Quilt History banner

""
""

Home Page

""

Archives

 

Appraisers

 

Articles

 
 
 
 
Dating  

Member Links

 
Study Groups  

Subscribe

 

Teachers

 

 

 

The Yellow~Ribbons Project - Quilters who care


Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2002 05:50:11 -0700 (PDT)
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com>

> 1) it speeds your insurance settlement.

Hiya-
I am not a homeowner, so am not familiar with
homeowners insurance. I DO know that if you have an
especially valuable quilt, you may have to attach a
rider to your policy. I know a quilter who made a
quilt that won a third place in Paducah. Her quilt
was valued at $30,000, and their regular policy would
not have covered this quilt.
That quilt was not an antique, but would a collection
of antique quilts be treated the same as paintings?
Perhaps some of the dedicated collectors out there
could shed some light on this.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 04 Aug 2002 10:39:40 -0400
From: Kevin Champ <kchamp@nrtco.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com

Our insurance agent recommended taking photos of each room, each closet,
all the stuff in the garage and so on...then getting the photos
developed on disk and keeping them in a safe deposit box at the bank.
Not everything had to be on photos, but they would at least trigger
your memory about some of the things you have...it would be fairly easy
to keep current at least for some and cheap to do.
Also, for large ticket items....sewing machines, computers and
jewellry...they keep a photocopy of the receipt in their file...I am
thinking that would work for quilt valuations?? Keep a photocopy in a
safety deposit box or on file at the insurance company.
I am thinking that real big items like a quilt valued at $30,000
would require something special like someone else mentioned...
Val

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2002 12:02:34 -0400
From: "Dee Stark" <dee@nf2g.com>
To: "Judy Schwender" <sister3603@yahoo.com>

> > 1) it speeds your insurance settlement.

> I am not a homeowner, so am not familiar with
> homeowners insurance. I DO know that if you have an

Please tell me that you have renter's insurance then. Functions the same
way - except renter's is just on contents, while homeowner's generally have
two sections - or sometimes two seperate policies - one on contents, one on
the structure.

> That quilt was not an antique, but would a collection
> of antique quilts be treated the same as paintings?
> Perhaps some of the dedicated collectors out there
> could shed some light on this.

Let's see if I can explain this so it makes sense. There are actually two
issues here - one is a household inventory, and another is the special
concerns when you have collections - of anything.

First, the household inventory. For instance, let's talk about a disaster
that would be my scenario - let's say the very large, very pretty tree
outside our apartment window decides to come crashing into our living room,
smashing the roof, during a huge storm. Let's hope the insurance company,
first, doesn't try to wiggle out of it saying it is an Act of God. Hmmmph.
That's another issue altogether!

Let's say this happens when Dave and I aren't home. Our living room is
flooded with rain water, the entertainment center is smashed beyond
recognition, the antique furniture in that part of the apartment is
destroyed, my piano is damaged.

Okay. Our renter's policy, for example, is for $25,000 replacement costs on
contents of our dwelling. No special riders. Doing a simple, visual
inspection, the insurance agent can clearly see that 1/2 of our
contents
have been destroyed. No arguement there. Before they would cut a
check for $12,500, they have to justify that loss.

So we sit down, making an inventory of what was lost. If I have no
way to "prove" - and by that, the insurance company accepts a written
inventory of model numbers, etc - what electronics were in the entertainment
center, now laying smashed into little electronic bits, they will start to total
up the "average" replacement costs for the items there.

Hence, if I have a fancy flat screen, digital ready 25" TV (about $2,500),
but can't pull that exact information out of my head, then they will alot
the replacement cost for an average TV, probably about $300.

DVD player? What if I have one with a 10 disc changer, add on speakers,
etc. $2,000. But I can't give them model numbers? Then I get the $200
alotted for an "average" DVD player.

Now, they have to sit and start adding up and up until they get to 50% of my
contents.

Does this make more sense? Also, my husband and I have an extensive collection of VHS tapes (several hundred) and DVD's. (okay, we watch too
much tv, LOL). That is several thousand dollars worth of stuff in the
entertainment center. If I can hand an insurance agent an inventory with
all the titles, etc, then replacing them in the event they are destroyed is
easy to add up, dollar wise.

So in the event of a total loss, having appraisals on certain items, so thatit can
"prove" the replacement cost, just means you get to that total faster. They
don't quibble over every single item.

