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Quilters Find a way to care

96022

 

Date: 22 Dec 96 11:39:31 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037@CompuServe.COM>

Ok now I am really going to get myself in hot water. Textile fabric names

Linsey-woolsey ok what do we really know? Yes cloths coming from Linsey Engalnd

were sometimes called linsey as town names were helpful for distinguishing

regional fabric production traditions Its use in colonial and post revolutionary

America is very confusing. The term was used by deToqueville in his

discriptions of traveling in America to mean a coarse home produced fabric with

either linen or cotton warp and singles wool filling ( weft) in solids and

stripes always in plain weave and without much finishing. The biggest problem I

have is that people weaving in their homes at the same time did not use the

term "linsey-woolsey" as often as those in the 20th century. Often the

referrences to weaving plain cloth of linen and wool were simply called " mixed

stuff" Stuff usually equaling plain weave cloth as opposed to twills, figures,

spot etc.

The nice thing about using the term linsey-woolsey is that we can know it is

plain weave and that it has cotton or linen warp and singles wool crossing it.

So it is a good place to communicate but usually I try to find a referrence for

a particular decade and its vernacular use, use by those weaving, and

descriptive use by dry goods merchants etc. For example the term Fustian changes

almost every 10 years between 1700 and 1900. Jean which has never changed in

description is a sub set of fustian go figure. The most important thing is that

we have so much surviving plain weave mixed cloth in many colors and weights

Important though none of the surviving pieces are what I would call irregular or

rough textured and when people reproduce it today they often mistake a low count

( warp threads and weft threads per inch) for a lumpy bumpy look for instance in

the pieces I have in my collection the counts are usually in the high 30's to

low 40's unless they are horse blankets which we do find so that would look like

a low count sheet not like a lumpy irregular texture usually the yarns are very

well spun and the weaving which can be problematic with linen warps is done

well.

------------------------------

Date: 22 Dec 96 11:39:33 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037@CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHL@cue.com" <QHL@cue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: fabric sheen

Message-ID: <961222163932_75444.1037_FHQ30-3@CompuServe.COM>

I have also heard about egg white glazes on worsted whole cloth quilts and on

what we have come to call cotton Chintz of the 18th century. I cannot however

find any actual receipes or directions for it as a fabric glaze That doesnt mean

it wsnt used - but we do find good information about heat glazing worsteds and

gum arabic and wax glazes. I just spent a few minutes in my library ( textile

technology collection) and still could only come up with Gum Arabic and various

other starch combinations. An introduction to textile finishing, by Marsh.

Posselt's textile library series and the Cyclopedia of Textile Work but these

are all 19th century not 18th century. I will keep looking because we are very

interested in finding the recipes. The Met has asked us to glaze some worsted

and I have been experimenting with gum arabic and wax but I would love to have

something easy like egg white to work with. I am curious though if egg whites

will need the introduction of a pliable substance to keep the surface from

breaking The glazing problem is just that one of keeping the glaze a pliable

surface as textile move so much and this is semi permanent.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Dec 1996 15:44:53 -0500

From: QuiltLine@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #19

Message-ID: <961222154452_236623988@emout10.mail.aol.com>

Hi all,

I haven't posted in a while, in fact only a few times since the beginning.

I have read intently however all of everyone else's posts. I am glad to

read today that we are encouraging each other in the sharing of quilt

knowledge, and hope that the debates that continue on this list, (and I am

sure there will be more). One of my favorite things about those who love

quilts, is that most of us, don't mind the sharing of information. It is

how we are enriched and can also learn how to enrich others. Perhaps this

open forum will encourage those who want to keep all of their knowledge to

themselves, to be more open. From the posts that have been made here since

the beginning of the list, this is certainly not a threatening environment,

and I for one am only here to learn, and appreciative of what has been

shared.

Debbie Roberts

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Dec 1996 19:03:37 -0500 (EST)

From: beral26@interlynx.net

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: linsey -woolsey

Message-Id: <199612230003.TAA02956@boris.interlynx.net>

Content-Type: text/plain

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi all, I've unlurked to respond to the suggestion that linsey-woolsey is named

after a town in England. I am originally from England and have never heard of

a town called that- that is not to suggest it does'nt exist - just I've never

heard of linsey-woolsey in that connection. It is not listed in the Michelin

Motoring Atlas of Great Britain & Ireland. I have studied 19th century costume

and have some museum experience and always understood the name came from

being a

mixture of wool and linen/ or cotton.

I am really enjoying this list and the discussion. I feel that I can learn a

lot from the expertise of you all. I have sewed as long as I can remember,

but

more of a newbie when it comes to quilting. The history of textiles/quilts

fascinates me, as does the history of needlework tools/workboxes. I have been

collecting them for twenty-five years. Looking forward to the continuation of

the discussion. Happy Holidays......Alma in Southern Ontario.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Dec 1996 20:07:24 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: shine on fabrics

Message-ID: <961222200723_610685684@emout07.mail.aol.com>

Bev, and everyone,

I have in "protective custody" a fabulous Victorian Crazy Quilt which

also has a golden brown cotton sateen backing. Wonder if this was common, or

just a coincidence?? The quilt was in my MIL's godmother's trunk, and we

didn't get it til she passed away, so don't know who made it. Pretty sure it

was made late 1800's. In very good condition, some fabrics deteriorating.

Has chenille work, Kate Greenaway embroidered children, hand painted patches

with a bird's nest & eggs, lots of different embroidery stitches, gorgeous

fabrics, etc. Border is a crimson velvet. It has 4 fan blocks in the

center, almost gives it a "sun" appearance, and 4 fan blocks, one in each

corner. The crazy quilt patches are definitely done in blocks. This is a

very organized Crazy Quilt!!

The reason I have it in "protective custody" is that my MIL was "storing"

it in her attic....just threw it up there. I asked to borrow it for a quilt

show, and it had been rained on!! Then, she talked about putting it in a

display window (they all face west) at her jewelry store!! She has no idea

how fragile this textile treasure is. I have it rolled with acid free tissue

paper, then in a cotton sheet, under my bed. Temperature and humidity there

are pretty stable. Much better than her attic!! (After 25 years, she still

calls what I do "knitting" !!)

Can you stand some more book reviews?? I will post them separately.

TTFN, Karan

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Dec 1996 20:07:39 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Book Review: First Flowerings

Message-ID: <961222200738_1590479458@emout17.mail.aol.com>

I was privileged to attend one of the DAR "hands on" quilt lectures in March.

If you have a chance, they are WONDERFUL!! I, too, was a tiny bit

depressed that I couldn't take pictures, but getting to handle a real

Baltimore Album quilt, also quilts made by relatives of Edgar Allen Poe,

Francis Scott Keyes, and Martha Washington, made up for it. I was very

careful not to drool on the quilts!! Nancy Tuckhorn, textiles curator, was

our workshop presenter, and I asked every question I could think of. Most of

the rest of the group was very quiet...in awe of these fabulous, historic

textiles. (I figured they could always just ship me back to Iowa!)

The first piece we saw was a quilted petticoat from the 1700's. Nancy

explained that due to space limitations, they must evaluate any potential new

acquistions, and see how it compares to pieces they already have in the

collection. Because of this, they have kept the best of the best, and have a

marvelous collection.

I found a book in the DAR Museum gift shop, called "FIRST FLOWERING: EARLY

VIRGINIA QUILTS" by Gloria Seaman Allen, Curator, based on an exhibit from

July to Oct. 1987. This book contains both color and b&w photos of quilts

from the exhibit, along with background information. The exhibit, and book,

brought together quilts made in northern and eastern Virginia prior to 1840.

I purchased this book as a souvenir, because some of the quilts we were

shown are included- but there is lots of excellent information included.

Also, the price can't be beat: $5.00!! This is soft cover, 46 pages. Most

of the quilts are medallion style, and feature the glazed cotton chintz we

have been discussing lately. Sorry to say, I don't have the DAR Museum phone

number, maybe one of you nearer Washington can share that, if anyone is

interested.

One of the comments that stayed with me from that day, was that the

technique we would call "trapunto" today, was called "stuffed work" at the

time these quilts were being made. It was fascinating for me to see quilts

of this age, when we did the Iowa Quilts Research Project, we saw very few

quilts older than 1850 (Iowa became a state in 1846), and none of those older

quilts were made in Iowa.

This is another reason our discussions are so valuable...although I have

seen quite a few 1850's- 1950's quilts in the Midwest....I have little

experience with quilts from the East or South. So fascinating to learn more

about ALL of this!! We can all keep adding little "pieces to the puzzle" as

we shed more light on fabrics, quilts and quiltmakers.

Karan

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Dec 1996 20:07:53 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Book Review: No Time On My Hands

Message-ID: <961222200753_976283363@emout05.mail.aol.com>

No Time On My Hands, by Grace Snyder, as told to Nellie Snyder Yost

This is the autobiography of Grace McCance Snyder, told in a style that

will remind you of Laura Ingalls Wilder's series of Little House books.

Copyright 1963, reprinted in 1986 by the University of Nebraska Press, ISBN

# 0-8032-9164-7

I don't know if this book is currently available, but it is well worth

tracking down. Grace tells of her life growing up on the high plains of

Nebraska "where, as a child of seven and up, I wished three wishes and

dreamed three dreams. I wished that I might grow up to make the most

beautiful quilts in the world, to marry a cowboy, and to look down on the top

of a cloud. At the time I dreamed those dreams and wished those wishes, it

seemed impossible that any of them could ever come true" (but they all did).

Grace's beautiful petit point style "Flower Basket" quilt is shown in

color on the cover of my copy, but the one thing (from a quilter's point of

view) lacking in the book is color photos of more of Grace's quilts. There

are family photos, and a few b&w's with Grace's quilts in the background.

Grace tells how she pieced the Flower Basket quilt, based on a design on a

china plate, of "triangle shaped pieces so small, that eight of them sewed

together made a "block" no larger than a two-cent postage stamp." It took

16 months to complete. When the quilt was finished, Grace wrote to the china

company to see if she could find out who had designed the pattern. The owner

of the company was so impressed with the photo of her quilt, he sent her an

entire set of the china! Eventually, she was able to correspond with the

German man who had designed the basket motif.

Grace was born in 1882, and lived to be 100 years old. What amazing

changes occurred over the century she lived. She was one of the quilters

interviewed by Molly Newman prior to the writing of the play QUILTERS! and

you will recognize some of Grace's anecdotes in the play! Grace was inducted

into the Quilter's Hall of Fame in 1980.

She started as a child, piecing scraps with leftovers from the family's

clothing, but used her "last dollar to buy enough yard goods to piece a quilt

top" to take along when she hired out to teach at a prairie school when she

was 18. Later, she married a neighbor, Bert Snyder, the cowboy she dreamed

of, and they moved to a ranch in the sand hills of Nebraska. Her, Grace

filled lonely hours with raising her family and stitching prize-winning

quilts. They owned one of the first autos in the sand hills, bought in 1908.

 

This is an enjoyable read, filled with the little everyday happenings, as

well as the quilts that Grace "pieced in her spare time".

Hope you find some "spare time" for some stitching during the holidays!!

Karan

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Dec 1996 21:20:41 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: shine on fabrics

Message-ID: <961222212041_1821097108@emout01.mail.aol.com>

Love the book reviews by SadieRose..I woul dlike to add to the Grace McCance

Snyder one..seveal years ago I hostessed a dicussion table at the AMSG

conference in NE..one of my feedsack club members, Linda Winter, of Holdrege,

NE invited me to spend a some time with her..while at her home, I was reading

the book SadieRose reviewed and Linda told me Mrs. Snyder's home was not too

far from Holdrege..did I want to explore and find it? ARE YOU SERIOUS?? We

packed a picnic and off we went..Grace's daughter tells of the cemetary where

immediate family members were buried..WE FOUND IT!! There is one particular

plot where the marker has a "bubble frame" picture of the lady buried

there..sure enough, there it was..I can;t recall but I think it was an aunt

or Grace's sister..SadieRose would know from the book.also, when Grace's

daughter flew to an exhibit of Grace's quilts..the quilts rode in the seat

next to Grace's daughter..a place of honor..many thanx, SadieRose for the

wonderful review and the memsories it awakened of my visit to ehr home

area..we found the area of ehr homne after she was wed but there was nothing

there to determine exactly WHICH spot it was..where her home had stood at one

time..the lady who was born in a soddy, reared in a soddy, boarded /lived in

a soddy when teaching school, and married and tended top her family in a

soddy..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Dec 1996 13:38:39 -0600 (CST)

From: celmore@ksu.edu

To: qhl@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Introduction

Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.91.961223132338.19322A@cbs.ksu.ksu.edu>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hi, Quilt Historians, etc.

I, too, have been lurking on this listserv because I work as a

librarian and have had very little time to be sending messages. Now that

all the university students and hopefully some of the professors are now

at home instead of in the library I can have a few minutes to pursue other

academic interests--quilts.

My name is Carol Elmore and my quilt interests are appraising quilts

(AQS certified) and collecting fabric, quilts featuring dogs. I am also

interested in feed sacks, especially those advertising chicken feed. I

just bought an interesting sack at a sale which was one of the recycled

sacks having advertising from one company on the front and from another

company on the inside. I have several quilts which have fabrics with feed

sacks from chicken feed. I recently contacted Jane S. who gave me a

couple of contacts for feed sack information. Thank you Jane. I will

probably be interested in joining her feed sack club sometime because it

sounds like an interesting group.

I'm not sure how much I will be able to add to your discussions.

It seems like you all do a good job of discussing various topics. It

sure is fun reading all the comments.

Carol Elmore

Manhattan, Kansas

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Dec 1996 20:57:45 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Introduction

Message-ID: <961223205730_1888344437@emout17.mail.aol.com>

Welcome, Carol..the sack you mention, one advertiser on one side, another on

the inside, is VERY unique and adds toit being collectable..several members

are going to be quite interested in learning about it..we will be happy to

have you with the club but you don't have to join to avail yourself of

help/contacts to gain info/acqurie sacks..and I know all of us will look

forward to more posts from you..Jane

 

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 09:24:44 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: January Birthdays

Message-ID: <961224092440_404639289@emout02.mail.aol.com>

I just learned of another quilter on our list with a January birthday

coming up (mine is too) .... I am amazed at how many quilters I know (several

of them are nationally known) who have January birthdays. If any of you QHL

members have Jan. birthdays, please e-mail me privately (don't hit the reply

key!). I don't have to know the year...just the day. "The weather

outside is frightful".....new snow and wind warnings here. Wishing safe

holiday travel to each of you and your loved ones! Karan

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 00:48:40 PST

From: psiera@juno.com (Pam D Siera)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: egg whites

Message-ID: <19961224.072836.3446.5.PSiera@juno.com>

I hate to contradict Michele, and perhaps we are talking abut two

different things, but I learned to paint with egg tempora by mixing the

inner yolk with dry pigment in layers which made the painting

translusent and that added the depth. A lot of fruit still lifes are

painted this way. I've never heard of glazing a quilt though using any

medium. Pam in Santa Rosa

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 07:06:24 PST

From: psiera@juno.com (Pam D Siera)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: preserving the history

Message-ID: <19961224.072837.3446.7.PSiera@juno.com>

In my cedar chest are several quilts made by my family. I caught

my youngest daughter collecting quilts in her closet and realizing how

important they were to her we went through all the quilts and I tried to

remember as much history as I could and we wrote down at least that much

on paper and pinned it to the quilt.

After all the discussion about oral tradition and being the oldest

woman in my family at 45, I was thinking, what do you all think about my

making labels for these quilts. One in particular is the first quilt my

mother made, would be 1930's with the help of her grandmother, a

Sunbonnet Sue. Another is an unfinished solid yellow and white that my

grandmother told me her aunt had started, she had worked on it and now so

have I and my daughter. It's hand pieced and my grandmother bought more

material so it isn't an exact match. You see already my grandmother is

dead and I can't verify the story but then how will my daughter ever do

better when I make it into a baby quilt if she ever has children?

