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The Yellow~Ribbons Project - Quilters who care

Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2002 11:46:13 -0400 From: seater@mindspring.com To: 

Fun reading about all the nomenclature. I was a "material girl" until I began quiltmaking in PA after the Bicentennial and converted with a conscious effort sometime thereafter to "fabric" from going to "the fabric department/store."

Here's another version of derivation of "tawdry", from the American Heritage Dictionary, 1969:

Taw-dry. Gaudy and cheap; vulgarly ornamental. From <tawdry lace> short for <Seynt Audries lace>, cheap and gawdy lace neckties sold at fairs in honor of St. Audrey (died AD 679), queen of Northumbria [England], who died of a throat tumor regarded as punishment for her fondness for necklaces.

Susan in NC

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Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2002 12:04:16 -0400 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> To: Qhl list <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Tawdry & poison green Message-ID: 

Susan -- thanx for another tawdry definition and another spelling variant.

To piggy back on Judy's poison green, the actual color was Paris Green, an emerald green fashionable in the 19th C for both clothes and home decor. Due to several deaths caused from arsenic-based pigments in wallpaper, the popular name became poision green. This information from a Pantone website. Possibly this expression grew to cover all greens of potential poisonous contents; nile green is defined by one dictionary as a range from yellow green to lt. vivid green. Just a thought.

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Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2002 16:32:27 +0000 From: "Ann-Louise Beaumont" 

This is something that I have noticed in 2 different contexts. Years ago there was a lady from Australia showing slides of Australian quilts in Northampton, Massachusetts (I think it was a meeting of the Hands Across the Valley Guild) and it was remarkable how much orange and rust were used in the quilts compared to the Massachusetts quilts made by the guild members at the time. I suspect it is a reflection of the colors seen in the Australian landscapes and also the quality of light there. The second instance came up just recently. A dear friend in Massachusetts and I are doing a block exchange: she makes 2 blocks, sends one to me, and vice versa. She started out with an antique applique block in reproduction fabrics so I have tried to keep my stuff similar. The last block I made was a prairie flower block with red, yellow, and that yellow-green green for the stem and leaves. I made the block on holiday on Vancouver Island, British Columbia and it looked great. When I got home in Colorado and put it up on the design wall, it looked awful. In the Colorado light, the yellow-green plus the yellow of the flower was way too yellow, and I was very disappointed. However, since I work so slowly, I didn't want to redo it. When I visited with my friend in Massachusetts, I showed her the block and told her how I didn't like it, she thought it was fine and didn't want me to change it so she kept it as is. It may be that she knew how long it would take me to improve it. However, in the Massachusetts light, it didn't look quite so yucky. The duplicate block I made for myself has more blue-green greens and here in Greeley, CO, it looks great. I should probably take it to BC and Massachusetts if I get the chance, just to get my own reactions to it. The weather in BC is like Seattle's- often grey and rainy, but while we were there, there was lots of sun, so maybe it has something to do with latitude and angles. By the way, this will be my first AQSG get-together and I am looking forward to meeting QHL folks, in addition to AQSG people.

Best Wishes, Ann-Louise Beaumont in Greeley, CO

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Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2002 16:20:20 EDT From: AmyOKorn@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com Subject: Poison green reference Message-ID: <14d.14726906.2abf8004@aol.com> 

Judy White requested that I share the source of the reference to Nile green as "poison green." I first came across this reference in a little book called Dating Quilts: From 1600 to the Present by Helen Kelley, published in 1995. On page 43 in a section of the book called "Dyes" she talks about "flower colors" in the period from 1920-1940 and refers to Nile green as "sometimes referred to a poison green." Does this seem possible? (I suspect that various color discussions have already occurred on the list and if you prefer not to rehash old ground, I'll be happy to search the Quilt History List archives!)

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Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2002 16:33:09 -0400 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> To: Qhl l

Amy and all -- I hastily went through two Sears catalogs: 1897 -- nile green could be found on Serpentine Crepe, a brand name for cotton kimono crepe; Japanese silk; albatross, a lightweight wool; and henrietta, a wool/cotton mixture. 1909 -- wall paper came in shades of nile green, apple green, vernon green, patient or patent green and dark green. These dates would bear out the renaming of Paris Green and probably other greens.

Possibly the reference to poison green might have been a past tense description for this color??? At any rate, nile green was a hugely popular fashion color in spirng 1948 and whatever its past problems, it was cured by then. I made an allover eyelet dress and am still living to tell about it. :-)

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Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 07:39:55 -0700 From: "Laurette Carroll" <rj.carroll@verizon.net> To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Re: [vintagefabrics] poison green-long 

Hello QHL, To add to the information already posted on poison green. Poisonous chemicals have always been used in dyes. During the 18th & 19th centuries one of the culprits was green dyes.