I hope I'm making sense here.

dee

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2002 14:26:29 -0400
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>

This was the third year of Quilt Odyssey in Gettysburg, PA. I recommend
it enthusiastically. The contest quilts were wonderful and there were lots
of great vendors! The weather was the culprit. With the temperature in the
very high nineties, the AC was simply inadequate to cool the enormous
space and failed entirely about 2 p.m. Shortly after that the lights went
out;they gave up and closed the show at 4 (two hours early). They
announced that people should keep their writs bands on and they could come
back the next day free (I was impressed that Missy Molino, the producer,
tried very hard to make up for a bad situation.).
Of course, my favorite part of the show was the exhibit of early
20th century quilts curated by Fran Fitz. Fran had organized 50 (count
them) quilts representing most of the trends of the first half of the last
century. Imagine how thrilled I was to find my gaudy Ocean Waves
(circa 1900) occupying the first spot as I walked into the show. Quilt
Odyssey accords the antique quilts the prominence they deserve.
John and Peggy Armstrong (FVF members) created charming vignettes
with pieces from their vast collection of antique sewing items and
ephemera. There were two examples of quilts quilted Effie Delauter, a MD
quilter of the mid-20th century whom Fran has studied and written about. Effie
will make you re-think everything you thought you knew about the state of
quilting in the 1940s and 50s. You could have taught a class on 20th
century quilt history by walking through the exhibit: Marie
Webster's Wreath of Roses,a satin crib quilt a la the Wilkinson sisters,
embroidered Water Lilies, Dresden Plates (including one marvelously unusual
variation), Double Wedding Rings (round and not-so round), an Art Deco Rainbow
and a delightfully unexpected 4-block Prince's Feather (the plumes look
like a jester's cap), a Perkiomen Valley, a Paragon Needlework Snowflake kit
in blue and white, a Marion Cheever Whiteside Bible Quilt, an
embroidered Gone with the Wind quilt, Quiltie Quaddies, another Bible quilt made from
Ruby McKim patterns, a couple of extraordinary Redwork quilts, a Yo-Yo.
This is not a complete list; there were Stars and Nine Patches and Tulips,
etc.
I could go on, but I'm headed for the beach.
Cinda from the way too hot Eastern Shore

------------------------------
------------------------------

Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 09:22:27 -0400
From: Beth Donaldson <quilts@museum.msu.edu>

You Are Invited!
I know many quilters are planning to be in Lansing, Michigan, August
9-11 for the World Quilt and Textile Show. While in town, please stop by
the Great Lakes, Great Quilts Area at the Great Lakes Folk Festival (a
five minute ride by bus or car to downtown East Lansing). The quilt tents
will be open on August 10-11, from noon-5:30 pm. You will meet quilters
from all over the state who will be demonstrating restoration techniques,
selling
raffle quilt tickets, giving advice on home quilt care, documenting
quilts
(yes, you may bring quilts to document), telling their stories to a
QSOS
interviewer, and reading stories to children about quilts and showing
quilts made to go along with the books. Five guilds will be
represented:
West Michigan Quilters Guild, Piecemakers Guild of Saginaw, Genesee
Star Quilters, Quilt Guild of Metro Detroit, and Scrapbaggers of Owosso.
Call Beth before August 8, at 517-432-3800 if you have any questions. If
you e-mail me before August 8, I can e-mail you a map that will help you
get around town.

Visit our web site for more information,
http://www.museum.msu.edu/Greatlakesfolkfest/Programs&Activities/QuiltProgra
ms/index.html

The Michigan State University Museum is open to the public (hours for the
museum are: Monday-Friday 9 am-5pm; Saturday, 10 am-5pm and Sunday 1pm-5pm)
but there is only one quilt currently on exhibit. It is a quilt made to
commemorate 4-H. In the packaging exhibit on the first floor there are some
feedsacks and two dresses made from feedsack fabric. In the
Celebrating 100
years of 4-H exhibit on the second floor is a delightful display of
clothing made by one talented 4-H-er during her childhood and teenage
years.

Our next quilt exhibit Quilts Old and New: Reproductions from the Great
Lakes Quilt Center will run from January 2003-August 2003. Details of
the exhibit are still pending. The Great Lakes Quilt Center is part of
the Michigan State University Museum. We only have quilt exhibits every
other year. We would love to have quilts out all the time, but must share
our gallery space with the other 1,000,000 objects in our collections!
All the rest of the quilts are in storage. There are other ways you can
access our collections. You can schedule a behind the scenes tour. See
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/collections_behindscenes.html for more
information on this program.

You may also access the collections for research by submitting your
request to:
Archivist
Michigan Traditional Arts Program Research Collections
302 A Central Services, Red Cedar Lane
East Lansing, MI 48824

To see which quilt exhibits are travelling and where, go to this
site: http://museum.msu.edu/museum/tes/index.html

For more information on our programs visit our home page at
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/index.html

Thank you for your interest.
Beth
Beth Donaldson
Quilt Collections Assistant
Great Lakes Quilt Center at the Michigan State University Museum
201 Central Services
East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1045
quilt line: 517-432-3800
quilts@museum.msu.edu
http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/index.html

-
------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 16:39:05 -0500
From: "Dale/Jean Carlton" <djcarlton@att.net>

I am looking for information on vintage Broderie Perse style quilts.
If you know of any specific sites or people who specialize in this style
please email me or post to the digest.
Thanks
Jean Carlton
MN Quilt Appraiser

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 20:20:17 -0400
From: "Dee Stark" <dee@nf2g.com>

Jocelyn said:

> Apparently it's common enough that Rubbermaid has a testimonial ad about

I hadn't seen that.

