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The Yellow~Ribbons Project - Quilters who care

Date: Sun, 7 Jul 2002 19:27:26 -0700 (PDT)
From: Kris Driessen 

I received this note from Fawn Valentine as part of her teachers page
information. ( http://www.quilthistoryteachers.com  )  I thought y'all might be interested!

I teach college courses in quilt history for Mountain State
University's School of Extended and Distance Learning (Beckley, WV)
304/253-7351. The courses are ART 281 History of Quiltmaking in
Appalachia and ART 282 American Quilt History. These are basically
correspondence courses: when the student enrolls, she receives a set
of objective examinations to be completed at home, open-book. I have
students from all over the USA. Please contact me if you need more
information about the courses. The textbook for ART 281 is West
Virginia Quilts and Quiltmakers by me (this course also requires two
essays in addition to the exams); the textbook for ART 282 is Clues
in the Calico by Barbara Brackman. The Dean of the School of Extended
and Distance Learning is Dr. Mark Miller mmiller@mountainstate.edu
and he can provide registration information for your list. Mountain
State Universtiy has been very supportive of offering quilt history
courses for college credit. My goal is to have quilt history
recognized as an academic subject and I am doing all I can to bring
this goal to fruition. When I was in graduate school, I took art
classes in American architecture, painting, and furniture. I would
like to see quilts given the same respect.

Fawn Valentine
home phone 304/466-3996

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Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 08:48:07 -0400
From: "Sue McClure" <smcclure@nycap.rr.com>
I usually only lurk on this digest since I don't know very much about
antique
quilts or textiles (however, I am learning all kinds of things by
reading your
notes!) but I purchased a piece of fabric at a local flea market
yesterday that
I would love to learn a bit more about!

I believe this fabric is similar to an example that's on the top
right side of
p.95 in Barbara Brackman's "Clues in the Calico" even though that
material looks
like a dark fabric while mine is a light yellowish brown color.
Brackman dates
that quilt from the mid-19th century and that makes sense because the
note
attached to this piece says:

"Copper Plate (very old) A piece of a vallence that was on a quilt
that was my
Grandmother Young's and I'm now 78 years old (1928). Eliza Bird
Charles"

I was pleased to be able to date this piece so accurately (at least I
THINK I
have!), but I'm not sure just how this was meant to be used? Eliza
says it was a
"vallence" on her grandmother's quilt, but the only valences that I'm
familiar
with are those that go on WINDOWS! Did they also use them on quilts
or was she
mistaken?

Sue McClure

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 17:14:03 -0400
From: Palampore@aol.com

I never did report on my Hawaii trip. We had a fabulous time and I
loved the traditional quilts of Hawaii. We went to the Bishop Museum
in Honolulu where they have women quilting every day. The woman who
is Hawaiian and usually there had taken the 1st day off in a zillion
years on the day I was there. I still enjoyed seeing their work.
There were also several lovely quilts on exhibit.
(It would be nice to figure out a way to communicate with these
ladies and give them pictures of 1800's traditional applique done on the
mainland to compare the styles.)
I went to a fabric store that was to die for. I have looked and
looked for the address. Anyway....the have a website. I think if you
typed in "Hawaiian fabric store" it would come up. They have 3 stores.
Then...we went to the Aloha Stadium Swap Meet. That is the place to
buy all sorts of tourist presents, and tons of fabulous Hawaiian
flowered fabric. I was so proud of myself. I only bought 1 yd. and a
pillow kit to work on during the trip. Mainly I didn't buy much
because I was so overwhelmed. I wanted to buy it all!!!
While in Maui we went to the Hyatt and they had a lovely gift shop
there filled with quilts. I told the lady working there that a state
project was being worked on and she was very excited.
Many of the kits and quilts were made in Taiwan, but there were
plenty made by natives. It was interesting to see them and see where they
surely were influenced by the applique cut outs being done on the
mainland in the 1800's. I am restoring an applique now that Pepper Cory
says was probably a design cut by a traveling German peddler and sold
to the quilter. I can definitely see where there could be a
connection.

Now the signature quilt....I bought on Ebay a signature from the
1870's ish which was cut in half. Wonder if 2 sisters wanted the quilt
so they cut it into 2 pieces??? It is bound all around but names down
the middle are cut in half. The last names are: Sanger, Vaughn,
Hager, Webb, Williams, Frisbie, Henry, Totman, Larkins, Watson, Jersey,
Pattison, Culver, York, Bowen, etc. The most unusual part about it
is that most of the names are written in ink, in cursive, but at the
end of the names is a period on 90% of them. Who would write a name
and then put a period at the end of it????? Just curious to see if
anyone else has ever seen this.
Gotta run take Nora to a swim meet. The best part about them is that
during the long waits between races I get to read a book
uninterrupted.
Will any of you other than Newbie and I be at the Region VI Costume
Society of Amerian Symposium/Conference in Abington, VA July 19-21???
Let us know.
Off and running.....
Lynn Lancaster Gorges
New Bern, NC

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 02:04:51 +0000 From: "Anne Copeland" 

This sounds wonderful, Fawn, and it is definitely an idea whose time is long overdue, so I am so glad that you are doing this. I remember you from a long time ago when you gave a paper at the AQSG in Birmingham. Beverly Dunivent and I were there giving ours too. It sure is good to see you on line again, and congratulations on your endeavors. I hope that they are truly successful and I know that we will all benefit from your efforts. Love and light always, Annie

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 08:29:25 +0100 From: "Sally Ward" <Sally.D.Ward@btinternet.com> To: <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: 

<The most unusual part about it is that most of the names are written in ink, in cursive, but at the end of the names is a period on 90% of them. Who would write a name and then put a period at the end of it?????