I don't want to make a mess of them either. Thanks for your

thoughts. Pam

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 11:03:08 -0500

From: SarahOz@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Feedsack value

Message-ID: <961224110307_35554459@emout07.mail.aol.com>

HI All!

Perhaps someone can answer this question that I've been thinking about ever

since I picked up a particular feedsack. I've been collecting sacks for

about 3-4 years. I have a rather large collection most found in Ohio, but I

have found some here in the Phoenix area also.

My question is, are some sacks worth more than others? While I lived in Ohio

I came across, at an antique show, a sack that has Disney's Alice In

Wonderland motif/figures on it. There was only one, and I don't believe the

person selling it saw any worth in it at all considering they only asked a

dollar for it. I'm surprised it wasn't higher in price just because it was a

disney/animation item. It is in excellent condition and still is stitched

into the bag with the original seams. I haven't seen since any bags with

Disney things on them.

Thanks for you help and Happy Holidays!

Rose Gray

Tempe AZ

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 11:24:06 -0500

From: QuiltFixer@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Seasons Greeting From Toni

Message-ID: <961224112405_1289491911@emout19.mail.aol.com>

Have a happy and safe Holiday. Wishes for a wonderful new year. I am so

happy to be on this list with all of you.

Merry Christmas

Toni Baumgard

QuiltFixer@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 11:24:34 -0500

From: Knutem@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: preserving the history

Message-ID: <961224112428_875846066@emout12.mail.aol.com>

Sounds like you have some treasures. I would definitely make some labels with

the information that you know.

Good luck,

Bet

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 11:27:15 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Feedsack value

Message-ID: <961224112715_371098922@emout14.mail.aol.com>

Well, you lucky sacker, you!! GOOD FOR YOU!! It is worth anywhere from

$25.00 and UP!! Like anything, the right location, the right person would

pat at least $25.00 and a serious collector? $50.00 and up..I have one that

unless they held a gun to my head..and that fact that it is in excellent

condition, still closed (string still in) make sit VERy COLLECTABLE..These

are the ones you would NEVER want to cut up..Yes, Disney appears on numerous

ones..I have Alice in Wonderland, Cinderella, Davey Crockette, and there is

also a Snow Wshsite..I have PIECES of a Snow White in the petals of a

Dressden Plate..she and her Prince Charming are heading to the castle on his

white steed..I understand there is a Lil Abner out there..and several members

also have Gone with the Wind..Oh, I almost forgot..I have one with Miceky,

Donald, and Goofy on it..they are such fun, so glorious in colors (because

they were made with dyes we are no longer allowed to use because of the

EPA)..so they are sooo colorful..and VERY historical..IF you are going to

sell it I know of buyers..so please let me put you in touch with them IF

that is the case..If you hold on to it..it can only increase in value..KEEP

IT INTACT!! We would love to ahve you with THE FEEDSACK CLUB you would be

among 650+ others who buy/sell/trade/collect/exhibit/researchg them..thanx

fof sharing..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 11:28:54 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Feedsack value

Message-ID: <961224112853_610987958@emout19.mail.aol.com>

For Rose Gray and her fabulous Cinderella feedsack..

oopps! I forgot to ask..what color is yours? Mine is yellow background and

Alice is dressed in green..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 11:30:27 -0500

From: Knutem@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Nice Journal

Message-ID: <961224113026_1155286464@emout02.mail.aol.com>

Someone just posted the idea of keeping a journal.

A friend just gave me a very nice journal for Christmas. It is a very small

one and is called THE QUILTER--a notebook. It has blank pages and also some

interesting writings on some of the pages with illustrations. Publisher is A

Quilter's Resource publication Museum Quilts.

IT is a terrific gift...now If I can remember to write in it.

Merry Christmas,

Bet in Florida

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 08:36:11 -0800 (PST)

From: Michele Weise <michele@peppertreestudios.com>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: egg whites

Message-Id: <199612241636.IAA10792@acme.sb.west.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Yes Pam, you are correct--I mixed up my eggs; sorry, that was a dumb

mistake. Yolks in the tempra paints, not whites-- but egg whites for

glazing fabric. What I was questioning on the original post was whether

anyone else had ever seen a glaze on an 18th cent. quilt with egg whites?

It is a very different look than the glaze done by pressing. I tend to

believe my source and now too bad I can't contact her to ask her how she got

her information as she is away. Just for the fun of it, I'd like to try

some egg whites on fabrics that are untreated. I'll let you know the results.

Michele in Moorpark,CA

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 13:05:05 -0500

From: PAMIAM6@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Glad to be aboard

Message-ID: <961224130207_371109573@emout11.mail.aol.com>

I am new to this forum, and am still in shock that there are so many people

as addicted to old fabric as myself. I am sitting here transfixed to all of

your posts. I have been quilting old quilt tops for 20 years, have worn out

my Clues in the Calico, and continually wish that flour and sugar would come

in fabric so that I could have some inspiration to bake for Christmas. Also

wish that my old quilt tops could talk to me and tell me why that one pink

piece was put in that corner. These old tops when quilted add a complete

atmosphere to a room that nothing new can do. I know there is a field of

thought that these old tops should not be "destroyed" from their originality

by quilting, but I know that the makers of those old gems would be glad that

someone is finishing what they were not able to. Hopefully someone will

finish my cupboard full of old tops that I never will get to. Merry

Christmas to you all. Look forward to your messages. Pam Tjelmeland

Springfield Il

Date: Tue, 24 Dec 1996 23:14:56 -0500

From: "J. G. Row" <judygrow@blast.net>

To: <QHL@cue.com>

Subject: QHL: Re: Pam,s old family quilts

Message-Id: <199612250517.AAA16343@fireball.blast.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I do not have old family quilts as I am the first person in the history of

my family to make quiltsd. I take that back -- my mother made two, at my

urging. But I collect old quilts and mostly old quilt tops. The tops are

more affordable, and I like the idea of finally getting some one else's UFO

finished.

Every time I buy a top or a quilt, I ask the present owner to give me all

the information they have on the item. Even if it is only the general

location in the state, it is more information than I would have if I hadn't

asked. All the info I can garner, and some conjectures as well, along with

the date I bought it, how much I paid, and from who and where goes on a

card that I pin to the quilt/top. When I complete the quilt, and have the

binding on, I transfer all that information to muslin and sew it to the

back of the quilt -- along with my name and address, date bought, and all

the information on what I used to complete the item.

There is a tremendous gap in the beginning history of these quilted items,

but from the time it comes into my possession it has a real written

history.

I think Pam should do the same with her family quilts, and should include

all the info she has, even if some of it is conjecture. The history

starts with you! If you don't, who will?

Judy in NJ

judygrow@blast.net

> Subject: QHL: Re: preserving the history

>

> In my cedar chest are several quilts made by my family. I caught

> my youngest daughter collecting quilts in her closet and realizing how

> important they were to her we went through all the quilts and I tried to

> remember as much history as I could and we wrote down at least that much

> on paper and pinned it to the quilt. I was thinking, what do you all

think about my

> making labels for these quilts. One in particular is the first quilt my

> mother made, would be 1930's with the help of her grandmother, a

> Sunbonnet Sue. Another is an unfinished solid yellow and white that my

grandmother told me her aunt had started, she had worked on it and now so

> have I and my daughter. I can't verify the story but then how will my

daughter ever do

> better when I make it into a baby quilt if she ever has children?

Pam

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 96 00:49:29 PST

From: Sharon Harleman Tandy <harleman@micron.net>

To: Quilt History Listserve <QHL@cuenet.com>

Subject: QHL: Merry Christmas to All!

Message-ID: <Chameleon.961225011305.harleman@harleman.micron.net>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

For everyone on QHL, What a wonderful "gift" we have been given and have

given to ourselves: to belong to this list where we "speak the same

language", have the same concerns, and where some of us have the answers to

the queries of others. Merry Christmas to everyone and Happy Stitches!

RE: Pam's old quilts in her cedar chest. You have all the right instincts

to begin preserving what you have, and the information you have. I have

always advised people (especially when they say "But I don't know anything

about the history of the quilt.") that when we register a quilt with no

history, "That's where we must start, ground zero. _Any_ other information

we can get is the frosting on the cake, but every quilt starts out with

nothing (kinda like being born?) and we can build from there. Plus, we must

start somewhere. Quilts I have purchased from auctions, etc. or received as

gifts with no info, at least their history from this point on will be

recorded. The only thing I would caution is that where you include

conjecture, be sure to signify that it _is_ conjecture so that the future

historian will be able to discern where the line is.

The other point I must make is that bare (unfinished) wood is very harmful

to fabrics. Most of us know not to store quilts in plastic (they cannot

breathe) or cardboard boxes (high acidity) but few realize that the

traditional cedar chest storage is even more dangerous to textiles. All

woods are acidic and cedar has one of the highest acid contents. Strange,

that's where so many textiles have been stored. At the very least, line the

chest with acid-free tissue; even better, cushion the fold with acid-free

tissue, fold with a 100% cotton, white sheet (well-rinsed, over and over, to

get out all the remaining bleach, detergent, etc. and _no_ fabric softener).

Fold the sheet along with the quilt, not just wrap the quilt in it. That

way the sheet can protect parts of the quilt from itself at the same time it

protects it from the outside. I need to ask more questions from my friend,

the chemist, and my expert at the paint store, but I have read that wood

with a good painted su!

!

rface is safe for textiles. I have also heard the same thing about clear

finishes, but I don't yet trust that info because of the chemicals in Deft,

polyurethane etc. I know when my retired forester DH who is also a good

carpenter and woodworker, finishes a new project I cannot stand the smell of

it for weeks after the last coat of finish is dry. The one finish I would

recommend from my own experience is tung oil. When we first began using

this as a permanent finish for our furniture, I read that tung oil is used

to coat the inside of some soup cans (have you ever noticed that slightly

golden coating inside of them? That's tung oil; unharmful to us or the

foods, so I believe it wouldn't harm textiles either.) I hope this isn't

too long, I have been accused of being wordy, but then I always worry about

leaving out any helpful information. And a Good Night to All, Sharon in

warming, melting, somewhat rainy Boise.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 03:59:02 -0500

From: MCarey1670@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: preserving the history

Message-ID: <961225035859_1922074146@emout02.mail.aol.com>

Dear Pam,

I think it's a wonderful idea to preserve the history that you do know (or

even the rumors that you have heard) about your family's quilts. I think you

might want to make a fabric envelope that would coordinate with the quilt in

question, and hand-stitch that to the back of the quilt and then put your

information about the quilt (and even any unsubstantiated theories about it

if they seem pertinent) into the envelope. That won't really alter the quilt

itself in any permanent way, but it will let those who come into possession

of it later know what they've got.

I think you're really lucky to have any family quilts; I wish I had some! (I

guess I just have to be the "ancestor" that hands 'em down to others!)

Bye,

Mary Ann in Spokane

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 09:01:12 -0500

From: AJSNGS@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Pam,s old family quilts

Message-ID: <961225090111_1121837675@emout17.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

I've decided to buy some old quilt tops this coming year and maybe finish

them off. I like the fact that they are old, and my quilting will be new!

I've seen a number of them that I passed up--all very reasonably priced--and

now wish I'd bought them. But there will be more....

Merry Christmas,

Nancy in Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 09:02:34 -0500

From: AJSNGS@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Sorry!

Message-ID: <961225090233_1590809580@emout15.mail.aol.com>

I posted my post to the list instead of to the individual. Sorry! I guess

you'll probably give me a break since it's Christmas!

Nancy in Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 09:12:56 -0500

From: AJSNGS@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Merry Christmas

Message-ID: <961225091254_943059446@emout05.mail.aol.com>

Hi Everyone,

Just a quick wish to say Merry Christmas! I hope all of you are having a

wonderful holiday! I love hearing about all the wonderful quilting gifts

everyone is getting!

Fondly, Nancy in Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 11:18:04 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Post-it Notes and preservation (fwd)

Message-ID: <961225111803_1425870634@emout02.mail.aol.com>

The following message was posted on QuiltNet and I thought it was worth

sharing here. Tomorrow I will be checking my books and magazines, I know I am

guilty of using these to mark areas I want to find easily in the future :(

my "Clues in the Calico" has lots of Post-It tabs!! Karan

 

Add Post-it Notes to your "things to keep away from a book" list along

with paper clips, pencils and pens.

The verdict is in on Post-it Notes and similar adhesive

markers! Though they are easy to use and may be removed

from most paper surfaces, DON'T be tempted to use them in

books. These seemingly harmless "markers" leave behind

their adhesive, even when removed immediately. They were

designed for shortterm application to expendable documents

and have no place being used on permanent records and books.

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

conducted research which determined that even when removed

immediately, the adhesive residue remained. Even more

dramatic effects result when used on newsprint (some of the

ink is removed) or on brittle, fragile paper where removal

may result in tearing.

The NARA report concluded "these notes will cause increasing

preservation problems when used with permanent records and

should be avoided." Think before you "Post-it"!

Julie Page

Preservation Librarian

Univ. of Calif., San Diego

jpage@ucsd.edu

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 14:46:40 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Sorry!

Message-ID: <961225144639_676915168@emout10.mail.aol.com>

Shall we forigve her or not? (how can I forgive her, I can't even spell it)

Public flogging? Penance? ORRRRRR, she buys a top, quilts it, and we

claim it!! Cast your vote..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 14:48:45 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Merry Christmas

Message-ID: <961225144845_35685348@emout07.mail.aol.com>

Merry Christmas to you, Nancy..you make posts a pleasure to read..and a

merry Christmas to our 'new family forum'..and to Kris who brings us

together..BLESSINGS to all..it's going to be a wonderful 1997..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 15:00:32 -0500

From: AJSNGS@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Sorry!

Message-ID: <961225150032_1222526972@emout19.mail.aol.com>

Actually Jane, I think that first quilt (whenever it gets quilted) will

probably be framed and sent to my Mom with a note that says "SEE, I can

SEW!!!!! and not cuss a blue streak while I'm doing it!" My mother would be

so impressed!

BTW, this above message is quilt related so I'm not in trouble right Kris?

Merry Christmas! Nancy in sunny cool Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Dec 1996 14:18:31 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28@cybertrails.com>

To: "quilt bee" <QuiltBee@Quilter.com>, "Interquilt" <interquilt@needles.com>

Cc: "Antique quilts" <QHL@cuenet.com>

Subject: QHL: RE: My Webb page

Message-Id: <199612250717.OAA19722@ cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have a BIG appoligy to make to all of you on these lists! I have

wondered why no one could see the pictures on my page like I could when I

went there. It seems that the problem is not you folks but with me. Like

a DUH person I updated my page every weekend. I was so carefull to do

everything that my son said to do. Well, almost everything. It seems that

I was NOT uploading my page to the internet. So what was happening was

that I saw what I had said and was very proud of my work. But it seems as

if I was the only one enjoying all of my success.

Please give me another try. I think that now you will find all of the

goodies that I promised you. I am truley sorry. Sometimes I get more

organized than at other times. I guess I had what you might call a "mind

slippage." I now know that I do suffer from CRS syndrom (Can't Remember

S..t)

Merry Christmas

Mary

mscott28@cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 04:55:13 -0500

From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: SadieRose@aol.com, QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: DAR Museum

Message-Id: <v01540b07aee7fa51ef05@[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Sadie....Debby Kratovil has interviewed Nancy Tuckhorn and written an

article about the DAR museum for an upcoming issue of QUILT magazine. The

main focus of the article is their quilt days and to let the public know

about them.

