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Quilters Find a way to care

 

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 08:01:06 -0500 (EST)

From: Tubeywooby@aol.com

To:As a physician I can tell you many people produce gobs of ear wax and have to

come in for its removal twice a year. Never thought about saving it... : (

Anoymous disgusted doctor quilter

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 08:03:36 -0600

From: LAURA SYLER <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net>

To: 

Pat Cantrell wrote:

>

> Hello fellow quilters,

> I'm thinking of dropping in on the Dallas Quilt Show, but it is a bit

> late to request registration info. Could someone tell me which are

> the convention hotels? and if anyone knows, do any of them still

> offer a show rate? Any info will be appreciated.

>

> Many Thanks,

> Pat Cantrell

> patc@cc3.uca.edu

Dallas Quilt Celebration '97

Contact Hotels:

Embassy Suites Market Center 2727 Stemmons 214-630-5332 should have some

rooms left at $95.00 for the show Specify QRS - Quilt Restoration

Society to get that rate

Renaissance Dallas 2222 Stemmons 214-631-2222 MAY still have rooms. I am

not sure of rates for rooms left.

If you need any more info, give me a shout We can e-mail you the info

with attachments about the show in general and the Quilt Heritage

Foundation-Quilt Restoration Society and Quilt Rescue Squad. Right

Cindy??

Laura Hobby Syler, Publicist

Quilter's Guild of Dallas, Inc.

texas_quilt.co@airmail.net

972-783-4149

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 09:11:08 -0600 (CST)

From: Cynthia A Wall <wallcyn@mail.auburn.edu>

To:

>

> I want to warmly thank all of you who took the time to send me information

> about Paducah. We did get accommodations (right in Paducah), and we're all set

> to go. I just have to find a big old stash of money between now and April 26th!

> Thank you again!

> Anne Sturtevant

> princess@mdn.net

>

>

 

I'm going with my income tax refund! File early & get money back early -

yippee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Cindy

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 13:49:46 -0500

From: gridgees@algorithms.com (Merry May)

To:

Sorry to gross everyone out yesterday! But I think this is a legitimate

question, and one that we should try to either document or dispell. I have

to admit, it really does sound pretty gross. (I'd also think "it" would

cause the thread to turn yellow.)

....But after all, we DO use spit to remove blood spots, don't we???

Merry

gridgees@algorithms.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 06:37:53 -0800

From: nomad1@ibm.net

To: 

Dear All,

Thanks so much for all your lovely feedback to my question . I have made

up a little scrap bag for Anika to paly with as she is always running off

with my scraps . As soon as she can handle a needle---3 ish , I will try

& make a doll quilt with her methinks . What a joy it will be to learn @

3 instead of 35 like me !!

Jane , your post was such a good laugh ...Thank You . Yes , would hate to

be thought as " Dirty Quilters of Yesteryear " someday ! Something I

learned recently in my research of Flour Bags in Australia , was that

some folk actually rubbed driping on the bags & then boiled them to get

the printing off . Jane , was it the same in U.S ? I thought your

Feedsack Club would have research on this . By the way , when does your

next Newsletter come out ? Am really looking forward to it .

Hiranya Loder

nomad1@ibm.net

Sydney , Australia

p.s. Down Under Quilts is going On Line, for those interested in seeing

a Aussie magazine

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 13:32:49 -0600

From: LAURA SYLER <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net>

To: 

I agree...The ear wax needs to be confirmed or dispelled, but the very

idea...As to my latest encounter...

I had a client bring me a quilt last week for a consultation. She knows

that it has some historical significance, may have some value, but

doesn't really want to keep it...Therefore leading to my quary and

search for advise.

This is one of the ORIGINAL quilt as you go quilts. Each block,a Cross

Album block as seen on page 58 of Enduring Grace, is individually bound

then the 40 ten inch squares (5x8) are whip stitched together. There is

a stamp on the back "Sanitary Commission" in an oval.

We are calling the quilt "The Soldier's Quilt" due to inscriptions such

as "God Bless you, soldier scarred & worn, Wearied with marchings,

walking,pairs, All battle stained & battle torn,Bravely have all your

tasks been borne;you have not fought in vain." Signed Emma C Baker

(here's the tricky part) Norradgewark (or work) Maine. Almost all the

signatures are legible. Most have the town, none have a date. My client

has tried to look up the town and cannot find it. Does anyone know of a

town of this name in Maine? She is leaning to "loaning" it to a museum

or historical society in Maine if she can find one she feels is worthy

of her family heritage.

