs were
flavor of
the month and the meetings drove me nuts. I attend when there is
something substantive offered or if I'm invited to do a program. I
do
intend to advertise to see if there are others with similar interests
to
mine for a study group. Laurie

------------------------------


From: Cinda Cawley <lrcawley@dmv.com>
To: Teddy Pruett <Aprayzer@hotmail.com>; QHL@cuenet.com; Judy Kelius

I was interested in Teddy's comment regarding her Civil War program
that
"guilds just want to have fun." We (kindred spirits and I) have
been
talking about how few members of our guild share our interest in
quilt
history. There are just over 100 members of our guild, and, while
most of
them will sit still for an historically oriented program if it's
heavy on
the entertainment angle, there are only three of us who are serious
about
the study of vintage quilts and textiles. I'd like to know about
other
guilds. Cinda on the Eastern Shore discovering hitherto unknown
shades of
yellow in the garden we inherited when we bought this house

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2002 15:14:51 +0000
From: deedadik@att.net

Hi All, I am relatively new to the list and have an
interest in quilt history, dating, preservation. I have
been appraising quilts for three years and was certified
last year. I also do lectures on quilt dating to guilds
and historical societies.

I have found that guilds have personalities just like
people. Three of the four guilds in town have had me
present but the fourth (my own guild) wouldn't do it.
This guild has had some historical programs over the
past ten years that I have been a member and the
reaction seems to be the same-"I have heard historical
stuff once in my lifetime, so I don't need to hear
more". The other guilds and the historical societies
have been very receptive to the talk. Anxious to hear
what any of your experiences are in this area. Dee

--

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2002 11:25:22 -0500
From: "judygrow" <judygrow@rcn.com>

My guild is one of 2 that covers the entire county. The other guild,
the
first to be formed, meets weekday mornings at the public library.
My guild
meets on Sunday evening at a Masonic Lodge, and we have the building
for the
entire day, so most months there are daytime workshops scheduled on
meeting
day. Our membership is somewhat younger than the other guild --
however I
could definitely qualify for membership in the other one now. ;-)

My observation over 13 years is that the only time that members stay
through
the entire speaker presentation is when there is a trunk show of some
kind,
any kind. The highest attendance was for a fairly local collector
who
lugged over 30 19th century applique quilts to show us. What a
night that
was!

Usually folks start slipping out early, especially when there are
slide
shows. If our program committee finds out about another local
collector or
speaker with the "goods" in hand, there will be no problem booking
them!
Our group wants to see and handle the real goods, new or old.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2002 15:26:50 EST
From: KareQuilt@aol.com

I have just started to offer quilt history oriented lectures in the
past year
here in the Virginia-Maryland area, only I weave the quilt history
around the
personal stories of the makers of the quilts in my collection. (I
have both
family and non-family quilts in my small collection.)

I do think artifacts are a big factor in holding a guild audience. I
eventually also hope to offer a slide show lecture about the Honorees
in The
Quilters Hall of Fame. I don't have quilts made by the Honorees to
share,
but I plan to take binders of collected paper ephemera and show some
slides.
As I can afford it, I will try to find quilts made from patterns
designed by
some of the Honorees, but that is a big "if" at this point. And of
course,
not all Honorees in QHF actually made quilts, so I am back to paper
ephemera.
It remains to be seen how well it is received if I have no actual
"living"
quilts to show. <g>

Karen B. Alexander

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2002 16:48:56 -0500
From: "pepper cory" <pepcory@mail.clis.com>

Hello from the sunny but cold Carolina coast-The conundrum of
offering
what's currently popular as guild program fare (the 'flavor of the
month'
approach as opposed to a more substantive topic-) is faced by all who
labor
in this field. For myself, when possible I bring tons of quilts and
line
them up enticingly along the edge of the stage or tables and then
give my
20-25 minute talk. They don't get to see the quilts until they've
listened.
Guess that's the carrot-on-the-stick method! In some lectures I show
slides
but some folks will always doze off in the warm darkness. Am
threatening to
do a "mime lecture." No words, no microphone. You just hold quilts up
and
show them. Most guilds would be just as happy! In one talk, I poke
fun at
quilters' reticence to read text until they've sucked the very marrow
out of
the color photos. "Text, " I say, "You know, the little black marks
under
the pictures..." The line always gets a laugh. Cheers-
Pepper

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2002 21:34:57 -0500
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>

I wasn't in an "ain't it awful" mood when I commented on how few
quilters share our interest. I was pretty sure when I posed the
question
that the Bayside Quilters were typical in their indifference. I
don't take
it personally. After all I have absolutely no interest in "Stack and
Whack"
or "Block of the Month."
When I lecture I bring lots of quilts and I try to be funny.
Whatever
it takes to sugar coat the lesson and keep the audience awake. I've
always
loved history because what really happened is always more interesting
than
anything you could make up (except for Harry Potter, Lord of the
Rings,
Dickens and Trollope).
Cinda on the Eastern Shore

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 20:44:45 -0800
From: "Laurie Magee & Tom Blajeski" <woodman@vbe.com>

I actually no longer belong to a guild because the programs were
flavor of
the month and the meetings drove me nuts. I attend when there is
something substantive offered or if I'm invited to do a program. I
do
intend to advertise to see if there are others with similar interests
to
mine for a study group. Laurie

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 20:54:01 -0800
From: "Laurie Magee & Tom Blajeski" <woodman@vbe.com>

I wish to also thank all of those who made this seminar so
unforgettable.
I must say the 3 1/2 hours on the tarmac in Harrisburg waiting for
them to
deice the plane and clear the runway did not dim the enjoyment of the
two
preceding days. I finally made it back home after midnight, only 5
hours
late! Looking forward to next year. Laurie

 

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