Would you be so kind as to allow me to print your personal experiences as

expressed in your email with the article. Debby has never been to one of

the quilt days so she cannot give a personal testimony. She thinks adding

such a personal testimony would add a lot to the article and thought I

should do it. However, i have not been to one of the quilt days either. I

have only been a special guest at the DAR for an afternoon arranged by the

British Embassy for some of their visitors, one of whom is a personal

friend of mine...i was sort of a shirt-tail tag along, but it was thrilling

because we also went into their vault to see all of the quilts there.

I remember standing amongst the 200 or so quilts in the vault and thinking

if i am destined to drop dead suddenly of a heart attack...this would be

the place!

I know this may be a strange thought to have in the DAR quilt vault, but

several years ago my very best friend dropped dead in K-Mart. She would

have been mortified if she could only have known what she had done...LOL.

She was married to a very wealthy man and they belonged to all the best

private clubs in Palm Beach, but she was a real thrifty person and bought

all her underwear at K-Mart. She would go there 2 to 3 times a year to pull

what she called an *underwear raid*, but never told any of her rich

friends. Of course, they all found out.

 

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 06:00:35 -0500

From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: fabric sheen and eggs

Message-Id: <v01540b11aee80b08dc4c@[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

hmm.....what about egg tempera painting? My daughter had to make her own

egg tempera paints while studying art at GWU. Could it be the same

forumla,but without the color pigment?

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 06:19:48 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: DAR Museum

Message-ID: <961226061947_811752947@emout14.mail.aol.com>

SADIEROSE, I hope you are going to give your permission to add to Debbie's

article..OH HOW I WISH Jean was going to add your post about the 'panty

raid'..WHAT A WAY TO START MY DAY!! Who says there's a let-down the day

after Christmas?? Jean, you sure lifted MINE!! and I can't wait to read the

article..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 06:23:43 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: DAR Museum

Message-ID: <961226062342_237077537@emout13.mail.aol.com>

what I meant to say 'was add YOUR post, Jean" and for Mary, we are still

having trouble contacting your Rip &* Stitch..let us know when it is up and

running..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 06:32:25 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Mary's rip & stitch site

Message-ID: <961226063225_1788793509@emout09.mail.aol.com>

It's there, Mary..and I saw the quilts..which one is feedsack? Jane

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 09:13:26 -0500

From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: my bio

Message-Id: <v01540b26aee8383a7aa0@[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

here is my bio info for the group: I have been posting a few weeks and have

been remiss in sharing it.

Jean Ann Eitel, P. O. Box 3295,

Marietta, GA 30061

I have been quilting for 35 years. 15 of them seriously.

I am a single grandmother living in GA in a cute little cottage that I am

fixing up to suit myself. I love it. I have 7 grandchildren. the oldest is

8 years old. A baby a year has turned me into a baby quiltmaking factory.

I have five children, three of them have produced all these grandchildren.

I am a Deacon in the Episcopal church. When I am not quilting I am working

on ministry.

I am editor of QUILT magazine. I am almost always quilting, writing

articles about quilting, or taking pictures of quilts. I love having a life

centered on quilts. I just wish i had more time to sew!

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 10:53:44 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRS@mail.albany.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Nancy and Mary

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961226105119.24873674@mail.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Now, Jane, Nancy's note was fine - I am a little confused, though. She is

going to send her mother a quilt to prove she can SEW? Gee, I have a drawer

full of UFO's I would be happy to loan for that purpose...

I was able to get to Mary's page without a problem. The problem may be that

y'all need the very latest browser - I *just* downloaded Netscape 3.0 and

now I can see frames and animation and hear music.

(http://home.netscape.com/comprod/mirror/subscription/download.html) Mary

has picked very appropriate music for Snowflake Arizona. Her son Robert

designed the page - he did a nice job. I am impressed.

Is today boxing day? If so, happy, happy!

Kris

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 11:40:46 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Simply Quilts- Shelburne

Message-ID: <961226114045_1821525367@emout20.mail.aol.com>

Post Holiday Greetings, everyone!

Hope you have all survived the holidays!! Now take some time for

yourself!!

If you have access to HOME & GARDEN television, via cable or satellite

dish, the program today was about the Shelburne Museum in Vermont. There was

a short tour at the Museum, then back to the studio to stitch a 2 story house

block based on one of the quilts. The final segment featured Demetria

Zahoudanis, from RJR Fabrics, talking about the new "Sarah Johnson"

collection. Very interesting!!

I really enjoy the Simply Quilts show, with hostess Alex Anderson. They

have different guests from the quilt world. The 1/2 hour show airs on

Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 am Eastern time, repeated at 2:30 pm Eastern

time. The Tuesday show is repeated on Saturday at 1:00 pm EST, and the

Thursday show is repeated on Sunday at 4:30 pm EST.

One upcoming show I am really looking forward to will be aired Jan. 14 &

18. This show is on the Smithsonian quilts, and features Mimi Dietrich,

author of "Quilts From the Smithsonian" and "Quilts, An American Legacy".

Hope you will get to see these interesting shows!! TTYL....Karan

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 20 Dec 1996 21:21:33 -0600

From: "S. Scruggs" <sharon@2access.com>

To: SadieRose@aol.com

CC: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: January Birthdays

Message-ID: <32BB57BD.5A67@2access.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Happy Birthday to US...Happy Birthday to US! Happy Birthday..Happy

Birthday..Happy Birthday to US!

Yep, I am in there, too...January 7th is my day. A capricorn going up

the mountains with exuberance I am. <VBGR>

Sharon

--

Jim & Sharon Scruggs

sharon@2access.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 14:20:22 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Nancy and Mary

Message-ID: <961226142020_1356724964@emout18.mail.aol.com>

I LOVE MARY'S PAGE!! I LOV ETHE BLUE AND THE PURPLE COMBO..REALLY

IMPRESSIVE!!

YOU'RE RIGHT..NANCY SHOULD GET OUR QUILTS FOR PRACTICE!! YOU tell her..J

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 16:03:19 -0500 (EST)

From: aardvark@ime.net (A.A. Harkavy)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Chinese Coins Quilts

Message-Id: <199612262103.QAA29269@ime.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Delurking for a few minutes to ask a question:

I know that the Amish made quilts they called Chinese Coins, and that the

horizontally striped motif with strong vertical strips in between

horizontally pieced strips have been made by nonAmish as well. I am,

however, curious as to how the name Chinese Coins came about.

The explanation that comes to my mind is that the horizontally stacked

vertical units could represent "stacked" coins. Since that's just a notion

that makes sense to me, based on nothing more than the workings of my mind,

I hope someone can shed some light on this.

Anybody have any info?

Addy

aardvark@ime.net

--------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 18:19:59 -0800

From: all <all@styx.ios.com>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Quilt Repair

Message-ID: <32C3324F.6C59@styx.ios.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I would like to ask the members of this list for some advice on repairing

an antique quilt.

I recently acquired an old red and while penny square quilt, age and

source unknown. Each of the embroidered penny squares has a floral

motif. The embroidery is of good but not of outstanding quality. The

pieces are sewn together by machine. The quilting work is carefully

done, but again is not of great quality. The muslin backing is brought

to the front and sewn down by hand to form the binding. It is , overall,

a nice quilt, but by no means a museum piece. It was obviosuly done

carefully by someone of average ability (probably about as good I as can

do).

There is one small round hole about a quarter-inch in diameter in the red

border, and one of the muslin penny square pieces has a section along one

edge where the fabric is "separating". I don't know the technical term

of this kind of fabric problem, but it is sort of like a run in a

stocking -- the threads in one direction are more or less intact, while

the threads running in the other direction are shredded. The area of

damage here is about one-half inch by 3 inches. Otherwise the fabric is

in excellent condition and seems quite strong -- not at all fragile

I would like to repair these two damaged areas and would appreciate your

advise on the best way to do these repairs so as to do the least damage

to the quilt and give it the most protection. My inclination is to patch

both areas with matching fabric, but if there is a better, more

acceptable way to make these repairs I'd like to use it.

One other thing I should mention is that I do intend to use this quilt.

I would not give it any hard use, but I'd like to occasionally put it on

a bed as a coverlet or use it for a nap quilt, so I want to make sure

that the repairs are strong enough to stand up to some use and an

occasional washing.

If you would like to reply to me directly, I'll summarize the responses

and post them since I think this is a question that might be of interest

to several people.

(If anyone would like to guess at a date for this quilt, I'd appreciate

your input. As I said, all of the penny squares have a floral motif. If

anyone can suggest a book I could hunt down to try to date this quilt,

I'd be most grateful.)

Thank you.

Adelaide (in New York City, where Christmas Day was cold and clear and

beautiful and treated us to a magnificent sunset)

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 19:51:37 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Rose of Sharon

Message-ID: <961226195137_1222667728@emout10.mail.aol.com>

I am quite sure that I read some where that there was a tradition, or

maybe a superstition, about young girl's making a Rose of Sharon applique

quilt as a hope chest quilt or wedding quilt. What I am remembering is that

each one was to modify the design somewhat....not just copy another's

pattern, and this is why there are so many variations of this design. Some

applique designs you see frequently, almost identical. But most Rose of

Sharon types are each slightly different.

Can anyone give me a printed reference with this?? TIA....Karan

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 1996 20:18:41 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Rose of Sharon

Message-ID: <961226201840_642708017@emout01.mail.aol.com>

All I can offer on ROSE of SHARON is that no other rose has had as many

variations and all have the built up rose, stem, leaves, buds..it took on a

political flavor, as did several other desigsn, and became known as the WHIG

ROSE & DEMOCRATIC ROSE. In most cases it was the young brides "best quilt"

as it was a more involved pattern than the 9 Patch, Hole in the Barn Door,

etc..the colors of rose, mauve, reds were most common, pink being the last

color used as it was the last color made. Thru time it became difficult to

account for all the patterns due to so many variations..It is a popular block

in my lectures because all others are pieced and the ROSE of SHARON is a good

example of what would be a quilt made for special occassions..Jane

------------------------------

From: kmccoy@glenerin.com (Kay McCoy)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Quilt Histories

Message-Id: <v01530501aee9a0c5f056@[166.93.3.59]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Because of my presence on this list, I started a family fight on Christmas

Day!!! Taking to heart that I need to construct some histories for the old

quilts I have, I asked my father what year my Mom (who died last year)

started a cathedral window--he said about 1955 which I know to be

absolutely untrue by about 25 yrs! He's almost 85 and I tried not to fuss

with him too much about it--but his information was not very helpful. Then

I asked my 91 yr old aunt (who actually finished the quilt for Mother) and

she doesn't even remember doing it, although a younger aunt and Dad

confirmed she did. Then my sister chimed in to say "NO, a lady in our

church finished it."--which I also know to be untrue! Before I knew it,

everyone was arguing about this quilt! Boy, these histories sure are

difficult!!!!!

Katie in Colorado

"A Quilting Sew & Sew"

kmccoy@glenerin.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 27 Dec 1996 23:21:38 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrett@po.fast.net>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: machine quilter for chintz repro

Message-Id: <m0vdqIJ-0003j9C@fast.net>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Beth asked about sources for machine quilting a circa 1800 repro Chintz quilt,

which sounds beautiful, by the way.

Several thoughts -

1. Chintz quilts were not machine quilted since they predate 1850, the

invention date for the sewing machine.

2. At the Renwick exhibit in Washington, some of the chintz quilts were

summer spreads - just a top and back with no quilting. Especially the ones

with intricate piecing and therefore lots of thick seams. Since Beth said this

quilt is already heavy, perhaps this might be a compromise.

These are just my thoughts. I'm not trying to tell Beth what to do, just

providing options to add to the other options she recieves.

Barb in southeastern PA

(bgarrett@fast.net)

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 27 Dec 1996 23:52:56 PST

From: psiera@juno.com (Pam D Siera)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Chinese Coins

Message-ID: <19961228.004200.9742.1.PSiera@juno.com>

Could the setting of the chinese coin be I Ching layouts, representing

hexagrams? The idea is to take three coins and toss them six times.

Each time a solid vertical line or a broken in the middle line is

stacked on top of the preceding ones. It would be interesting if they

had extra meaning, even if the Amish quilters didn't realize it. But I

don't know what a chinese coin really looks like even though a nice

person tried to draw me a "net" picture. Pam

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 10:57:07 -0500

From: JQuilt@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Help!! the dilemma broadens

Message-ID: <961228105707_1688393269@emout18.mail.aol.com>

As of Christmas I am now the owner of 3 new quilting history books,

"No Time on My Hands" by Grace Snyder, "Legacy, The Story of Talula Gilbert

Bottoms and Her Quilts" by Nancilu B. Burdick and "Stitched from the Soul" by

Gladys-Marie Fry .

I also am the owner of a gift certificate for a purchase of yet another

quilting book at our local bookstore.

I have a difficult time juggling quilting and computer time during the day

and leave reading for bedtime...but

these new books are like the Sirens singing to Ulysses,calling him to the

rocks...

These Siren/books keep sending me haunting, songlike messages from beside my

bed...songs like,

"Slip into bed and read all day, who will know, we won't tell"...

But I know how long Ulysses got side tracked from returning home...

and I fear I will stay in bed reading and calling out to Dominos for Take

Out Pizza, until it I become a subject for a Talk Show on Morbid Obesity.

I can see me now ... on my bed, wrapped in a quilt, clutching my books and

empty pizza boxes,

being wheeled on to the Sally, Ricky, Geraldo, Montel,,and Rolanda Shows....

Then told, that the only hope is to join some 12 step program for BBPO..

Bed, Books,Pizza and Obesity.

I not going to, even mention the Candy Grams that I will be sending myself

for dessert.

Oh, Oh, it's too late...the songs are too enticing...I am heading for the

bedrooooooo..........m.

Jean Laino

jquilt@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 10:48:44 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28@cybertrails.com>

To: <JQuilt@aol.com>, <QHL@cue.com>

Subject: QHL: Re: Help!! the dilemma broadens

Message-Id: <199612280343.KAA13721@ cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

STOP STOP!!! We can't let you fall into such a life a decandence. I'll

save Your. What about those candy grams? Hmmmmmmmm.... What's the e-mail

address to order them from? Hmmmmmm.... How do I get in contact with

Geraldo? Do they buy us all the pizza we can eat???????? I hear the

sirens calling............... Chocolate.................

Marrrrrrrrrryyyyyyyyyy..........

mscott28@cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 12:07:03 -0800

From: "Mimi Dietrich (quilter@umbc.edu)" <mdietr1@umbc.edu>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Simply Quilts

Message-ID: <32C57DE7.DE0@umbc.edu>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi! My name is Mimi Dietrich and I LOVE reading all of the wonderful

information on this list.

Thanks to SadieRose for letting everyone know about my upcoming show on

Simply Quilts about my Smithsonian project. I taped the show in early

October. It was great fun and Alex Anderson was so gracious and easy to

work with. After it was over I could not remember a thing I said or did.

Last week I received a preview copy of the show- what a relief! I hope

you all like it!

There is a major "Historical" boo-boo in the show, so I will admit it to

you all now. The Copp Quilt was made in the late 1800's- not 1700's. I'm

surprised I could say my name with all the lights, cameras, and action

all focused on us! The "Copp Quilt" I have with me was made by a member,

Helen Johnston, who was so nice to lend it to me for the book- and she's

the "Cover GirL". I think you will enjoy the TV close-up shots of the

quilt and it's fabric! Enjoy!