Alas, she feels that her sons are not of the nature to appreciate the

quilt. She knows that 1 daughter-in-law considers it a filthy

rag(gasp!!) I have asked her to bring it to the Dallas Show for the

Quilt Heritage Foundation and Quilt Rescue Squad to evaluate and advise

her on. Since she doesn't want to keep it, I felt out of my comfort zone

to advise her as to what to do. I assure ya'll can give some advise. Oh

yeah, The quilt was exhibited at the Kansas State Fair, possibly in the

20's won a blue ribbon(it's attached)and somewhere she has a newspaper

clipping with more info.on the quilt. I look forward to any comments and

advise.

Laura Hobby Syler

texas_quilt.co@airmail.net

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 15:34:08 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrett@fast.net>

To: 

You wrote -

> This is one of the ORIGINAL quilt as you go quilts. Each block,a Cross

> Album block as seen on page 58 of Enduring Grace, is individually bound

> then the 40 ten inch squares (5x8) are whip stitched together. There is

> a stamp on the back "Sanitary Commission" in an oval.

> We are calling the quilt "The Soldier's Quilt" due to inscriptions such

> as "God Bless you, soldier scarred & worn, Wearied with marchings,

> walking,pairs, All battle stained & battle torn,Bravely have all your

> tasks been borne;you have not fought in vain." Signed Emma C Baker

> (here's the tricky part) Norradgewark (or work) Maine. Almost all the

> signatures are legible. Most have the town, none have a date.

My comments --

In the 1985 volume of Uncoverings from the American Quilt Study Group is an

article by Virginia Gunn about Civil War quilts from the north. It talks at

length about the quilts made for the Sanitary Commission in many towns in the

north, which would include Maine, and given to hospitals and soldiers during

the Civil War. This sounds like it could definitely be one of those quilts as

the article mentions they often were rather elaborate, had sayings and

signatures. A northern Historical Society/Museum sounds like a good home for

what could be a 140 year old quilt.

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrett@fast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 16:12:49 -0500 (EST)

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 16:12:43 -0500 (EST)

From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com

Message-ID: <970311161240_885729900@emout07.mail.aol.com>

When is national quilt day? Does anyone know of any scheduled activites

in the Phila, PA region?

Also, does anyone know of any quilt exhibitions in the Phila, PA region

running this spring?

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 16:12:49 -0500 (EST)

From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com

To: 

All this sweet talk about getting young children to learn to quilt is

spurring my mind on to creative ideas to aid in their learning. I have

an 18 month old daughter I would love to teach to sew and quilt ASAP!

While 18 months may seem young for her to actually practice skills,

Tweety Babe is learning from watching what Mama does and enjoys doing.

Example is so critical at this age of observation!

Someone recommended starting her on shoelace sewing on colorful cards

with holes punched in them. This is a good idea; no needle to prick tiny

fingers.

Children this age also love playing with blocks and puzzles. I plan

to attach some fabric scraps with fusible web stuff to heavy cardboard or

light-weight wood to make blocks or puzzle pieces for Tweety Babe to

"piece" together her own "quilt".

Another idea I had, which I hope to do for myself, is to fuse the

first side of the web to fabric scraps, cut pieces for blocks from the

fused fabric, then fuse or glue to card stock to make note cards or post

cards to send to family. This project may work for a child old enough to

handle scissors (under supervision) but too young yet to handle a "tiny

slip of metal between 'fat' little fingers".

Tweety Babe is very interested in fabric right now. She likes to

drape herself with a towel or piece of fabric or lay out the fabric over

a doll etc. She is also interested in my sewing basket. (I now remember

a toy my sister and I had when we were young! It was a Fisher-Price

sewing kit! Aimed at 3-5 year olds, it had a large spool, super-sized

button, huge plasic needle, a large thimble, etc. Wonder if they are

still around? But I digress...) She also likes buttons and spools.

Maybe I can have her make a button necklace or a spool doll!?!

This is so exciting! I hope these thoughts of mine will spawn other

creative ideas in QHL readers. Please pass those ideas my way!