I don't know about signatures on quilts, but most people I know if asked for a signature on paper would finish with a either a full stop or an underline, as a kind of flourish. Is that not the case in the US?

Sally W in Yorkshire, UK

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 08:25:46 -0500 From: "Dale/Jean Carlton" 

Yesterday Sue Mclure told about a piece she found at a flea market:

"Copper Plate (very old) A piece of a vallence that was on a quilt that was my Grandmother Young's and I'm now 78 years old (1928). Eliza Bird Charles"

I was pleased to be able to date this piece so accurately (at least I THINK I have!), but I'm not sure just how this was meant to be used? Eliza says it was a "vallence" on her grandmother's quilt, but the only valences that I'm familiar with are those that go on WINDOWS! Did they also use them on quilts or was she mistaken?

I looked in Brackman's book to see what you referred to. Back on p. 78 there is more info on copper plate printed fabric and that on 95 doesn't seem to be of that type - I have heard of valences on those big 4 poster beds ? Maybe that's what she meant.It's always a mystery, but fun to try to solve. I have found many pieces, quilts and fabrics, marked wrong at antique shops etc. Last week I saw a very traditional double wedding ring in1940's fabrics - no doubt about it......they are pretty easy to identify not to mention the design.... The tag said 1900.....WAY off. I mentioned it to the shop employee....she was glad to have the info and said the piece had been misrepresented to them by the seller.....if they don't deal specifically in textiles they don't know that much about quilts - IMHO!

Jean

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 10:12:25 -0400 From: "anne" 

I visited a shop in Honolulu about four years ago. Suspect this is the one mentioned by Lynn. Info then was: Fabric Mart, with shops also in Aiea and Kaneohe. They will mail order. Wonderful selection. Transpacific was one 'brand' name. Web and email: www.fmart.com , fmart@slider.net.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 14:44:47 -0400 From: tracy 

I'm planning a trip to England, we will drive from London up to the Lake District in late October. Any quilt or textile museums, shows, galleries or shops that we should know about?

Thank you, Tracy Jamar

 ------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 16:49:28 -0400 From: "Ilene Brown" 

HI, I searched Hawaiian Fabric Shop and came up with www.hawaiianfabrics.com I fell in love with their fabrics and order several yards, plus I chose one of the fabrics and I had them make a Hawaiian shirt out of it. Also, if you give them your email address they will email you a $5 off coupon to use on your first order. Most of their cottons were $5.95/yd, batiks $9/yd. And they have grab bags in half yd., fat qtr, and 12x12 sizes. Somebody hide my Visa, please. Ilene in Raleigh, NC ----- Original Message ----- From: anne <datkoa@erols.com> To: <QHL@cuenet.com> Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 10:12 AM Subject: QHL: Info on fabric shops in Hawaii

> I visited a shop in Honolulu about four years ago. Suspect this is the one > mentioned by Lynn. Info then was: Fabric Mart, with shops also in Aiea and > Kaneohe. They will mail order. Wonderful selection. Transpacific was one > 'brand' name. Web and email: www.fmart.com , fmart@slider.net. > > >

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 17:06:20 -0400 From: "Dee Stark" 

> I'm planning a trip to England, we will drive from London up to the Lake District in late >October. Any quilt or textile museums, shows, galleries or shops that we should know >about?

Can you please post to the list, if you have info?

I will be traveling to Lancaster and speaking and doing a workshop for the Lancaster Chapter of the Embroiderer's Guild on September 14. I think I'm going to fly in to London on the 9th or 10th, and hang around there a couple of days, then go up for several days in Lancaster before I go down to France to teach at the European Crazy Quilt Expo.

I know that if I do nothing else, I NEED to see the V&A. Other then that, my schedule is pretty flexible.

Does anyone know if the BritRail pass is good on the tube? I'm trying to find the most economical way to do all this......

dee

Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:58:39 +1000 From: Lorraine Olsson 

Hi Dee, I received this site address the other day. I posted it to another group and had a report back that it is a wonderful place to visit. www.bowesmuseum.org.uk

Lorraine in Oz

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 08:29:12 +0100 From: "Sally Ward" 

An early morning slip-of-the-keyboard meant I posted to the British History List my comment about the signature quilt by mistake, before re-posting correctly to QHL. However, it elicited the following which may be of interest.