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 15:58:52 -0800

From: Michele Weise <michele@peppertreestudios.com>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: family histories

Message-Id: <3.0.32.19961228155039.0068f370@mail.west.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

To Katie's post on the family fight on Christmas, I just wanted to say

thank you for sharing that. I laughed a lot. I guesss it's just a typical

thing for families to fight over small things...and I think quilt histories

are the perfect target. Thanx Katies for letting me know I'm not alone

when it comes to family disputes and irritations. Your post sounds like

the opening scene in a delightful comedy. I think you probably know more

about those quilt histories than anybody--so go for it. Only the next

generation will appreciate your work. Michele in 1/2way sunny Calif.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 19:10:56 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Help!! the dilemma broadens

Message-ID: <961228191056_1989589107@emout04.mail.aol.com>

Ok, Mary, I'll help too..you grab the pizza boxes and candy-grams so she

isn't embarrassed and I'll grab the quilt..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 19:19:17 -0800

From: Lynn and Debbie Cupp <lcupp@erols.com>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

CC: lcupp@erols.com

Subject: QHL: bio and American Memory Collection

Message-ID: <32C5E335.261C@erols.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello to my fellow list members:

Although I joined the list a little while back I am de-lurking to give

you a brief bio and share some new stuff I came across.

I am Debbie Cupp, a pushing 40 mom, nurse, and quilter. I have very

little evidence of quilting in my family but have been collecting

antique quilts for a few years. I like traditional patterns but try to be

open-mindedin my own quilting. I am active in my local guild--raffle

quilt is my 97 project.

The history and stories associated with quilting have long been favorites

of mine and I collect the books that have the state research projects.

DH gave me Lone Stars A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1836-1936 and Shared

Threads, Quilting Together Past and Present for Christmas.

If you are interested in reading quilt stories on the web, there is a

great site at the Library of Congress. The American Memory Collection

has a searchable site. I typed in *quilt* and there were many stories

that were told to WPA workers in the 30's by the people who lived them.

I enjoyed many there but don't have time to read as many as I would like.

If you are interested

http://lcweb2.loc.gov

Thanks for this list, Kris.

Debbie Cupp

Virginia Beach

Lcupp@erols.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 19:25:03 -0500

From: "James M. Welch" <hawk@csionline.com>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: what is this?

Message-ID: <32C5BA5F.2702@csionline.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi, While in Massachusetts last weekend I found what seems to be part

of a kit. Its a white background with appliqued red carnations and

green leaves with embroidered stems. It is about 3 feet across and 8

feet long. It has the dotted lines for quilting and it does say bottom

and Quilt No 7099 on one end. Anyone have any ideas on what it could be

besides a kit and any way to tell how old it is? The antique shop that

I bought it from had no idea.

Debbie in NJ

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 19:51:11 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Stitches In Time

Message-ID: <961228195110_237395209@emout03.mail.aol.com>

Here is a different sort of book to add to your reading list:

" Stitches in Time" by Barbara Michaels, a novel with an unusual applique

album quilt woven through the story. This is one of those "I can't put it

down" type books, the story line is intriguing (if a bit sinister) and the

characters are well developed. The story centers around a shop that sells

vintage clothing and textiles, and there is some discussion of restoration

and repair. The parts of the story which involve quilts and textiles are

well done. There weren't any glaring errors, which I find annoying (when a

non-quilting author uses "our" medium inaccurately). The story line also

revolves around a voodoo like curse stitched into the quilt, "weaving a

fascinating tale of suspense and the supernatural". Action takes place in

the Washington, D.C. area, around Christmas to New Year's time period, which

made my reading it now seem even eerier.

I have not read any of Barbara Michaels' novels before, but according to

the book jacket, "Stitches In Time" returns to the same characters and

setting of three of her previous books: "Ammie" "Come Home" and "Shattered

Silk". Will have to check the library for these titles, too.

Makes me want to chant "I will think happy thoughts as I stitch on each

quilt" - just in case!! Happy New Year!! Karan

 

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 19:51:01 -0500

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Help!! the dilemma broadens

Message-ID: <961228195059_1390564104@emout18.mail.aol.com>

Jean,

Well, there is a way to alleviate all the trial and tribulations you

foresee: just read your quilt books whilst you pedal away on your exercise

bike!! Then, you will have accomplished two things at once: answered the

Book Sirens song....and saved yourself from Richard Simmons at the same time

(no, I don't have anything against RS) Actually, you can burn off enough

calories to earn that pizza or maybe a hot fudge sundae!!

Or, maybe you can position that exercise bike in front of the

computer....then you could read your mail and exercise at the same time.

(Don't know how you would work the mouse, though, but maybe those lunges to

move the mouse would be extra exercise). I bet the thigh master would work

while you sit at the computer..... This is going down hill fast....time to

write about another book to add to your list...... = :0 Karan

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 19:54:24 CDT

From: josiem@tekstar.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: American Memory URL

Message-Id: <199612290154.TAA27479@perham>

<<American Memory consists of primary source

and archival materials relating to

American

culture and history. These historical

collections are the key contribution

of the

Library of Congress to the National

Digital

Library. Most of these offerings are

from the

Library's unparalleled special

collections>>.

I am afraid I didn't notice who posted the URL for this fantastic website.

Thank you, whoever it was, this is full of the most wonderful WPA writers

interviewing real people of the '30s, telling touching life stories. I will be

coming back again and again to read more.

I took the advice of the person who posted, went to

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ and in the search line typed in quilts. This site

really "bears repeating" for those of you who love to read!

And thanks again to the poster,

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: 28 Dec 96 20:55:01 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037@CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHL@cue.com" <QHL@cue.com>

Cc: Beth <qltlady10@aol.com>

Subject: QHL: Re: Storing historic textiles

Message-ID: <961229015501_75444.1037_FHQ30-2@CompuServe.COM>

Just thought I might add some to the storage pot. I have been in preservation

and historic textiles long enough to see people spend a lot of time and money

when common sense would have been a better choice.

First we need to understand what happens to historic textiles then we can

understand how to take better care of them and common sense can rule.

Actually even though environmental damage is high on the list the higher two are

ultraviolet ( exposure to sunlight) and handling.

If the piece is truly a valueable one then handling as little as possible and

storing in as large a format totally supported would be most helpful. No

exposing a textile to sunlight is very important.

The environmental issues are also important but less damaging immediately So

storing a quilt in a natural muslin bag or pillow case with no dyes or bleach

is excellent if it is in your closet of some place in your house where you live

The moisture levels and temperature levels are usually well controled in your

living space. Avoid the attic, or basement for obvious reasons. On a shelf is

better than a cardboard box Cardboard is made using highly acidic paper and

cottons especially dont do well in close proximity but by all means that is

better than without a bag

Textiles are more fragile than any other parts of our material culture and as

such we really need to protect those that we want to keep around but use those

which can safely get used up.

Ultimately we cannot save them becasue in time they disentigrate anyhow . I

personally think putting quilts on a bed fully supported not touching wood in a

room without much light where the light can be control and dogs and cats cannot

stay too long is the absolute best for quilts from the late 19th century on. I

have a little trouble saying that about those which have survived from the 18th

and early 19th century but then I do get to play curator alot.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 20:56:52 -0500

From: QRestore@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Debatable Re: Washing Quilts

Message-ID: <961228205651_1654896887@emout13.mail.aol.com>

Well, here I go, I may stir up yet more controversy about washing quilts. .

.I must respectfully disagree with the premise that "all textiles", including

quilts, "should never be washed". We've (the QHL list) discussed some of the

pros and cons of washing quilts and the proper way in which to do it. I'm

reminded of these words by Camille Dalphond Cognac; "Who owns the quilt?"

Not all quilts are of museum quality and ultimately each quilt owner must

make that decision whether to wash a quilt. As a quilt restorer, my goal is

to return a quilt to its owner so that it looks as nearly as it did

originally and ensure it be made strong enough for use. No one is suggesting

that quilts/textiles with historical significance be repaired, they obviously

should not. As Camille mentions in her book "Quilt Restoration A Practical

Guide" "Grouping all quilts together as equally precious is a current

romanticized view of quilts which denies reality" . . . .and to treat them as

if they were of equal quality defies common sense."

Quilts that are tattered, dirty or damaged also speak to our hearts. Many

quilt owners are torn and don't know what to do with them. The quilt may be

too damaged to display but our sentimental attachments to them won't allow us

to throw them away. My own personal opinion is that quilts should be enjoyed

and shared as much as possible and not stored in a box only to be taken out

on special occasions. I see nothing wrong with providing loving care for

quilts in need of cleaning or repair so that we may enjoy them.

Restoration has always existed in the art and antique world. Whether made of

wood, glass, stone or whether a painting, these objects have been restored

for cenuturies, this included cleaning surfaces. I believe common sense

would tell us that to store or display a quilt that is soiled (not stained)

and filthy would only cause more deterioration and damage.

There is a difference between conservation and restoration and the quidelines

are quite clear as to when these techniques ought to be used. To simply

state that "all textiles" should not be washed is not addressing a quilt

owner's dilema about what to do with their sentimental treasures. All of us

bear some responsibility to present proper methods when it comes to providing

TLC quilts need.

I could go on and on . . . just wanted to point out we can agree to disagree.

Now I will get down off my soapbox (sigh).

Victoria Montgomery

QRestore@aol.com

Boise, ID

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 20:12:27 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28@cybertrails.com>

To: <SadieRose@aol.com>, <QHL@cue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Help!! the dilemma broadens

Message-Id: <199612281308.UAA19641@ cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

NOW NOW Sadie Rose: Let's not get obscene mentioning that awful word

"exercise."

The next thing you know you will start talking about that ....I can't even

bring myself to say it.... you know the d.. word. D..t. Oh now I'v really

gotten myself in trouble. I swore in public. Oh Damn.

Mary

mscott28@cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 22:46:33 -0500

From: QuiltLine@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #26

Message-ID: <961228224633_1524131630@emout15.mail.aol.com>

With regards to washing/cleaning antique quilts. Although I have seen many a

quilt that can use a good bath, and those that have faired (sp) well, I need

to agree that wet washing a quilt can be......a disaster. You have to weigh

the pro's and con's. Rabbit hit the nail on the head, you can wash 10 quilts

without a problem, but the 11th......

For instance, I was helping a friend (antique quilt vendor) at a quilt show

recently, a woman who she had sold a quilt top to came in with a complaint.

She had been told by this vendor that she could safely wash this top, once

it had been made into a quilt, with the batting and quilting technique proper

to the time period. She was told to hand wash it in cold water, otherwise

using the directions on the Orvis container.

To make this long story short, the reds in this 1930's era top ran all over

the place and ruined the quilt.

Taking every precaution when attempting to wash a quilt if you must cannot be

over stated, including testing for color fastness. If possible try to find a

professional quilt cleaner. There are several around, (I know of one in

Upland, CA. if interested), and I think they can pretty much judge how wet

washing will affect an old quilt.

If you can live with it as it is, then live with it as it is.

We are all entitled to our opinions, and I am glad that the discussions on

this group are so stimulating. I wish to appologize to any one else and

again to the person who e-mailed me privately for "shouting" on this list

(using all caps). I do this sometimes when I am having a physical difficulty

with my left hand and it is hard to reach down to the shift key,(this isn't a

serious anomoly, but painful, it comes and goes). However, apparently using

all capitals was offensive at least to one person, and I had no idea that

this was against proper 'netiquette'. If anyone else was disturbed by this,

I am truly sorry (would of been all capitalized for expression, but....).

I won't post when I am having this ailment in the future. :-(

Debbie

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 23:02:50 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRS@mail.albany.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Linsey Woolsey

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961228230030.51877b46@mail.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Like Jo, I have spent a few happy hours tonight surfing the web.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ is *really* a great site. At the search line type in

quilts.

I also looked through http://ttsw.com/QuiltHistoryPage.html, which has a lot

of very interesting links, including one to Linsey-Woolsey. This is what it

had to say:

"One of the earliest fabric used in American quilts was linsey-woolsey. This

fabric consisted of a linen (or sometimes cotton) warp and a wool weft. The

name of the fabric came from the village of Linsey in sussex, England. Flax

was one of the larger crops in colonial America and linsey-woolsey was a

strong, durable fabric.

Linsey-woolsey bed covers were generally whole cloth quilts. As the quilt

wore out, usable sections were salvaged and were pieced into other quilts."

Interesting, huh? For those of you who are new to the list, I will

cut-and-paste what Rabbit had to say on the subject.

>Ok now I am really going to get myself in hot water. Textile fabric names

>Linsey-woolsey ok what do we really know? Yes cloths coming from Linsey Engalnd

>were sometimes called linsey as town names were helpful for distinguishing

>regional fabric production traditions Its use in colonial and post

revolutionary

>America is very confusing. The term was used by deToqueville in his

>discriptions of traveling in America to mean a coarse home produced fabric with

>either linen or cotton warp and singles wool filling ( weft) in solids and

>stripes always in plain weave and without much finishing. The biggest problem I

>have is that people weaving in their homes at the same time did not use the

>term "linsey-woolsey" as often as those in the 20th century. Often the

>referrences to weaving plain cloth of linen and wool were simply called " mixed

>stuff" Stuff usually equaling plain weave cloth as opposed to twills, figures,

>spot etc.

>The nice thing about using the term linsey-woolsey is that we can know it is

>plain weave and that it has cotton or linen warp and singles wool crossing it.

>So it is a good place to communicate but usually I try to find a referrence for

>a particular decade and its vernacular use, use by those weaving, and

>descriptive use by dry goods merchants etc. For example the term Fustian

changes

>almost every 10 years between 1700 and 1900. Jean which has never changed in

>description is a sub set of fustian go figure. The most important thing is

that

>we have so much surviving plain weave mixed cloth in many colors and weights

>Important though none of the surviving pieces are what I would call

irregular or

>rough textured and when people reproduce it today they often mistake a low

count

>( warp threads and weft threads per inch) for a lumpy bumpy look for

instance in

>the pieces I have in my collection the counts are usually in the high 30's to

>low 40's unless they are horse blankets which we do find so that would look

like

>a low count sheet not like a lumpy irregular texture usually the yarns are

very

>well spun and the weaving which can be problematic with linen warps is done

>well.

>

>

Kris

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 22:37:56 CDT

From: josiem@tekstar.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: American Memory URL

Message-Id: <199612290437.WAA04130@perham>

Hello again: In mentioning this Library of Congress Website and describing

WPA writers who were writing life stories of Florida squatters, and

Oklahomans making their way to California during those terrible dust bowl

days maybe some explanation is in order. For you younger

sisters (and brothers) who may not know what the WPA was, it was one

of the Franklin Roosevelt era New Deal depression recovery programs called

Works Progress Administration. It employed people from all walks of life

who couldn't find work in countless projects, and writers were

hired to interview people all over the country. John Steinbeck was a

WPA writer, as were many of his compadres of that time. I believe his

book The Grapes of Wrath came of some of these experiences.

Just so you can appreciate this website even more!

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 17:13:24 +1100 (EST)

From: Li Joo Ng <lng@bf.rmit.edu.au>

To: Posting <QHL@cuenet.com>

Subject: QHL: moth balls

Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.3.95.961229170616.12154B-100000@otto.bf.rmit.edu.au>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Thanks to Peg G for replying to my posting personally and also to Rabbit

Goody for sharing tips on storing antique quilts / textiles.

I have another question. After storing my antique quilts in pillow cases,

is it all right to throw some moth balls around the pillow cases? Or are

there better alternatives? I have had several bad experiences with moths.

They ate up my rather expensive Italian T-shirt, my favourite face towel

and a brand new never-worn pair of shorts. I do not intend to allow any

moth to come within a mile radius of my precious antique quilts.

