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The Yellow~Ribbons Project - Quilters who care

Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 16:01:40 +0000
From: deedadik@att.net

Hi all, When my partner, Molly, and I do our lectures,
we also bring along 15-20 quilts and tops from 1830 to
the present. This seems to appeal to everyone and adds
visual to the "history lesson".

We also have come to the conclusion that some of you
have spoken to: we need to have study groups
specifically for the history buffs. We are also finding
that the guilds go through cycles of interest depending
upon how long they have been in existance. People get
tired of fluff, sometimes. Dee in Ohio

--
Dee Dadik
Amer. Quilter's Society
Certified Appraiser of Quilted
Textiles
5689 Concord Hill Dr.
Columbus, Ohio 43213
614-861-0478

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 09:06:04 -0800
From: Nancy Manning <nemanning@chartermi.net>

Hi Everyone--

I have seen statistics for quilt book publication/sales in the past
number in the past, but I've forgotten where I've seen it. Can
anyone
help me with this? You may reply to me off-list.
Thanks,
Nancy in sunny, but cold Michigan

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 19:18:12 -0500
From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdoc@sover.net>

Although the Amherst, Mass guild has the core group of women working
on
state documentation in western Mass, quilt history is still an
interest of
the minority. But is is not unusual to come to a guild meeting and
see a
reproduction style quilt being assembled in the corner for a special
event
or someone showing friends a 'new' antique top they just were given.

But real history, not just looking at a lovely old fabric or an
attractive
antique quilt...maybe a tenth of the group. Remember this is the
group that
has been visiting museums and historical societies studying quilts,
so I
think this may be a higher percentage than the norm. The project has
been
talked up and we seem to have ample volunteers.

In the last two years, I recall no programs of any historical
content. They
are 'how-to' programs.

Teddy, I would love to read your paper. Are you planning to publish
it
anywhere? The topic doesn't seem to lend itself to one of your quilt
creations...or does it?

Jan, who spent 6 hours singing today in an old brick community center
set
high on a hill, with a tall steeple, wide plank floors, huge windows
of old
wavy glass which overlooked the Green Mountains (very white today)
and I can
barely speak but have a peaceful feeling in my heart.

--
Jan Drechsler in Vermont
Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher
www.sover.net/~bobmills

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 20:50:25 -0500
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilter@alltel.net>

The local guild in Ocala, FL seems to be one that celebrates antique
quilts
and information about them. Just last Thursday night I presented a
program
on quilt history. In addition to the informational part of the
program and
the quilts I had to illustrate my talk, we had a show & tell of
members'
vintage quilts. So I echo Judy's thoughts that the more quilts the
better.
The program was especially fun for me because I had not seen all of
the
quilts. This meant that viewing them was a pleasant surprise for all
of us.
Having many speakers also broke up the program so it wasn't just me
up
there. This guild also entertained a recent visit from Teddy P. and
were
enthused and excited by it. Several members showed the same kind of
"Goodwill store finds" that she included in her presentation. A
couple of
the quilts had been appraised by her. Also, a Grandmother's Flower
Garden
that was purchsed inexpensively somewhere in Georgia (I think) had a
label
from the Indiana quilt documentation project affixed to the back. I
thought
it was a fun evening and was glad so many members were "into" vintage
quilts. Some had not seen the sheet when people signed up for
bringing
quilts and said they have several at home. It sounds like another
program to
me! Regards, Nancy Roberts

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 08:44:19 -0500
From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com>

 

Dear all,
I have been following the thread about the interest - or lack of
same
- for history in the various quilds.
The exact same situation exists in the "re-enactor" groups. These
are
the folks who participate in the regiments who re-enact French and
Indian War, Revolutionary War, or Civil War battles. A friend of
mine
and I have been lecturing on historic costume using her collection of
period garments. We have found the same ambiguity towards the social
history/regional aspect/ and authenticity that you all describe in
the
guilds.
The minority is truely interested in the "real" history. The others
just play at it and take what is convenient or is easy. In the
regiments there are also the 'extremists' - those who dictate what
can
and can not be worn with no real understanding of the period and the
clothes. The petty politics power in these regiments blow me away!
I suspect that some of this has to do with a lack of intellectual
curiosity. It takes real work to understand all of the various
components that go into achieving a real understanding of an
historical
period. As a society we tend to get comfortable with the myths and
misunderstandings of "real" history. Old habits and notions die
hard!
So we need to guard this site - kindred spirits all.
Best,
Newbie Richardson

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 09:37:52 EST
From: Kittencat3@aol.com

And here in the SCA we always thought the Civil War groups were the
authenticity fanatics...:)

Seriously, I think you'll find the same attitude in virtually every
re-enactment group. Some are there for fun, some are there for
living
history, and some are there to try to dictate standards to others.
Most are
there for some combination of the above....

Lisa Evans

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 14:16:25 -0500
From: Vivien Lee Sayre <vsayre@nesa.com>

Jan and All,

The Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project-West,
(MassQuilts-West), as
Jan has stated, does have a group derived from the Amherst Guild. But
the
project as a whole, whether MassQuilts-East or West draws from a
volunteer
base of many different guilds, historians, artists, curators, and
those who
just have a love of textiles and interest in history. As one of the
founding mothers of MassQuilts, continued member of the Steering
Committee
and documentor, it is easy for me to think the world revolves around
antique quilts. We all know this is not so and realize that antique
quilts
is just one aspect of the broader world of quilting and textiles, and
for
that matter, life in general.