Sally W in UK

> Sally, > 1)My father writes that way. Makes a list of names and puts a period > after each name. He was born and educated in Denmark. Born in 1914 with a > strong penmanship education. He couldn't understand why we didn't have > penmanship classes into high school the way he did. He has a beautiful > hand and wonderful signature. > 2) I work at Mystic Seaport, a maritime museum in Connecticut. USA- Many > old wooden carved name boards for vessels have a period at the end of the > ship's name. These are carefully laid out to fit and the layout is made > with room for the period included. > Why? I don't know. > Hope my clues can help. > > Tora Sterregaard

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 09:08:03 +0100 From: "Sally Ward" 

The Bowes Museum indeed has some wonderful quilts, but they are not usually on display and for a privately arranged view with the Curator I believe there is now a standard fee of around UKP50. In the same area is the Beamish museum, which is a large open-air museum with quilts on beds in cottages etc. Again, to really get to see them you need to contact the curator, or else time your visit for one of their special quilting weekends. And there are national-size quilt shows in Harrogate in September and November.

Also in the North of England is the Quilters Guild of the British Isles Heritage collection, held in Halifax. There is always a small display, but if you pre-book (it has to be a Thursday) you can either have a group visit or an individual study visit for which a selection of quilts will be brought out of store. There is a very reasonable charge for that. The Guild also have their tri-annual juried exhibition of members' work there until September. Unfortunately their website is not in operation at the moment, but should be back on with information before October (we all sincerely hope <G>)

I would also suggest that before your visit you join either the general-interest British list BQL at Yahoo (empty email to BQL-subscribe@yahoogroups.com ) which has a wide membership base, and/or the smaller history-based BQHL (BQHL-subscribe@yahoogroups.com). If you tell the members there where you will be travelling, you should receive information about what shows are on in the area.

Sally Ward in UK

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 10 Jul 02 12:05:08 -0600 From: woodford 

Perhaps this "vallence" piece was used to cover the top (or head) of the quilt to keep it clean. Usually the tops (heads) wore faster because of faces and hands and beards. I have seen a quilt with just such a strip on the top.

Barbara Woodford

Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 22:59:31 -0800 From: mopalka 

In regard to the Hawaiian fabric, I found beautiful, quilt quality fabric at the Hyatt on Maui. There used to be a shop called Maui Quilts, but unfortunately it is now out of business. I will look for the e-mail for the Hyatt Quilt Shop. Susan(in Alaska)

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 09:49:24 -0400 From: Newbie Richardson 

Dear all, It is very common to see "furnishing" textiles from the late 18th and early 19th century recycled into quilts. I have seen at least two dozen quilts from the first half of the 19th c that had pieces of old draperies and bed hangings incorporated into the spread. I seem to think that there are a few pictured in the Calico and Chinz catalog. The custom of bed draping continued until well into the 19th century. (see "At Home": the American Family 1750 -1870 by Elizabeth Garrett, Abrams 1990 ISBN #0-8109-1894-3 and "Bed Hangings": A Treatise on Fabrics and Styles in the Curtaining of Beds 1650-1850, Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, 1961&1969 (no ISBN #) Many of the printed fabrics used were very expensive and high end - so it was logical to recycle them into smaller pieces. The copper plate toiles (later the style was copied onto rollers and printed throughout the 19th century) were extremely stylish. You need a biggish piece of the toile and a practiced eye to tell the difference between a copper plate and a roller printed version. Newbie

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 14:48:07 EDT From: Hazelmacc@aol.com To: 

If you would like to see the "earliest English patchwork' you must go to Levens Hall & Gardens, Kendal, near Windermere, off M6. They have a quilt, curtains and bed hangings in this wonderful fabric, some of it is 17th century Indian chintz and family history says it is circa 1708. They also have a wonderful topiary garden, "best examples still intact in its original design". They as well have a small steam engine collection. The delightful Bagot family lives in the house.

If you get near York, the York Castle has period rooms -- delightful place to visit.

Hazel Carter who has visited these areas several times but not within the last five years, so hopefully everything is in its place.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 18:15:22 -0500 From: "Dale/Jean Carlton" 

I have been following the conversation about periods after names. I just found a quilt in one of my books, dated 1885 and there is a period appliqued ( a big square) after every word. Her name, C. Winnie. on one end Crazy.City. 1885. on the other! It says it was found in New York state....wild. Has anyone else see this one? There's a crazy patch section in the middle, houses on each long side and stars, flying geese, 60 degree diamonds.... described as Unconventional approach. :) Jean

te: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 20:32:52 +0000 From: "Karen Bush" Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

all for your help on this silk log cabin. My email (hotmail) is really acting up, so, I've been 'bouncing' all over the place. Just thought I'd post to the lists while I can still do That! grrr... We're getting my Mom moved this week and weekend, wouldn't ya know, HOTTEST week in history for this time of year, over l00 and 70% humidity, but, we're getting it done. Soon as I get back home and settled (hopefully), I'll show you a picture of the quilt. I'm looking for a deep raspberry for the backing to match the centers. NO pressure there! haha... Again, thanks, and I'll get back in the groove Shortly, I hope! ;) kb

 
 
 

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