Help - all tips and suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 06:43:43 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Linsey Woolsey

Message-ID: <961229064340_270914131@emout13.mail.aol.com>

Thanks so much for the post on Linsey Woolsey..I knew I had seen the town

Linsey on a map somewhere after having been told there was such a place..I

added Woolsey to the name as well..maybe that is why Alma couldn't find it in

her search. When you meet the many people I com in contact with at lectures,

you begin to wonder if that IS what was said..I seachjed back again in my

mind and realized I posted the town as Linsey- Woolsey.that is probably why

Alma couldn't find such a place in her home in England..thanks again for the

post..Jane

------------------------------

Date: 29 Dec 96 09:28:20 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037@CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHL@cue.com" <QHL@cue.com>

Subject: QHL: Re: soap box

Message-ID: <961229142820_75444.1037_FHQ14-1@CompuServe.COM>

it wasnt a big soap box and you certainly are right in saying who does the quilt

belong to its just that washing always runs the risk of total distruction. You

cannot be sure that when you wash something it will survive so the piece had

better be disposable. That is the problem they dont talk and say i can be washed

safely. As for torn tattered why cant we display things that are not perfect

anymore? why must it look as it did before? If it has age the age should show

not be removed. I know this is a radical thought to some but its like dying your

hair and getting face lifts pretty superficial to the real essence of a quilt.

Wear, stains, tatters are part of what happens to textiles and we can learn more

by not restoring and observing than fixing and pretending. Hows that for

disagreement and controversy obviously I am taking the extreme view here but

someone needs to so think about what the value of maing something look as it

did versus understanding it as it is now and acepting it.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 10:17:07 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRS@mail.albany.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: From a dealers perspective

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961229101442.27af4fc8@mail.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Let me offer a comment on deteriorating quilts from an antique quilt dealers

perspective. I had Rabbit's point of view when I first became a dealer.

(Still do, actually.) I felt that damage and age spots and so on were part

of the personality of a quilt and I enjoyed the not-so-perfect ones as much

as I enjoyed the perfect ones. They certainly *taught* me more! A damaged

quilt teaches you a great deal about sewing techniques, threads, batting,

foundation piecing, etc. When I first started out, I tended to prefer this

type of quilt. (Probably because I started as a restorer.) The problem is

that few people buy them. I very quickly learned that people who want a

quilt for it's monetary value only want something that is perfect. It is

QUILTERS who will take a slightly damaged piece and love it as it is, or

enjoy the restoration process. Since there are far more imperfect quilts

than perfect quilts in the world, my sales focus quickly became "quilters"

as opposed to "antiquers". I have dropped out of the antique show circuit

almost entirely now. I only do the ones where I am the more likely to

purchase than to sell.

I would be interested in other comments on this.

Kris, who is trying to remember what Yoda said.

"When 600 years old you get, look this good you will not." (?)

At 09:28 AM 12/29/96 EST, Rabbit Goody wrote:

>If it has age the age should show

>not be removed. I know this is a radical thought to some but its like dying

your

>hair and getting face lifts pretty superficial to the real essence of a quilt.

>Wear, stains, tatters are part of what happens to textiles and we can learn

more

>by not restoring and observing than fixing and pretending. Hows that for

>disagreement and controversy obviously I am taking the extreme view here but

>someone needs to so think about what the value of making something look as it

>did versus understanding it as it is now and acepting it.

>

>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 11:23:41 -0500

From: RLHlink3@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: RE: letting old quilts be old quilts

Message-ID: <961229112340_1457729765@emout20.mail.aol.com>

Hello!

I'm new here and thoroughly enjoying the discussions, including the

controversy on what to do with damaged old quilts. My 2 cents worth (and I'm

not an expert!): I rather agree with Rabbit. If it's old, let it look old.

[Now, it's true that I do cover my gray --but I still look old :-) ] I

inherited a stack of memory quilt blocks done for my Mom upon her marriage to

my Dad in the 1920's --looking all the worse for having been stored all that

time --mouse stains etc. I washed them gently, but about 50% of the stains

remain. So what? I put them all together, with one additonal block signed by

Mom, quilted it, and now am proud to show it off.

My current project is backing a 98 yr old, --gorgeous-- crazy quilt top

from my husband's side of the family and preparing it for display. It will

mean so much to his 86 yr old mother when she sees it finally finished (a

late Christmas surprise for her). The velveteens are worn (or deteriorated?)

in places. There are a couple of holes (into which I will insert similar

colored fabric), but the holes and shabby places will remain --proudly.

I understand that many people would not want to "buy" a less than "perfect"

piece. Being the perfectionist that I suspect that I am, it took some seious

thinking before I came to the conclusions that I have shared. Also, being a

penny-pincher, I am very careful about how much I spend on a damaged quilt.

Wish I didn't have to be such a pincher, but my station in life does not

leave me many $$$ to spend on such.

Question:

My next project: I recently found a set of 12 nine-patch blocks --in good

condition, nice colors, very old. The fabrics are much lighter weight than

the cottons we use today. (Much, much lighter than the cottons used in my

Mom's 1930's blocks.) What kind of fabric dare I use to set these blocks

into a quilt top for display only? I am thinking of alternating plain blocks

with the old ones perhaps. Any suggestions anyone?

Thanks to you all.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 11:27:52 -0500

From: gridgees@algorithms.com (Merry May)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #26

Message-Id: <v01510104aeec4790349e@[167.152.156.137]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Re: Debbie's "What is This?"

My best guess is that it's the bottom border of an applique quilt kit. The

kits were common back in the '30s, and are still available today (i.e.,

Herrschner's catalog).

Merry

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 11:31:49 -0500

From: PAMIAM6@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: From a dealers perspective

Message-ID: <961229113149_1189411139@emout11.mail.aol.com>

I am listening to all of you with your varying ideas on all of this. I have

been quilting old quilt tops for 20 years. Against the advice of our local

quilt shop, I put them into the wash machine on gentle and line dry. If they

should bleed, etc do it now. Some seams come apart, no big deal they can be

fixed. Of couse I am not talking about museum quality tops here, although

many have been early l900. My point is I cant work and hand quilt on these

things because generally THEY SMELL. I have never had a disaster, but I

guess one of these days I may get a surprise. Also quilt tops not being as

expensive as a completed quilt if one does disintergrate I guess it would not

be as terrible, but I still would not be happy. I love this forum, it keeps

me busy reading all your ideas. Pam in Springfield

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 12:21:21 -0500

From: QRestore@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: soap box

Message-ID: <961229122119_1222977698@emout07.mail.aol.com>

While I certainly agree there are many quilts that are too damaged and/or

stained and should be appreciated for their charm, there are just as many

that with a small amount of restoration can reduce the advancement of further

damage. Are we to ignore past generations of quilters who routinely mended,

darned, patched and created their own soloutions to preserving textiles

(vintage clothing, linens, quilts, etc.) in order to pass them on to their

children, grandchildren, etc? There is alot to be learned from those who so

carefully repaired and maintained quilts in centuries past.

Quilts made for special occasions or display were seldom used, and are in

excellant condition today. However, the majority of quilts made were well

used and yes, repaired over and over again, many by the original quiltmaker.

Quilts were made to be functional, with scarcely a thought to having it

displayed in a museum. Quilts were washed using harsh methods and beaten and

we would consider them abused today, but we are smarter today about such

methods.

How would we want our quilts to be treated years from now? To have someone

meticously and carefully repair (not change) a quilt, so that it might be

appreciated and seen, not stored, would bring me great joy. Quilts have

always been repaired, it is part our their history that has been passed down

through generations of families. True restoration does not mean removing age

from a quilt, nor does it mean altering or changing a quilt. Perhaps there

is a lack of understanding, on the part of some, about what true restoration

is.

There is admittedly, a huge gap between those who believe conservation is the

only correct solution in preserving our quilts and those who believe

restoration can be successfully used in maintaining a quilts condition. How

can we forget what our ancestors have taught us about preserving and

maintaining quilts

 

 

 

 

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 13:34:29 -0500

From: mrbill@magicnet.net (Bill Wohlfart)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: GFG quilts

Message-Id: <199612291837.NAA13497@magicnet.magicnet.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi everyone. Jeanann in Orlando, Fl., here. I love to buy old pieced

blocks at antique shows, etc. and finish them as I believe every quilter

would have wanted her quilt to be finished and admired.

I bought 10 GFG blocks about 5 years ago. They obviously went together as

some of the greatly mis-matched fabrics were in other blocks. they were

dirty and still even had the newspaper basted on the back of each little hex.

Finally, I went to my local quilt shop guru and asked her to teach me how to

paper piece so I could make a white on white (antique style) path to connect

all the blocks and finish the top. I washed them by hand and laid them on

my patio. After the birds anointed them, I washed them again and laid them

out covered.

I spent about three months (after cutting lots of brown paper hex patterns

and lots of cloth circles) hand basting and then whip-stitching everything

together.

I made a wall hanging with the ten plates staggered in rows. I hand-quilted

in each row of the "flowers" and hand-quilted "phantom flowers" in the

larger white spaces. It cam out great and it is amazing how good they all

look together, even the plaids and stripes and the orange and green hexes.

I'm glad I learned the old technique and it was very satisfying to complete

the top.

Jeanann in Orlando

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 13:54:43 -0500

From: QRestore@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Opps!

Message-ID: <961229135442_2053773550@emout11.mail.aol.com>

Sorry. . .Forgot to sign this response to Rabbit Goody's comments, so will

resend it.

While I certainly agree there are many quilts that are too damaged and/or

stained and should be appreciated for their charm, there are just as many

that with a small amount of restoration can reduce the advancement of further

damage. Are we to ignore past generations of quilters who routinely mended,

darned, patched and created their own soloutions to preserving textiles

(vintage clothing, linens, quilts, etc.) in order to pass them on to their

children, grandchildren, etc? There is alot to be learned from those who so

carefully repaired and maintained quilts in centuries past.

Quilts made for special occasions or display were seldom used, and are in

excellant condition today. However, the majority of quilts made were well

used and yes, repaired over and over again, many by the original quiltmaker.

Quilts were made to be functional, with scarcely a thought to having it

displayed in a museum. Quilts were washed using harsh methods and beaten and

we would consider them abused today, but we are smarter today about such

methods.

How would we want our quilts to be treated years from now? To have someone

meticously and carefully repair (not change) a quilt, so that it might be

appreciated and seen, not stored, would bring me great joy. Quilts have

always been repaired, it is part our their history that has been passed down

through generations of families. True restoration does not mean removing age

from a quilt, nor does it mean altering or changing a quilt. Perhaps there

is a lack of understanding, on the part of some, about what true restoration

is.

There is admittedly, a huge gap between those who believe conservation is the

only correct solution in preserving our quilts and those who believe

restoration can be successfully used in maintaining a quilts condition. How

can we forget what our ancestors have taught us about preserving and

maintaining quilts.

Food For Thought . . .

Victoria Montgomery

QRestore@aol.com

Boise, ID

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:23:59 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: soap box

Message-ID: <961229162358_643041328@emout09.mail.aol.com>

Rabbitt, I think I lean to agreeing with you..anytime I have seen stains or

soil, any marks, I feel it is part of the charm..it's there, accept it..I

keep thinking of those tops/quilts that my friend soaked for 2 weeks

(changing the water every 2 days or so..) I recall ME trying it..and now I

wonder..you know how youo flip out the top sheet when you are changing your

bed linens?? I wonder if somewhere, that owner of that top I quilted for my

friend's customer..was flipped and PRESTO..became cotton confetti!! I guess

it is all what you can live with..it would be most interesting to know HOW

the stains occurred..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:29:46 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: RE: letting old quilts be old quilts

Message-ID: <961229162945_611797335@emout10.mail.aol.com>

If you decide you want to use feedsacks..let me know..Jane in "can't make up

my mind..cold? Hot? snow? Rain..up and down.".Pgh.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:33:13 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #26

Message-ID: <961229163311_677394248@emout06.mail.aol.com>

I'm wondering if the kit is a PARAGON..that company specialized in alot of

the floral kits..there are several members in my Feedsack Club who collect

kits..migh be able to trace it down..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 17:21:20 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrett@po.fast.net>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Quilting in the WPA

Message-Id: <m0veTd0-0004ONC@fast.net>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Since the writers of the WPA - Works Project Administration - of the 1930s have

been mentioned, I wanted to tell you about a quilt project of the WPA. This

will be fairly long, but I hope you will learn about something you never knew

existed.

 

I am a member of the Variable Star Quilters of Souderton, PA, and in 1988

we began researching a State wide Museum Extension Project of the Works

Projects Administration which took place in District 2 (Philadelphia area) of

PA, involving quilts. We began because I was fortunate to find at auction 25

silk screened plates of quilt patterns. They are really pretty, and we began

investigating them. We learned that there are 30 plates in the entire

collection, and they were done in South Langhorne and Croydon, PA. The project

began in 1938 or 1939, and appears to be very localized. Less than 5 complete

sets are known to be in existance. Funding ended in January 1941, so it was a

very short lived project.

As was mentioned earlier, about 1/4 of WPA employment was in service

projects such as the Federal Writers Project, Index of American Design, and

Museum Extension Project. They were all under the Fine Arts Project which

employed out-of-work writers, artists, musicians and theater people. The

purpose of the FAP was to preserve and celebrate the traditions of American

culture of the past.

Also printed in addition to the 30 silk screened patterns was a manual

entitled "Quilts Pieced and Appliqued: Colonial and Pioneer Patchwork Quilts."

The title page says - A series of thirty color plates of authentic old pieced

and appliqued quilts showing working drawings including the cutting size and

finished size patches, together with descriptive material necessary for their

making.

Our research has led us to believe that the designs were based on Ruth

Finley's book, Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them, and

that the numerous errors indicate that the writers and artists were not

quilters. There is a high degree of comparison between the plates in Ruth's

book and the pictures of completed quilts on the WPA plates.

In 1990, the Variable Star Quilters and the Reading Public Library -

owners of one complete set of plates - reprinted the set of 30 plates and the

manual. The new manual includes history and research about the WPA and this

specific project, as well as corrections to the original manual that would

allow more satisfactory quilt construction. Members of our group made all 30

of the quilts using the patterns given - there are 16 of us so it was a

manageable project - and made the necessary corrections.

Copies of the portfolio reprint are still available - shops find it hard

to display due to its size - and if anyone would like information about this

little known piece of quilt history, please contact me. The Variable Star

Quilters are a non profit group and donate all of our money from book sales,

show prizes and quilt shows to woman and children's charities. We meet in

members homes so pay no rent, do not have expensive speakers or a newsletter,

and no administrative budget. All proceeds do go to charity.

Hope somebody found this interesting and/or informative. Happy quilting!!

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrett@fast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 15:07:36 -0500

From: "jackiem" <jackiem@ivic.net>

To: <QHL@cuenet.com>, "Quilting Heritage ListServ" <QRS@mail.albany.net>

Subject: QHL: Re: From a dealers perspective

Message-Id: <199612292322.PAA31235@ns.ivic.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I like this list, because I am interested in restoration and there are

some really good discussions going on here. Thanks to all of you for your

input and taking the time to share your expertise.

I look at quilts from the value to the owner. Several years ago, someone

asked me if I could repair an old quilt that belonged to a woman in her

late eighties, who had lost everything when her house burned down.

A neighbor rescued two quilts from a dumpster, after the insurance

adjusters tossed them out, that miraculously survived with burns & singes

on the folds and edges.

One was a large Hexagon quilt (1" hexes in a diamond setting with pink

between the diamonds) that was burned on the edges most of the damage ion

the corners, required matching a pink fabric that had faded to different

colors around the edges of the sides of the quilt. the hexagons were easy

to fix, I just made paper pieced new ones, and was able to save the entire

quilt. The backing was another thing. But I learned that if you have to

repair a back on the quilt, I used an appliquéd patch is this case, and

made sure that all of the appliqué edges ended at a quilt line, so that it

is not obvious.