This from J.N.Lyles a dye historian, in The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing, 1990. "Scheele's green (blue-stone sage, green arsenic sage, or arsenic sage) appeared about 1770, and while it was lightfast on cotton, linen, and paper, it was extremely poisonous. Napier complained bitterly in 1875 that the dye was still being used and that it poisoned the maker, the winders of yarn dyed with it, and the person using the dyed article. It was particularly bad if used on wallpaper in bedrooms since the occupant usually spent 7-9 hours per day in such a room. Very good evidence indicates that Napoleon dyed of arsenic poisoning while in exile on the island of St. Helene and that the poisoning may have been accidental. Recent evidence indicates that servants in the house may also have suffered arsenic poisoning and that the rooms were probably covered with blue-stone sage wallpaper."

BTW. Karl Wilhelm Scheele, (1742-1786), was an 18th. century Swedish pharmacist who worked on inventing new dyes and was the discoverer of chlorine in 1774. Blue-stone is copper sulfate.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

> "The culprit was arsenic acid, used in the oxidation process of several > colours. Arsenic was still in limited use, despite an awareness of its > devastating effects. Its use in wallpaper and paint was particularly > popular, not in the least in a pale green shade that had caught on in > the mid-1860's. Here arsenite of copper was not just a constituent of > the dye but the dye itself, and became known, after its Swedish > inventor, as Scheele's Green....At Guy's Hospital in London a surgeon > had been presented with many patients suffering from sore eyelids and > lips and lung and throat complaints, and he was the first to isolate a > universal cause. A cheap and widely used type of wallpaper was > decorated in green foliage and flowers, the pattern made up in thick > relief of arsenite of copper. Under heat or agitation from brushing or > cleaning, particles of dust would slowly poison people in the room." > > Judy White

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Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 13:42:04 -0400 From: "laurafisher" <laurafisher@netlink1.net> To: "Jennifer Hill" <jennifer.hill@shaw.ca> Cc: <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Re: Crazy 

Both the D.A.R. (Daughters of the American Revolution) Museum in Washington D.C. and the Shelburne Museum in Vermont have quilts on display in full size, glass (or lucite) enclosed wooden frame systems, so contact them for info on how to construct something similar.

The new American Folk Art Museum in NYC has a new system for full size quilt display where the center to which the quilt is affixed is open at the sides so it can be rolled out for changing the display.

Best to protect fabric behind glass if it's in a place where lots of people may touch.

Laura Fisher

----- Original Message ----- From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hill@shaw.ca> To: <QHL@cuenet.com> Sent: Friday, September 20, 2002 6:35 PM Subject: QHL: Crazy Quilt Query

> Hi All, > > I work in a quilt shop, and today a customer brought in an old crazy > quilt and wanted some advice on its restoration, conservation, and > ways to display it. It was made by members of a rural women's group, > and based on what is known of its makers, I'd guess first quarter > 20th century. It's mostly silk, with a fair bit of embroidery, and > in fairly good condition. There are only a few patches that have > shattered badly, and they all seem to be of the same fabrics. It was > pieced on muslin foundations, and backed with a sturdy cotton print, > although this bottom layer wasn't attached except around the edges. > We live in a very friendly climate as far as textile conservation > goes - this piece has been stored dry and in the dark, so it is > fairly clean, bright, and un-musty. > > The group that currently owns it would like to display it in their > community hall. They say they have the resources available to build a > proper frame or display case, if only they knew what was required. > The main problem I see with this piece is, that it is so very large, > approximately 65" x 84". I can't see how it could be hung and not > suffer quickly because of its own weight. My first thought was that > I wouldn't bother to try to replace or "restore" the damaged patches, > as there weren't many of them, they didn't seem to threaten the basic > structure of the piece, and if the piece could be displayed as the > group intends, it wouldn't get handled such that further damage was a > big concern. > > So, has anyone any experience building a frame to support and display > such a large piece? Are there any alternative ways to exhibit it so > that current and future generations can admire it? > > Thanks for any advice and help, > > Jennifer Hill > Calgary, AB >

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Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 14:50:27 -0400 From: "judygrow" <judygrow@rcn.com> To: "Quilt 

Point of reference ---

"Lucite", "Plexiglass" and "Acrylite" are copyrighted trade names. It is best to use the generic term -- acrylic glazing.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@rcn.com