> However, we won't know about the long-term effects on textiles until it's
> too late for any of us. :)

Okay, so how do we test this? ARe there ways to simulate the effects of time in that storage environment?

Does the risk outway the benefit?

dee

------------------------------
Date: Tue, 06 Aug 2002 05:06:38 -0400
From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net>
I know from first-hand experience that the Rubbermaid tubs are NOT good for
long-term storage of fabric. I was recently going through some old
projects, one of which was stored in one of those two-tone blue Rubbermaid
tubs. Much of the fabric had turned yellow! A dark yellow, seeping into the
pieces, not something that would wash out. There was nothing else in the
tub that could have caused this other than the container itself. This
project had been stored away for about ten years. I was happy it was mostly
strips I had cut out, not that much sewn together, so to the trash
they went.

So plastic tubs may protect your textiles from fire, but I wouldn't want to
take chances with the chemicals in the plastic, especially with antique
quilts. Even temporarily, I think it would be wise to line the piece with
acid-free paper or put the quilts in a clean pillowcase first.

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 13:30:24 -0400
From: "Dee Stark" <dee@nf2g.com>

Judy wrote:

> I know from first-hand experience that the Rubbermaid tubs are NOT good
for> long-term storage of fabric.

Was this modern fabric, or vintage? 100% cotton?

> tubs. Much of the fabric had turned yellow! A dark yellow, seeping intothe
> pieces, not something that would wash out. There was nothing else in the

Does sound like chemical reaction, doesn't it :-(

> So plastic tubs may protect your textiles from fire, but I wouldn't want to
> take chances with the chemicals in the plastic, especially with antique
> quilts.

I have had antique textiles and modern fabric in Rubbermaid totes in an
uninsulated attic for going on 2 years - heat in the summer reaches well
over 100 degrees. Every time I go to my mom's, I pop the lid, refold, stir
things around, then reseal. So far so good.

Much of my personal stash has been in Rubbermaid, going on 10 years, and no
problems yet, although I'm in those quite often. Every few months, at least
;-)

> Even temporarily, I think it would be wise to line the piece with
> acid-free paper or put the quilts in a clean pillowcase first.

Absolutely.

But still the question remains of protection from fire, smoke, and water
damage (even in a flood situation). None of our current storage
recommendations offer any help for those conditions, and those are
the most
devestating.

dee

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 06 Aug 2002 13:39:15 -0400
From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net>

This was modern fabric, 100% cotton. The tubs were the "Roughneck" kind
from Rubbermaid. They had been stored in a dry carpeted basement.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2002 16:49:44 -0500
From: "Nancy Kirk" <kirkcollection@kirk.coxatwork.com>

Good news -- bad news from Omaha. We didn't get enough people
registered to go forward with the Quilt Heritage Conference in
September, but we are going ahead with the Quilt Restoration Workshop
that same weekend. Here are the revised details:

Friday, Sept. 27, Optional field trip to the International Quilt
Study
Center in Lincoln. We'll meet with Curator Carolyn Ducey, look at
quilts in the storage facility, and re-fold them to go back into
storage. Then lunch followed by a visit to an exhibit of quilts from
the James Collection at Morrill Hall. On the way back to Omaha we'll
make a few antique stops.

Saturday, Sept. 28 Workshop Day One -- in the morning we cover technical
aspects of restoration plus a discussion of the differences between
restoration, conservation and preservation. Then in the afternoon we
do
a triage session -- everyone brings a quilt they plan to work on and
goes home with a restoration plan. In the late afternoon we do an
optional session on The Business of Restoration, briefly covering
pricing, contracts, marketing, insurance and liability.

Sunday, Sept. 29 Workshop Day Two -- in the morning we do an
introduction to fabric and quilt dating and practice using silk
crepeline. Then after lunch we talk about fusibles and adhesives --
when and when not to consider using them -- plus creating fabrics
when
you can't find suitable vintage ones, and end with cleaning, storage
and
display.

We have 8 spaces available in the workshop. To register, call me at
800-398-2542.

Hope to see you in September.

Yours,

Nancy Kirk
The Kirk Collection
www.kirkcollection.com

 
 
 

""
221 ]

""

Copyright ęPhoebeMoon Web Design Solutions