However, I wish to correct a misconception. There are lectures and
programs
offered throughout Massachusetts on a regular basis. For example:
The New
England Quilt Museum offers guided tours and lectures of its
exhibits.There
are regular lectures at the American Textile History Museum on the
history
of textiles, the most recent on Mill Girls. There is a yearly
seminar
held by Textile Talks in Malden which covers different aspects of
textiles
including dyes, printing methods, etc. The Museum of Our National
Heritage
in Lexington also has periodic exhibits and lectures. The two most
recent
were of the James Collection and Odd Fellow/Masonic Quilts. In
addition,
there have been lectures on 1930's quilts by Beverly Dunivent at the
New
England Quilt Museum, East Coast Quilters Alliance and historical
groups. I
have lectured extensively on quilt history, color, pattern, designs
and
textiles, not only to guilds and historical societies, but also at
New
England Images Quilt Show. Also, MassQuilts just finished a day of
lectures
at Old Sturbridge Village, and many guilds through the state offer
lectures
during their quilt shows as well as guild meetings. This is only the
tip of
the iceberg in Massachusetts and has not taken into consideration
what is
occurring throughout New England in general.

From my own experience, I find that people stay to the end of my
lectures
even though they thought they were not particularly interested in
quilt
history. I bring over two hundred years of quilts and explain how the
quilts we are making today, in many cases, have their roots in
history. To
borrow a phrase from JoAnne Parisi, "Old is New". The quilts I bring
can be
handled so people get a 'hands-on' lesson. This not only helps people
to
discover the world of antique quilts, but also to realize how special
the
quilts they are making or own can be.

So what does this all come down to? Well, from my perspective whether
documenting or lecturing, I see people developing new interests. I
see
people learning about a history that they can see, feel, touch, and
in some
cases, smell. (Sorry I had to include that.) I see people tucking
this away
because they never know when it will be useful. I see people asking
for
more information about quilt history, and most of all, I see people
who
remember something from their past that they hadn't thought of for a
while.
It all works whether you own quilts, want to collect antique quilts
or just
look at them.

I hope this is of help to you Jan, and anyone else who was wondering
about
MassQuilts and quilt history lectures. If you have any questions
please
don't hesitate to be in contact.

Vivien Sayre (still waiting for that Nor'easter!)


At 07:18 PM 3/23/2002 -0500, you wrote:
> QHL <QHL@cuenet.com>

Although the Amherst, Mass guild has the core group of women working
on
state documentation in western Mass, quilt history is still an
interest of
the minority. But is is not unusual to come to a guild meeting and
see a
reproduction style quilt being assembled in the corner for a special
event
or someone showing friends a 'new' antique top they just were given.

But real history, not just looking at a lovely old fabric or an
attractive
antique quilt...maybe a tenth of the group. Remember this is the
group that
has been visiting museums and historical societies studying quilts,
so I
think this may be a higher percentage than the norm. The project has
been
talked up and we seem to have ample volunteers.

In the last two years, I recall no programs of any historical
content. They
are 'how-to' programs.

Teddy, I would love to read your paper. Are you planning to publish
it
anywhere? The topic doesn't seem to lend itself to one of your quilt
creations...or does it?

Jan, who spent 6 hours singing today in an old brick community center
set
high on a hill, with a tall steeple, wide plank floors, huge windows
of old
wavy glass which overlooked the Green Mountains (very white today)
and I can
barely speak but have a peaceful feeling in my heart.

--
Jan Drechsler in Vermont
Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher
www.sover.net/~bobmills

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 16:29:02 EST
From: Kittencat3@aol.com

One thing I noticed about the sites listed in Vivien's post: with
the
exception of Old Sturbridge Village, they're all east of Worcester,
and most
are north of Boston. I know that the New England Quilt Museum is in
Lowell,
but couldn't they have a lecture or two in the four western counties?
Historic Deerfield has a terrific collection of old quilts, and
Storrowton
Village in West Springfield is dedicated to the same time period as
OSV.

Lisa Evans
Easthampton, Mass
(suddenly feeling a tiny bit secessionist....)

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 13:40:12 -0800
From: "Jim and Alberta Word" <jword@west.net>

I am trying to place copies of the oral histories that were done
in Ventura County in our County Museum but need copies of the original releases. We hope to make the information available to more people than our local guild.
Can anyone tell me who has these releases and how I can get
copies?

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 20:14:07 -0500
From: Vivien Lee Sayre <vsayre@nesa.com>

Hey Linda,

Thank you for adding to the list of places to learn more about
antique
quilts and textiles in Massachusetts. That's what so great about this
list,
we share.

Vivien


At 04:29 PM 3/24/2002 -0500, you wrote:
>One thing I noticed about the sites listed in Vivien's post: with
the
>exception of Old Sturbridge Village, they're all east of Worcester,
and most
>are north of Boston. I know that the New England Quilt Museum is in
Lowell,
>but couldn't they have a lecture or two in the four western
counties?
>Historic Deerfield has a terrific collection of old quilts, and
Storrowton
>Village in West Springfield is dedicated to the same time period as
OSV.
>
>Lisa Evans
>Easthampton, Mass
>(suddenly feeling a tiny bit secessionist....)

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 21:39:10 -0500
From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdoc@sover.net>

Vivien,
The original thread referred to the amount of guild interest in
history,
v.s. project of the day.

Rereading my posting, I see how it could be misconstrued, but I meant
that I
recalled no history presentations to the Amherst GUILD in the last 2
or so
years. The folks brought in were workshop teachers. Hmmm, perhaps
it is
time to suggest to our guild committee that we ask you to present a
historical program with your 200 years of quilts!

Certainly, with all the quilt history activity in Lowell and other
museums
and exhibits, Massachusetts is one of the richer states in education
and
pure antique quilt Fun.

Jan
--

 

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