> quilts on display in full > size, glass (or lucite) enclosed wooden frame systems, so contact them for > info on how to construct something similar. > > The new American Folk Art Museum in NYC has a new system for full size quilt > display where the center to which the quilt is affixed is open at the sides > so it can be rolled out for changing the display. > > Best to protect fabric behind glass if it's in a place where lots of people > may touch. > > Laura Fisher > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hill@shaw.ca> > To: <QHL@cuenet.com> > Sent: Friday, September 20, 2002 6:35 PM > Subject: QHL: Crazy Quilt Query > > > > Hi All, > > > > I work in a quilt shop, and today a customer brought in an old crazy > > quilt and wanted some advice on its restoration, conservation, and > > ways to display it. It was made by members of a rural women's group, > > and based on what is known of its makers, I'd guess first quarter > > 20th century. It's mostly silk, with a fair bit of embroidery, and > > in fairly good condition. There are only a few patches that have > > shattered badly, and they all seem to be of the same fabrics. It was > > pieced on muslin foundations, and backed with a sturdy cotton print, > > although this bottom layer wasn't attached except around the edges. > > We live in a very friendly climate as far as textile conservation > > goes - this piece has been stored dry and in the dark, so it is > > fairly clean, bright, and un-musty. > > > > The group that currently owns it would like to display it in their > > community hall. They say they have the resources available to build a > > proper frame or display case, if only they knew what was required. > > The main problem I see with this piece is, that it is so very large, > > approximately 65" x 84". I can't see how it could be hung and not > > suffer quickly because of its own weight. My first thought was that > > I wouldn't bother to try to replace or "restore" the damaged patches, > > as there weren't many of them, they didn't seem to threaten the basic > > structure of the piece, and if the piece could be displayed as the > > group intends, it wouldn't get handled such that further damage was a > > big concern. > > > > So, has anyone any experience building a frame to support and display > > such a large piece? Are there any alternative ways to exhibit it so > > that current and future generations can admire it? > > > > Thanks for any advice and help, > > > > Jennifer Hill > > Calgary, AB > > > >

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Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 15:02:14 -0400 From: Judy White <jawhite@infi.net> To: 

Click here to order MauveHi Amy. Thanks for the reference. I had not heard of that book before. Not to belabor this subject, but on p. 105 of "Mauve" by Simon Garfield, it speaks extensively about various colors which 'poison' people. The culprits were the new aniline (synthetic) dyes being developed in England.

"The culprit was arsenic acid, used in the oxidation process of several colours. Arsenic was still in limited use, despite an awareness of its devastating effects. Its use in wallpaper and paint was particularly popular, not in the least in a pale green shade that had caught on in the mid-1860's. Here arsenite of copper was not just a constituent of the dye but the dye itself, and became known, after its Swedish inventor, as Scheele's Green....At Guy's Hospital in London a surgeon had been presented with many patients suffering from sore eyelids and lips and lung and throat complaints, and he was the first to isolate a universal cause. A cheap and widely used type of wallpaper was decorated in green foliage and flowers, the pattern made up in thick relief of arsenite of copper. Under heat or agitation from brushing or cleaning, particles of dust would slowly poison people in the room."

It goes on to say that children who slept in rooms papered with this wallpaper even died of arsenical poisoning. This same color was also being used in fabrics. So it's not surprising that this color became to be called 'poison' green. Whoever coined that phrase was onto something in his day. This is a most interesting book and I suggest that if you have the slightest interest in the how and why of color, you should read it.

Judy White

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Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 16:21:55 -0400 From: "Suzanne Cawley" 

Hi All!

I returned last evening (a 3 hour drive) from a wonderful meeting of the Dating Club chaired by Hazel Carter in Northern Va. I usually make a stop or two on the way home to rural WV and, this time, chose Borders Book Store instead of G Street Fabrics. I bought a great book that I thought would interest anyone on the list who loves old fabrics (would that include all of us?). I know that the "number one" book on antique quilt textiles is considered by many to be Florence Montgomery's "Printed Textiles" but I don't have 3 to 4 hundred dollars to spend on a used copy. You may enjoy this other book almost as much for far less money.

The book I bought is "Textile Designs: 200 Years of European and American Patterns Organized by Motif, Style, Color, Layout, and Period" by Susan Meller and Joost Elffers. It is a softbound April 2002 reprint of one originally published in December 1991 as a hardback only. The retail price is $35.00 but today I discovered it is 30% off at Amazon.com. The book contains 450 pages of fabric photos, descriptions, and dates. It is a real delight for the eyes! No, I am not getting a commission for plugging it.....but if you have not seen this book, check it out! It is a great value for the price!

P.S. For all FVF members, I will share the book to our next meeting.

Suzanne Cawley still enjoying the fantastic weather in wild, wonderful WV

 
 

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