The other quilt was a white with blue embroidered nursery rhymes squares

quilt (single size). The fabric used in the embroidered quilt was feedsack

and there was not enough fabric, the square was simply pieced to make it

the correct size. (I found this particular point made it much easier to

repair.) The batting was an old blanket and muslin on the back. This

quilt was badly burned on the folds and especially down the middle. A few

of the blocks were beyond repair,

Basically I removed one row of blocks and used the fabric from these

blocks to repair the rest of the quilt blocks. embroidered where necessary

and retied the quilt. I did not try to remove all of the scorched fabric,

only the fabric that was too fragile and or totally gone. The scorches

that were left simply add to the charm of the quilt. I Always save as

much of the original embroidery work as possible only cut of the burned

part added a piece to the block, then replaced embroidery.

Most of the quilts I work on are some that no one wants to touch as they

are too far gone. The quilts usually come to me with the question is "Can

you do ANYTHING with this?". I am always up to a challenge, so will

usually try. Usually prefer to mend than cut up into smaller quilts.

The Hexagon quilt was made by her mother and the embroidered quilt was

made by the owner when she was about 8 or ten years old. They are going

to her nieces. Sentimental value far exceeded the monetary value.

 

I wash quilts ONLY when necessary (TEST fabrics first.) especially if they

have never been washed. Some of the odors that are in an old quilt,

disappear with airing. If necessary to wash, I wash after the repairs

are made. If stain does not come out with a gentle washing, and I can't

replace the fabric, I leave it, If the quilt is valuable enough to pay

to have it repaired or restored. It will still be valuable even with the

stain.

If I am not sure of a quilts origin or value, I ASK someone before I

start. Some quilts cannot be restored and should only be worked on by an

expert in that particular type of repair and preservation. Most of us

will never come in contact with this type of quilt, but you never know.

I learned a lot from these quilts and these quilts started me on the road

to restoration. I have saved quilts from the cutting table and can't bear

to see them cut up. I will restore them to the point that they will

survive another generation or two and then will someday pass them on to

someone who feels the same way I do. When I need an old quilt piece for a

project, I will make a piece the size needed then clip, toss it around and

abuse it, rather than cut an old quilt up. I hope who ever inherits my

quilts will feel the same way and that my quilts as plain or as fancy as

they might be, will last for generations.

 

Just a little humor, One of the quilts I have worked of a couple of times

is a Double wedding ring quilt that was a wedding gift from the

mother-in-law. It has burns on it (cinders from the fireplace?) and they

wanted it repaired because MIL is coming to visit and they don't want her

to see it. I aired it in the garage for a couple of weeks, each time I had

it, before bringing it in the house to work on it as it smelled like a

cigarette.

--

Jackie Meunier

jackiem@ivic.net

jmeunier@juno.com

jackiem@artlover.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:10:54 -0500

From: "jackiem" <jackiem@ivic.net>

To: <QHL@cue.com>, "Merry May" <gridgees@algorithms.com>

Subject: QHL: Re:QHL Debbie's "What is This?

Message-Id: <199612292322.PAA31241@ns.ivic.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

About 2 years ago, a local quilter passed away and her husband donated her

stash to the local quilt quild not to be sold.

Members were given access to these things and were asked to donate to

hospice in her name in exchange for anything taken. There were boxes and

boxes of scraps, patterns, books and odds and ends UFO's and yardage, a

whole garage full.

In one of the boxes I found a piece as you describe that was partially

appliquéd, including a number as is on your and the word top.

Mine is a large basket with a small floral in each corner. Rummaging

through some of the other boxes, I found a couple of strips that had

similar motives that were squares, One square was appliquéd and another

was not and then there were two squares that were not done and were not

cut apart. In another box, I found two yellow strips that had 2 strips on

them. then in another box, I found all of the appliqué pieces marked and

at this time I noticed that all of these appliqué designs had flowers with

square centers.

I took all of this home and laid it out and had a full size quilt with a

large white background center piece with a large basket of flowers in

the center and flowers in each corner, with a wide yellow border on each

side of the quilt and a white square with a floral design in each corner.

What a find! All of the pieces of fabric to finish the appliqué were in

tact as whoever started the quilt only cut out the pieces as she needed

them. There were 3 missing leaves and a stems missing from one corner of

the center block which I was able to get from the scraps.

How easy it would have been to not notice all of the centers being the

same or not looked trough the box of scraps that nobody was interested in.

(I was looking for scraps to save for restoration purposes and I knew

that her collection included her mother's stash.) As the center was

nearly finished, I might have just added border or borders and used it for

a wall hanging.

I finished this Quilt Kit and hung it at our quilt show 2 years ago.

Later on while leafing through some of my old quilting magazines, I can

never throw one away. I spotted this same quilt, hanging in a booth, in

an advertisement which included an overhead view of the Houston Quilt

show.

I am sure that this would have been from the same company as the markings

you described are similar. I have not been able to find out who made the

kits yet, but am still working on it.

I have another kit that was given to me to finish which is a paragon kit.

The picture of the quilt which probably was on the front of the package

was in the box when I got it. It was passed around by different people

and when anyone saw it they decided they did not want it , so put it away

until they found someone else to give it to. When I received it, the Lady

said I want to give this to someone who will finish it.

The pieces were all cut out and not one missing, but not sorted. The

quilt is made in three strips approximately the size you described. all

of the strips have the border on top and bottom and 2 of the strips also

have the border down the side and are wider than the center strip. There

are four large paisley patterns in each strips The border has two rows of

scallops and the quilting patterns that are stamped on it are beautiful

quilted paisleys.

 

I would never have bought a quilt like this in the first place, but as I

was given this, I looked at it as a challenge and then fell in love with

it as I worked on it. I am now doing the quilting and hope to have it done

for our quilt show the end of January.

--

Jackie Meunier

jackiem@ivic.net

jmeunier@juno.com

jackiem@artlover.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 20:21:30 -0500

From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: irc channels

Message-Id: <v01540b05aeecc8df1cb3@[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

In addition to quiltchat on the internet there are several other chat

channels. I am founder of quilttalk, also on dal.net.

However, i dont think this list is the place to promote the irc chat

channels, and i have not done so as a deliberate decision. Therefore i

found the invite to the quiltchat New Year's eve party out of place in this

mail group.

i thought this was quilt heritage. what i have liked about this list is, so

far, we have stuck to the topic of the list. Quilt History and Heritage.

Can't we keep it that way. There are many other ways to promote private

endeavors other than through email to the Quilt Heritage group.

Getting off my soap box and holding up a net to catch the rotten tomatos :-)

 

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 19:56:40 -0600

From: Rose Marie Mize <rmize@ice.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: URL

Message-Id: <199612300156.TAA21662@cube.ice.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I missed the original URL posting for this WPA thread. Would someone please

post it again?

Rose Marie

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:12:54 -0500

From: Ricki Maietta <rmaietta@csrlink.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: counterpane

Message-Id: <199612300208.SAA08779@orbital.cue.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Rabbit just mentioned calling her new find a "counterpane" - as opposed to

"quilt"? I really don't know the difference - please define, as I read this

term often, & the picture just looks like a quilt to me...

Ricki in PA, trying to soak up all this wonderful info!!!

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:12:51 -0500

From: Ricki Maietta <rmaietta@csrlink.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: red & green

Message-Id: <199612300208.SAA08775@orbital.cue.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Sadie Rose asked about the Rose of Sharon pattern being a bride's quilt.

Over the years it became obvious to me that an awfully lot of the red &

green on white applique quilts from mid-1800s to early 1900 were made by

brides, or for brides. Maybe this was already known by others, but it was

sort of a "revelation" for me. I tested my theory recently when someone

donated a gorgeous Coxcombe applique to our local museum (they were calling

it a cactus pattern - but I can document coxcombe over & over) - I asked if

they knew the history of the quilt. Yep - made in 1875 by a mother & sister

for the other sister's upcoming wedding! I'm wondering if, like today,

applique wasn't just considered a step above piecing, & it has nothing to do

with red & green. What about all those gorgeous blue & white applique

quilts - some were in Albany this October at the conference (some were both

pieced & appliqued). Anyone know if the blue & whites, or other appliques,

were made specifically for brides???? Curious in PA -

Ricki

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 20:34:00 CDT

From: josiem@tekstar.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Library of Congress Site & Jean Ann's letter

Message-Id: <199612300233.UAA10852@perham>

The site you are looking for is : http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ and thanks to

whomever the original poster was. I get happy with the delete key sometimes

and don't keep info that I might like to.

I didn't get in on the chat line business but I really would like to say this

is by far the most interesting of the quilting listservs and would like to

see it stay as it is. This list being focused on the historical aspects of

quilting provides a most intrigueing spot in the day and has caused me to do

research into the WPA , a few old fabrics I have, and two old quilts as

well. If I understood Jean Ann's letter, she too hoped we stayed focused

on our quilting heritage. She won't get any tomatoes from me!

Jo in Minnesota

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:42:09 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961229214209_876491333@emout04.mail.aol.com>

Pieced quilts were much faster to make and in given areas were usually the

'utility' quilts.Time was of the essence and sometimes you will find a quilt

'in' a quilt..jsut get a top done, sew it to the other quilt or put the quilt

to be replaced inside the newer one..but the applique was quite often a young

lady's "best" quilt..a quilt where time and planning was involved..utility

quilts were often scrap quilts..an applique on the other hand might well be

fabrics bought just for this quilt..and the quilt would also be a way to show

your familyand friends the intricate stitching you could do..after all, it

was not polite to brag about your talents..heaven forbid if you would be

asked to participate in a 'show & tell'..but it would certainly be admired if

it was on your bed or as was oftenthe case. a special guest/vistitor would be

afforded the opportunity to sleep under her 'best'qujilt. The reds/greens

seemed to be very popular at one time..jsut as we have our 'craze' periods

today..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:43:45 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961229214343_1621144906@emout04.mail.aol.com>

well, how rude..I got carried away and forgot to answer one of ur

questions..in my area of Va. it was customary to go to your wedding with 12

quilts..11 everyday (utility) quitls and the 12th being our 'best' quilt and

in most cases..applique..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:42:33 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrett@po.fast.net>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: DAR

Message-Id: <m0veXhl-0004EEC@fast.net>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Jean wrote -

All I can think of when I hear /read the title DAR is...... Were there any slave

quilts in the exhibition? Jean Laino jquilt@aol.com

I was privileged to visit the DAR for their quilt workshop in December, and

yes, the docent did talk about the exquisite southern quilts being made by both

the mistress and the very talented slaves. Please keep in mind that the quilts

shown in these workshops are the "best" quilts that have survived from

different time periods - intricate piecing, applique and quilting. If you are

referring in your question to utilitarian type quilts made by slaves, I would

have to say there were none. But there weren't any utilitarian quilts made by

anyone, since this was not the focus of the workshop. Because the body of work

called Antique Quilts is so broad, a museum must of necessity decide where its

niche will be, and when viewing quilts for only 1 1/2 hours, one cannot expect

to see "all" types of quilts made in the US. I still recommend this workshop

to anyone interested in antique quilts and able to get to Washington, DC.

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrett@fast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 01:00:17 -0500

From: Laurajbr@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961230010016_438875042@emout14.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

I collect red and green floral appliqued quilts from the 1800's and have

histories on many of them, and some indeed were made as wedding quilts. But

one of my very favorite quilts, signed and dated March 15, 1850, and

presented to the maker's niece on her wedding, is predominantly orange. It

has red and green in it too. It has a heavily quilted white background with

orange Baltimore-style Fleur-de-Lis type blocks (see Elly's books) with red

centers and orange oak leaves coming out of them. The four center blocks are

more intricate and include green stems and leaves and red flower buds and in

the center of two of these blocks are the presentation inscriptions. It is a

fabulous quilt. Every time my dear friend from Black Mountain, NC, comes to

visit--she is an antique quilt dealer--she tells me to name my price and she

will buy it. But I can't part with it. I found is about 5 years ago in an

antique shop in Dade City, which is just north of Tampa.

Another interesting story about this quilt: When we were visiting my

above-mentioned friend in NC one summer, she took me to meet a friend of hers

who also collected antique quilts. As we went through her huge, varied

collection, we came across another red, green and orange appliqued quilt

signed by the same lady who made mine!!! Her name is Elizabeth Coyle and on

my quilt, she crossed out her middle name. I can't remember if she did that

on Kay's quilt or not.

Laura in Tampa

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 22:00:40 PST

From: psiera@juno.com (Pam D Siera)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Books and labels

Message-ID: <19961229.220331.3710.5.PSiera@juno.com>

Just wanted to share that I found a new copy of "Shared Threads" at

the bookstore this weekend for $7.99 @ 20% off. And I bought it because

you'all talk about it and i'm sure I'll enjoy it. One story already

brought tears to my eyesl.

I had an epiphany about the quilt labels that I'm going to do for my

family quilts. A friend has a scanner and I'd been planning on using the

family photos, old ones, that I've got on disk for a pictorial quilt.

Well, the enlightenment was to put photos of the women who made and

influenced the quilts on the labels. I'm still working in b/w and that is

appropriate for these older quilts. Any thoughts about how those heat

bonded transfers onto muslin might not be good for the quilts? Pigma

pens sound just as chancy to me but they don't have glue on them.

Letters in envelopes would be great but I really like the idea of labels.

TIA Pam in Santa Rosa

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:21:16 -0900

From: Opalka <mopalka@alaska.net>

To: QHL-Digest@cue.com

Subject: Feed Sack

Message-Id: <3.0.32.19961229212115.00693680@alaska.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I have enjoyed "listening in" to the conversations. My name is Susan, I've

lived in Alaska since 1975 and I'm originally from Tulsa. I have several

quilts, tops and blocks from my Mother's side of the family. How can I tell

which ones are made from feed sacks? I know this probably sounds like a

dumb question but, I really don't know. I do have one top that my maternal

Grandmother told me was made from feed sacks. Thank you for any input. I

enjoy hearing about the history of quilting and all aspects of quilting. I

was lucky enough to receive "Stitched from the Soul" and "Mennonite

Quilts" for Christmas. Happy Holidays from Alaska where it is 0 degrees

and no new snow this week.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 01:26:39 -0500

From: RLHlink3@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: RE: letting old quilts be old quilts

Message-ID: <961230012638_812383602@emout08.mail.aol.com>

My face is red: I just realized that I did not sign my earlier response ("let

old quilts be old quilts") to Rabbit's comments. I am enjoying very much, and

learning a lot from, these discussions. Thanks to you all.

Linda in Redding CA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 01:42:02 -0500

From: RLHlink3@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Books and labels

Message-ID: <961230014200_405324312@emout13.mail.aol.com>

What a neat idea to put the maker's photo on the quilt label! I'll be

listening to hear any comments re: adverse effects from the photo process.

Linda/Redding CA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 07:57:04 -0500

From: AJSNGS@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Old quilts

Message-ID: <961230075704_1524289086@emout16.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

As some of you already know, I am very new to the world of quilting, and

relatively new to collecting old ones. I have several very "ratty" looking

quilts--in other words they are not perfect and lots of people would not like

them. For instance, I recently bought a lovely 1900 Irish chain. It is

mostly blue and white with a little bit of red in it. I love the colors in

this quilt despite the fact that a good bit of the fabric is plain ol

deteriorating, and the part of the quilt that I don't have showing has a big

ole hole in it! But when you walk into the room, there it sits lovely and

bright despite it's imperfections, and obvious age. I hope that I will look

like this when I am in my 90s too! Part of what draws me to older quilts is

the sense of history behind them. I have heard several of you say (and I

agree) "if only they could talk!". All of these quilts were new once but it

is "the life they've led" that has brought them to where they are now. Some

have led a cushy life, and some have led a life of hard work which is exactly

what they were intended to do. I don't think that we necessarily need to

restore all quilts, but sometimes repairs will help keep them around a little

bit longer for us to enjoy.

Just my 2 cents worth from a newbie. Thanks for listening.

Nancy in balmy Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:01:22 -0500

From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: WPA Thread

Message-Id: <v01540b0baeed6d5bc1d4@[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I missed the original URL posting for this WPA thread. Would someone please

post it again?

Rose Marie

I mussed the orignal too...i am very interested. wwe spend a week every

summer in an old CCC camp in NC...it has been modernized, but there is so

much up in tha appalachians to do with the wpa and ccc, but not much

accessible history that i can find.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:44:19 -0500

From: AJSNGS@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: WPA Thread

Message-ID: <961230084419_1591393533@emout01.mail.aol.com>

Jean Ann,

Where is the old CCC camp? How do you find out about places like that? I

live in Virginia and the CCC built the Skyline Drive in the mountains here.

I'm very interested in all of this too.

Please e-mail me if you can help me out with information. Thanks,

Nancy in Va.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:52:53 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961230085251_2020323907@emout20.mail.aol.com>

Laura, that is amazing..where did you find YOUR quilt made by the same lady?

It's amazing where fabrics and quilts have traveled..and I was surprised

about the mix of red and orange..to heighten how what was poular at the

time..wasn't there a period where purple was the rage? Mid or late 1800"s??

And the Crazy quilt was oh so popular for awhile as well..I can't recall who

posted about crazy quilts but I know of a lady in the DC area who is an

expert on them and teaches that style..Jane of THE FEEDSACK CLUB

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:57:18 -0500

From: AJSNGS@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Sorry again!

Message-ID: <961230085717_1755736337@emout10.mail.aol.com>

Well I didn't mean to post my last note to Jean Ann to the whole list,

although there might be others who are interested. Sorry!

Also, I have misplaced my address for the the WPA online information. Would

you please post it again for those of us who can't remember it?

Thanks very much,

Nancy in Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:59:44 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Feed Sack

Message-ID: <961230085943_1457848527@emout16.mail.aol.com>

SUSAN, feedsacks have a particular look and texture. If you send me your

snail mail address I will be happy to send you some samples of feedsacks for

you to distinguish the materials. The most common feedsacks will have a

slightly coarser feel..altho there are sacks that are as nice as any percale

you would put on your bed today..these held flour, sugar, salt, any product

that could 'sift' thru..so the thread count was high givng it a tighter

weave. If they were storing nuts/ apples/ beans/ anything larger..they weave

could be looser. What size squares would you like? Then you'lll have them

to play with..Jane of THE FEEDSACK CLUB

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 09:22:44 -0500

From: "James M. Welch" <hawk@csionline.com>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Paragon kits?????

Message-ID: <32C7D034.6067@csionline.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Jackie, Merry and Jane,

Thanks for your insights. I have another question. What are paragon

kits?

 

I took the appliqued piece to my weekly quilt group, the QE 2 girls

(Quilt and Eat Too!) and they had some ideas on how to finish it into

something usuable. Its really too big for a table topper, and with

three teenagers and one table, there is no way I would put it on there

anyway!, but it is not big enough as is for any size quilt, too long and

skinny. One suggestion was to add patchwork to it on either side in red

and greens, another was to make two other panels the same as the one I

have but I would really like to find out what the whole thing was

supposed to look like before I do anything. What are the chances of

finding out? Pretty good? A million to one?

Debbie in NJ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 10:24:12 -0500

From: Laurajbr@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961230102411_1722185567@emout02.mail.aol.com>

Jane and anyone else interested<

I found my orange, red and green wedding quilt in an antique shop in Dade

City, Florida--a wonderful little town full of antique stores, a quilt shop

and the world's greatest restaurant, about a 45-minute drive from Tampa. You

feel like you've stepped back into the 1950's when you spend a day up there.

The shopkeepers and townspeople all know each other and after a few visits,

they know us visitors too. The shop I found my quilt is no longer in business

but it was called Lady Anne's and it was mainly Victorian antiques, beautiful

furniture, flower arrangements, and there, hanging on the back wall, was MY

quilt. It was love at first sight and for me, one of my greatest finds (which

was confirmed by my friend, the antique quilt dealer.)

The other quilt made by the same lady is in Black Mountain, North Carolina.

That is also a wonderul little town and well worth a visit if you are passing

through the NC mountains. It's just east of Asheville. I find some wonderful

antique quilts there and all over the mountains. Kay does not remember when

she found her quilt or where. If you could see her collection, you'd

understand why. she must have 300 quilts, including a Baltimore album, one

from the late 1700's, and many, many more.

I would love to know how our two quilts came into being and how they became

separated, but at least I do know when mine was made and who it was for. I

guess I won't find out why Elizabeth Coyle crossd out her middle name. It

must have had some powerful memories associated with it for her to do that on

this masterpiece.

As for colors in these quilts, red and green appliques were very popular in

the mid 1800's and they often used yellow or orange as an accent color. In

this quilt, though, the orange is the predominant color and the reds and

greens are the accent colors. I do have one other orange quilt. It is an

appliqued one, of course, and it's baskets with flowers. The quilting is

spectacular, as it often was during that time, and even though it is not my

usual red and green, I couldn't resist it. (either...)

Laura in Tampa

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 09:05:00 PST

From: jadavis@juno.com (Julie A Davis)

To: quiltopia@stgenesis.org, kaffee-klatsch@quilter.com

Cc: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Hello.......

Message-ID: <19961230.093223.17822.0.jadavis@juno.com>

Hello out there......

We went to my home town to see my Mom and Dad and Mother-in-law etc....

from Christmas Eve. to yesterday afternoon...... when I finally had a

minute last

night to check my mail I had 798 messages! It took me about 2 1/2 hours

to go

through them and I deleted many! wew! It was really kinda funny to read

the

messages from the 24th and compare them to the 26th etc...... everyone on

all of

the lists that I'm on were so frantic and rushed and then were so calm

and already

planning Christmas '97! Ha!!! :-)

I did get one sewing/quilting related gift from a friend -- a book called

"501 Quilt

Blocks" by Better Homes & Gardens -- It's a beautiful hard back book and

the

pictures etc. are beautiful.... can't wait to have the time to really dig

into it!

Well............... I hope you all had a Merry Christmas and have a Happy

New Year!

Julie Davis

jadavis@juno.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 10:54:45 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: WPA Thread

Message-ID: <961230105439_1524305960@emout18.mail.aol.com>

Nancy, I THINK she said the camp was in NC..or did I read it wrong??J

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 96 11:10:56 PST

From: John & Cinda Cawley <cawley@epix.net>

To: Ricki Maietta <rmaietta@csrlink.net>, QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: RE: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <Chameleon.961230112643.cawley@.epix.net>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=us-ascii

I'm interested in the quilt Ricki mentioned that was donated to the museum.

I have seen quilts in a pattern I would have called coxcomb referred to by

the owner as cactus. Brackman cites cactus as a name for this pattern

(Encyclopedia of Applique, p. 80). Lasansky shows one (Pieced by Mother, p.

53), as does the Berks Co. Quilt Harvest (Historical Review of Berks County,

Winter 92-93, p. 16). I am increasingly reluctant to give names to 19th

century patterns unless we know what the maker called that particular quilt.

We seem compelled to retroactively impose our terminology (which is

necessary for contemporary "quilt people" to understand each other) on a

period of creative chaos.

Cinda in Scranton

-------------------------------------

Name: John & Cinda Cawley

E-mail: cawley@epix.net

Date: 12/30/96

Time: 11:10:56 AM

This message was sent by Chameleon

-------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 12:15:25 -0500

From: RBCochran@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Two Don't Miss Experiences

Message-ID: <961230121525_1290204601@emout08.mail.aol.com>

First of all, I want to say how delighted I am to find this site. I can

already see more computer hours spent online, esp. the WPA project info.

Thanks to everyone for sharing.

Secondly, I'd like to recommend two quilting-related experiences not to be

missed. If you possibly can, you should see the quilts from the Patricia

Smith collection being exhibited at the Renwick in D.C. They are stunning.

Plus there's fabric yardage exhibited in cases. I think the show runs

through mid-January, so you'll have to hurry. If you can't make it, though,

I understand a book is coming out in March or April 1997. I hope so, because

we couldn't take photos. (Didn't think to ask for permission ahead of time.)

The other thing you should do is to take the workshop at the DAR. I, too,

was there in December. To sign up, just call them. I think they run one on

the first Thursday of every month. But plan ahead because they limit the

group to 20 at the most. Cost is $15. You never know which ones they'll be

showing, but all we saw were interesting. You can photo here, only if you

ask for permission ahead, and I would imagine only non-flash.

Looking forward to more info exchange and wishing all a happy new year.

 

Rachel in NJ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 09:28:58 -0800

From: Michele Weise <michele@peppertreestudios.com>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: making heat-transfer labels

Message-Id: <3.0.32.19961230092739.0069d5d0@mail.west.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi all, I can't find who asked about making labels so I'll address the

group... In regards to heat transfer labels...speaking as a framer, the

basic rule of thumb in conservation framing is: Do not change the original

artwork in any way by adding heat activated substances such as glues, tapes

etc. The idea being that you should be able to easily move the original

artwork from one frame or storage place to another without the artwork

being changed in any way, staying as close to its original condition as

possible.

That is why framers have no hesitation using heat-transfer sheets to

adhere posters to foam core, whereas they would never heat transfer a

limited edition fine art print or any original--on paper, fabric, or any

other material. Adhesion would immediately render the value of an art

print to zero. In our trade, we have something called a T mount which lets

you hold a piece in place without letting any adhesive or acid bearing

material touch the piece. Heat transer paper, (which I use all the time

for many things because I love it) has many uses but not in conservation

matting and mounting. Thin sheets of tissue/type paper are dotted with

very tiny spots of heat-activated adhesives. The adhesives range from lo

tack to hi tack. Basically, you have seen something like these in fabric

stores and it's called "Heat & Bond" tissue. Most manufactureres give

directions saying that their adhesives can be removed by reheating the

artwork and softening the adhesive and peeling it away from the sheet.

This is very seldom successful and all manufacturers with also give

disclaimers because unless the whole sheet is heated to exactly the same

temperature, and peeled off quickly, some dots of adhesive will

cool--hence, you will be caught stressing the artwork by pulling and

stretching it, and heaven forbit, tearing it.

However, after having said all this about heat transfer processes, I

would personally feel very at ease using a heat transfer label on an

antique quilt IF the label was treated as a separate piece, layered to the

quilt with a small separator of either plain cotton or acid free tissue and

hand stitched to the quilt. These adhesives that are being held between

your photo emulsion and the backing muslin, I believe would not harm the

quilt in any way because they would not be touching the quilt, and would be

in a healthy aired environment--not locked up in plastic or other

detramental atmosphere.

Good luck and I think your idea is really wonderful. Michele

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 18:38:10 -0500 (EST)

From: "Carol L. O'Neill" <coneill@CapAccess.org>

To: RBCochran@aol.com

cc: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Renwick Exhibit +++++

Message-ID: <Pine.SUN.3.91-FP.961230182544.18356B-100000@cap1.capaccess.org>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Saw the Renwick exhibit yesterday and certainly agree with Rachel that it

was stunning! Loved all the quilts, and was intrigued by Baptist Fan

quilting on one of them, dated 1830s. Have never thought about the

origin of actual quilting patterns...somehow assumed crosshatching and

squares and diamonds were used in older times. Know of any book with

info on this?

My favorite in the show was a sunflower quilt in bright yellow and

blues. Center of the flowers was a square with elongated corners, set

sometimes one way and sometimes the other, giving the flowers a carefree

feeling. It was random, but I bet the quilter did it intentionally. She

also had an interesting border treatment, using a fabric with a wide

stripe. She didn't try to miter the corners to match, but stopped them

6" or so short of the edge and added a piece of the same fabric cut on

the bias. Definitely an idea to put in my memory bank!

Really enjoy reading on here about the various views from those of you

who are restorers and other experts. I'm especially interested in

salvaging utilitarian quilts. "Time-Span Quilts" (can't remember the

author) is one of my most favorite of all quilt books. Bought a terribly

cut-up strip-pieced quilt from the 30's, took it apart in chunks, sewed

it back together and made it the central medallion of a quilt that is now

a joy to me. Have a feeling the original maker would be pleased (and

maybe relieved!).

Happy new year to you-all, and wishes for lots of wonderful finds!

--Carol in VA

(coneill@capaccess.org)

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 96 20:51:55 EST

From: "Bob Mills" <decision@tigger.jvnc.net>

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #27

Message-Id: <decision.1202384755A@tigger.jvnc.net>

Intro, washing qlts, tomatoes

Hi All,

I've been reading for a few weeks and would like to introduce myself. I am

Jan Drechsler (not Bob), and have been a quiltmaker for 27 years and have

coordinated community participation quilts, as well as made dozens of

squares for community quilts. I have been a seamstress for longer than

that, and several years ago made 67 cotton dance dresses to sell so I have

tons of scraps of cotton. I am a musician (pianist) for traditional New

England Contra dances which are danced to jigs and reels, and I also call or

teach those dances.

I bought a Bernina 1090 last year and I only wonder why I fought my cheap

1960's Singer for so long. Until I sat down at my Bernina, I realized that

3/4 of my sewing energy had been directed at my old machine. The Bernina

just did what I asked it too. No more swearing at the machine. I am not

affiliated with Bernina, just a happy owner.

My other interest is old sewing machines. While I was happy when my '60's

Singer died, I was recently given my grandmother's treasured 1913 Singer

model 15 treadle, which my dad electrified in the 40's. I also found a

Singer 99 at a flea market, bought a great Singer 201 and found two

featherweights at bargain prices. I am just organizing New Jersey's first

get-together of featherweight fanatics and old sewing machine collectors.

Contact me if you are interested. There is a subscribed group of machine

collectors and sewers and repairers, to join write Sue@ttsw.com. That's it

for my unlurking info.

I have been reading rec.textiles.quilting and sewing and the Bernina

newsgroup for 1 1/2 years and am quite tired of chit-chat about Christmas

sewing and kitty quilts and 'What are you making now?' chat. I don't learn

much from the groups except occasionally a tip about Berninas. No Tomato

Tossing from me Jean!! Hooray for you for saying 'Let's keep this group

focused.'

I have been thinking about the discussions surrounding washing and 'fixing

up' old quilts. I don't think that there is only one right answer. If we

are talking about a museum quality quilt-then I wouldn't dream of washing it

in my bathtub or anywhere else. And pulling off and replacing worn fabric

is also a sin.

But let's talk about the kind of quilt that many of us are likely to own.

In fact, let's talk about my grandmother's basket pieced quilt, in which

many of the triangle points were sewn into the seams, in which the quilting

stitches were small on the front and huge on the back, in which the front

border was wrapped around to the back instead of a binding, and in which not

one corner was square.

I just finished a fix- up project on this quilt that my grandmother made for

my mom and dad in the 50's. It was ruined at a cleaner's- faded the fabrics

and made huge lumps of the cotton batting inside, so one could see thru the

quilt in places and feel the lumps in others. My mom then gave it to me

when we were first married and then there was the leaky waterbed incident.

Yucky waterstains.

I then put it in the attic for 22 years, which didn't help preserve it. It

took me all those years to decide to destroy part of grandma's work in order

to enjoy the rest of her work. This fall, I picked out the yards and yards

of hand quilting, pulled off about 300 french knots, and took out all the

batting. I defied all quilting common sense and scrubbed it with Shout and

threw it in the washer with Tide and it came out clean and pretty. The

colors weren't any more faded after that rough treatment and it has a

charming old soft pastel look. I did the same to the water stained muslin

backing in order to re-use it. I put new Warm and Natural batting in it,

machine quilted the squares and took it to N. Carolina at Christmas to

offer it to my mom. I bet my husband that she would say, 'Oh, that old

thing-I don't want it.' Instead she said 'I always wondered what had

happened to that quilt. I would love to have it back!' Fortunately, I

never bet money. It is on mom's bed now and looks beautiful. After the

winter, I will handquilt some of it and re do the French knots. This quilt

was made to be used.

Last October, I found a large wool one patch, of 4 inch squares for $12. I

barely even looked at it before grabbing it, believing that any quilt is

worth more than $12. When I got home and looked at it closer, I thought

that maybe I had paid $11.99 too much for it! Many of the squares are moth

eaten, some of the squares are shredded tapistry, none of the squares meet

or match seams, it looks like a 6 year old's stitching and the backing had

stains suggesting multiple childbirths. Oh, it also smelled and the cotton

batting was in lumps. I decided to pick out the ties and remove the

batting. I removed the backing and tried to wash out the stains, to no

avail. Although the backing was seriously faded in places, it had once been

a lovely rose large flowered print. I washed the top (gasp) in woolite in

my machine on delicate and lay it flat to dry.

One of my future projects will be to replace some of the wool squares and

reback it with an old looking sampler flannel- which cost twice as much as

the whole quilt. It will not be perfect, nor do I want to replace all the

damaged squares. But it will go on a bed and be warm and functional and

charming.

So I think that the quilt itself has to be considered before one says never

wash it or clean it up. Each quilt has it's own answer and value, whether

it be monitary, historical or sentimental. And the care will depend on that

value.

Oh... this is long, sorry to be so long-winded the first time I write. I

promise I will listen more and write less. And I am very glad to read these

discussions.

Jan in NJ

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 20:12:27 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28@cybertrails.com>

To: <SadieRose@aol.com>, <QHL@cue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Help!! the dilemma broadens

Message-Id: <199612281308.UAA19641@ cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

NOW NOW Sadie Rose: Let's not get obscene mentioning that awful word

"exercise."

The next thing you know you will start talking about that ....I can't even

bring myself to say it.... you know the d.. word. D..t. Oh now I'v really

gotten myself in trouble. I swore in public. Oh Damn.

Mary

mscott28@cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 22:46:33 -0500

From: QuiltLine@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #26

Message-ID: <961228224633_1524131630@emout15.mail.aol.com>

With regards to washing/cleaning antique quilts. Although I have seen many a

quilt that can use a good bath, and those that have faired (sp) well, I need

to agree that wet washing a quilt can be......a disaster. You have to weigh

the pro's and con's. Rabbit hit the nail on the head, you can wash 10 quilts

without a problem, but the 11th......

For instance, I was helping a friend (antique quilt vendor) at a quilt show

recently, a woman who she had sold a quilt top to came in with a complaint.

She had been told by this vendor that she could safely wash this top, once

it had been made into a quilt, with the batting and quilting technique proper

to the time period. She was told to hand wash it in cold water, otherwise

using the directions on the Orvis container.

To make this long story short, the reds in this 1930's era top ran all over

the place and ruined the quilt.

Taking every precaution when attempting to wash a quilt if you must cannot be

over stated, including testing for color fastness. If possible try to find a

professional quilt cleaner. There are several around, (I know of one in

Upland, CA. if interested), and I think they can pretty much judge how wet

washing will affect an old quilt.

If you can live with it as it is, then live with it as it is.

We are all entitled to our opinions, and I am glad that the discussions on

this group are so stimulating. I wish to appologize to any one else and

again to the person who e-mailed me privately for "shouting" on this list

(using all caps). I do this sometimes when I am having a physical difficulty

with my left hand and it is hard to reach down to the shift key,(this isn't a

serious anomoly, but painful, it comes and goes). However, apparently using

all capitals was offensive at least to one person, and I had no idea that

this was against proper 'netiquette'. If anyone else was disturbed by this,

I am truly sorry (would of been all capitalized for expression, but....).

I won't post when I am having this ailment in the future. :-(

Debbie

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 23:02:50 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRS@mail.albany.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Linsey Woolsey

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961228230030.51877b46@mail.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Like Jo, I have spent a few happy hours tonight surfing the web.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ is *really* a great site. At the search line type in

quilts.

I also looked through http://ttsw.com/QuiltHistoryPage.html, which has a lot

of very interesting links, including one to Linsey-Woolsey. This is what it

had to say:

"One of the earliest fabric used in American quilts was linsey-woolsey. This

fabric consisted of a linen (or sometimes cotton) warp and a wool weft. The

name of the fabric came from the village of Linsey in sussex, England. Flax

was one of the larger crops in colonial America and linsey-woolsey was a

strong, durable fabric.

Linsey-woolsey bed covers were generally whole cloth quilts. As the quilt

wore out, usable sections were salvaged and were pieced into other quilts."

Interesting, huh? For those of you who are new to the list, I will

cut-and-paste what Rabbit had to say on the subject.

>Ok now I am really going to get myself in hot water. Textile fabric names

>Linsey-woolsey ok what do we really know? Yes cloths coming from Linsey Engalnd

>were sometimes called linsey as town names were helpful for distinguishing

>regional fabric production traditions Its use in colonial and post

revolutionary

>America is very confusing. The term was used by deToqueville in his

>discriptions of traveling in America to mean a coarse home produced fabric with

>either linen or cotton warp and singles wool filling ( weft) in solids and

>stripes always in plain weave and without much finishing. The biggest problem I

>have is that people weaving in their homes at the same time did not use the

>term "linsey-woolsey" as often as those in the 20th century. Often the

>referrences to weaving plain cloth of linen and wool were simply called " mixed

>stuff" Stuff usually equaling plain weave cloth as opposed to twills, figures,

>spot etc.

>The nice thing about using the term linsey-woolsey is that we can know it is

>plain weave and that it has cotton or linen warp and singles wool crossing it.

>So it is a good place to communicate but usually I try to find a referrence for

>a particular decade and its vernacular use, use by those weaving, and

>descriptive use by dry goods merchants etc. For example the term Fustian

changes

>almost every 10 years between 1700 and 1900. Jean which has never changed in

>description is a sub set of fustian go figure. The most important thing is

that

>we have so much surviving plain weave mixed cloth in many colors and weights

>Important though none of the surviving pieces are what I would call

irregular or

>rough textured and when people reproduce it today they often mistake a low

count

>( warp threads and weft threads per inch) for a lumpy bumpy look for

instance in

>the pieces I have in my collection the counts are usually in the high 30's to

>low 40's unless they are horse blankets which we do find so that would look

like

>a low count sheet not like a lumpy irregular texture usually the yarns are

very

>well spun and the weaving which can be problematic with linen warps is done

>well.

>

>

Kris

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 1996 22:37:56 CDT

From: josiem@tekstar.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: American Memory URL

Message-Id: <199612290437.WAA04130@perham>

Hello again: In mentioning this Library of Congress Website and describing

WPA writers who were writing life stories of Florida squatters, and

Oklahomans making their way to California during those terrible dust bowl

days maybe some explanation is in order. For you younger

sisters (and brothers) who may not know what the WPA was, it was one

of the Franklin Roosevelt era New Deal depression recovery programs called

Works Progress Administration. It employed people from all walks of life

who couldn't find work in countless projects, and writers were

hired to interview people all over the country. John Steinbeck was a

WPA writer, as were many of his compadres of that time. I believe his

book The Grapes of Wrath came of some of these experiences.

Just so you can appreciate this website even more!

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 17:13:24 +1100 (EST)

From: Li Joo Ng <lng@bf.rmit.edu.au>

To: Posting <QHL@cuenet.com>

Subject: QHL: moth balls

Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.3.95.961229170616.12154B-100000@otto.bf.rmit.edu.au>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Thanks to Peg G for replying to my posting personally and also to Rabbit

Goody for sharing tips on storing antique quilts / textiles.

I have another question. After storing my antique quilts in pillow cases,

is it all right to throw some moth balls around the pillow cases? Or are

there better alternatives? I have had several bad experiences with moths.

They ate up my rather expensive Italian T-shirt, my favourite face towel

and a brand new never-worn pair of shorts. I do not intend to allow any

moth to come within a mile radius of my precious antique quilts.

Help - all tips and suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 06:43:43 -0500

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Linsey Woolsey

Message-ID: <961229064340_270914131@emout13.mail.aol.com>

Thanks so much for the post on Linsey Woolsey..I knew I had seen the town

Linsey on a map somewhere after having been told there was such a place..I

added Woolsey to the name as well..maybe that is why Alma couldn't find it in

her search. When you meet the many people I com in contact with at lectures,

you begin to wonder if that IS what was said..I seachjed back again in my

mind and realized I posted the town as Linsey- Woolsey.that is probably why

Alma couldn't find such a place in her home in England..thanks again for the

post..Jane

------------------------------

Date: 29 Dec 96 09:28:20 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037@CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHL@cue.com" <QHL@cue.com>

Subject: QHL: Re: soap box

Message-ID: <961229142820_75444.1037_FHQ14-1@CompuServe.COM>

it wasnt a big soap box and you certainly are right in saying who does the quilt

belong to its just that washing always runs the risk of total distruction. You

cannot be sure that when you wash something it will survive so the piece had

better be disposable. That is the problem they dont talk and say i can be washed

safely. As for torn tattered why cant we display things that are not perfect

anymore? why must it look as it did before? If it has age the age should show

not be removed. I know this is a radical thought to some but its like dying your

hair and getting face lifts pretty superficial to the real essence of a quilt.

Wear, stains, tatters are part of what happens to textiles and we can learn more

by not restoring and observing than fixing and pretending. Hows that for

disagreement and controversy obviously I am taking the extreme view here but

someone needs to so think about what the value of maing something look as it

did versus understanding it as it is now and acepting it.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 10:17:07 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRS@mail.albany.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: From a dealers perspective

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961229101442.27af4fc8@mail.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Let me offer a comment on deteriorating quilts from an antique quilt dealers

perspective. I had Rabbit's point of view when I first became a dealer.

(Still do, actually.) I felt that damage and age spots and so on were part

of the personality of a quilt and I enjoyed the not-so-perfect ones as much

as I enjoyed the perfect ones. They certainly *taught* me more! A damaged

quilt teaches you a great deal about sewing techniques, threads, batting,

foundation piecing, etc. When I first started out, I tended to prefer this

type of quilt. (Probably because I started as a restorer.) The problem is

that few people buy them. I very quickly learned that people who want a

quilt for it's monetary value only want something that is perfect. It is

QUILTERS who will take a slightly damaged piece and love it as it is, or

enjoy the restoration process. Since there are far more imperfect quilts

than perfect quilts in the world, my sales focus quickly became "quilters"

as opposed to "antiquers". I have dropped out of the antique show circuit

almost entirely now. I only do the ones where I am the more likely to

purchase than to sell.

I would be interested in other comments on this.

Kris, who is trying to remember what Yoda said.

"When 600 years old you get, look this good you will not." (?)

At 09:28 AM 12/29/96 EST, Rabbit Goody wrote:

>If it has age the age should show

>not be removed. I know this is a radical thought to some but its like dying

your

>hair and getting face lifts pretty superficial to the real essence of a quilt.

>Wear, stains, tatters are part of what happens to textiles and we can learn

more

>by not restoring and observing than fixing and pretending. Hows that for

>disagreement and controversy obviously I am taking the extreme view here but

>someone needs to so think about what the value of making something look as it

>did versus understanding it as it is now and acepting it.

>

>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 11:23:41 -0500

From: RLHlink3@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: RE: letting old quilts be old quilts

Message-ID: <961229112340_1457729765@emout20.mail.aol.com>

Hello!

I'm new here and thoroughly enjoying the discussions, including the

controversy on what to do with damaged old quilts. My 2 cents worth (and I'm

not an expert!): I rather agree with Rabbit. If it's old, let it look old.

[Now, it's true that I do cover my gray --but I still look old :-) ] I

inherited a stack of memory quilt blocks done for my Mom upon her marriage to

my Dad in the 1920's --looking all the worse for having been stored all that

time --mouse stains etc. I washed them gently, but about 50% of the stains

remain. So what? I put them all together, with one additonal block signed by

Mom, quilted it, and now am proud to show it off.

My current project is backing a 98 yr old, --gorgeous-- crazy quilt top

from my husband's side of the family and preparing it for display. It will

mean so much to his 86 yr old mother when she sees it finally finished (a

late Christmas surprise for her). The velveteens are worn (or deteriorated?)

in places. There are a couple of holes (into which I will insert similar

colored fabric), but the holes and shabby places will remain --proudly.

I understand that many people would not want to "buy" a less than "perfect"

piece. Being the perfectionist that I suspect that I am, it took some seious

thinking before I came to the conclusions that I have shared. Also, being a

penny-pincher, I am very careful about how much I spend on a damaged quilt.

Wish I didn't have to be such a pincher, but my station in life does not

leave me many $$$ to spend on such.

Question:

My next project: I recently found a set of 12 nine-patch blocks --in good

condition, nice colors, very old. The fabrics are much lighter weight than

the cottons we use today. (Much, much lighter than the cottons used in my

Mom's 1930's blocks.) What kind of fabric dare I use to set these blocks

into a quilt top for display only? I am thinking of alternating plain blocks

with the old ones perhaps. Any suggestions anyone?

Thanks to you all.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 11:27:52 -0500

From: gridgees@algorithms.com (Merry May)

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #26

Message-Id: <v01510104aeec4790349e@[167.152.156.137]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Re: Debbie's "What is This?"

My best guess is that it's the bottom border of an applique quilt kit. The

kits were common back in the '30s, and are still available today (i.e.,

Herrschner's catalog).

Merry

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 11:31:49 -0500

From: PAMIAM6@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: From a dealers perspective

Message-ID: <961229113149_1189411139@emout11.mail.aol.com>

I am listening to all of you with your varying ideas on all of this. I have

been quilting old quilt tops for 20 years. Against the advice of our local

quilt shop, I put them into the wash machine on gentle and line dry. If they

should bleed, etc do it now. Some seams come apart, no big deal they can be

fixed. Of couse I am not talking about museum quality tops here, although

many have been early l900. My point is I cant work and hand quilt on these

things because generally THEY SMELL. I have never had a disaster, but I

guess one of these days I may get a surprise. Also quilt tops not being as

expensive as a completed quilt if one does disintergrate I guess it would not

be as terrible, but I still would not be happy. I love this forum, it keeps

me busy reading all your ideas. Pam in Springfield

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 12:21:21 -0500

From: QRestore@aol.com

To: QHL@cue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: soap box

Message-ID: <961229122119_1222977698@emout07.mail.aol.com>

While I certainly agree there are many quilts that are too damaged and/or

stained and should be appreciated for their charm, there are just as many

that with a small amount of restoration can reduce the advancement of further

damage. Are we to ignore past generations of quilters who routinely mended,

darned, patched and created their own soloutions to preserving textiles

(vintage clothing, linens, quilts, etc.) in order to pass them on to their

children, grandchildren, etc? There is alot to be learned from those who so

carefully repaired and maintained quilts in centuries past.

Quilts made for special occasions or display were seldom used, and are in

excellant condition today. However, the majority of quilts made were well

used and yes, repaired over and over again, many by the original quiltmaker.

Quilts were made to be functional, with scarcely a thought to having it

displayed in a museum. Quilts were washed using harsh methods and beaten and

we would consider them abused today, but we are smarter today about such

methods.

How would we want our quilts to be treated years from now? To have someone

meticously and carefully repair (not change) a quilt, so that it might be

appreciated and seen, not stored, would bring me great joy. Quilts have

always been repaired, it is part our their history that has been passed down

through generations of families. True restoration does not mean removing age

from a quilt, nor does it mean altering or changing a quilt. Perhaps there

is a lack of understanding, on the part of some, about what true restoration

is.

There is admittedly, a huge gap between those who believe conservation is the

only correct solution in preserving our quilts and those who believe

restoration can be successfully used in maintaining a quilts condition. How

can we forget what our ancestors have taught us about preserving and

maintaining quilts.