Thanks for reading.

Kimberly in spring-lilke Bristol, PA (near Phila)

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 16:54:30 -0500 (EST)

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: 

I can't recall WHICH digest someone mentioned GRACE McKANCE SNYDER, and I

added my experiecne with the subject as well..Ialso mentioned the LADY'S

CIRCLE PATCHWORK QUILT having pictures and a wonderful article about Grace

and her quilts..I emailed TERRY NYMAN, my editor at LCPWQ, and she is asking

he warehouse to find the copy of it and will send it to me..til then, if

anyone has the JAN/FEB OF 1991..issue #73..that is the one..and I thank Terry

sincerely for going the extra mile..jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 97 20:37:55 PST

From: John & Cinda Cawley <cawley@epix.net>

To: 

I got a beautiful poster in the mail announcing an exhibit of Quilts of

Adams Counbty PA, 1830-1940 at the Gettysburg College Gallery from March

17 to April 6. The exhibit is a result of the Quilt Documentation project

that produced the book The Hands That Made Them in 1993. This book is one

of my favorites--so gorgeous. I don't know how many quilts are exhibited.

Gallery # is 717-337-6121, but nobody answered when I called. Maybe it's

Spring Break. If I find out more I'll post it.

Cinda in Scranton

-------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 17:23:50 -0500 (EST)

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: 

Message-ID: <970311172238_1216970291@emout04.mail.aol.com>

Merry, I think it is an interesting thread as well..and many strange

practices/items were used those many years ago..I will curious to see what

this brings forth..if I miss anything, keep me posted..hope there is more

input..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 18:48:19 -0500 (EST)

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: 

for Hiranya,

I am guessing that 'driping' might be grease from cooking bacon/meat that

leaves dripings? We too tried desperately to get the printing out of the

sack..they would boil them in hot water with home-made soap and of course

that contained lye..VERY HARSH..but then ALL their quilts were washed this

way..theyu would soak them in kerosine, lay them out in the yard and let the

sun beat down on them..trying to get the lettering out..and when it didn''t

come out, or not all of it came out , they would turn the lettering in towrds

the batting if using it for a lining for a quilt..

The dyes were extremel;y strrong in those days ..hence why the colors of the

feedsacks are so glorious..the EPA here in the states doesn't allow them

today..

The newsletter is in most members hands now..I have no idea how long it

will take for yours to get there..sorry..you'll just have to move closer!!

Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 18:34:31 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrett@fast.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject:

You wrote -

> When is national quilt day? Does anyone know of any scheduled activites

> in the Phila, PA region?

> Also, does anyone know of any quilt exhibitions in the Phila, PA region

> running this spring?

Answer -

On Friday, March 14, and Saturday, March 15 -- National Quilt Day -- the

Homemaker's Country Quilters of Creamery, PA, will be having a quilt show. It

is at the Montgomery County 4-H Center, Creamery, on route 113, one mile south

of Skippack Pike, which is route 73.

The flyer says -- donation $4, Merchant Mall, Boutique, Demonstrations, Lunch,

Educational Displays, Raffle Quilt, Door Prizes. Please, no strollers. I went

to the show several years ago and it was very nice -- no old quilts because as

one member told me -- all the quilts on display are made by the members and

must have been completed within the last 2 years, which is how long it is

between shows.

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrett@fast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 01:20:02 -0500 (EST)

From: BrickWks1@aol.com

To: 

<< >Dallas Quilt Celebration '97 March 21,22,23> Dallas World Trade Center

> 2050 Stemmons Freeway, NOTE:location change from last year, 2 blocks south.

> We will be back at Market Hall in '98 & '99. >>

>

> DON'T MISS the Quilt Rescue Squad Days!! They'll be held Sat. March 22 (all

> day), and Sun., March 23 (afternoon only) This is your chance to bring in

> your quilt and have experts informally appraise it, suggest repair and

> restoration techniques, including what materials are needed, etc., and

record

> it for the national files of the Quilt Heritage Foundation, for only a

small

> fee. Formal appraisals are also available.

Well, all, I GOOFED. The Quilt Rescue Squad Days are really only 1 day!

That's the afternoon of Sat., March 22. Sunday, March 23, is currently slated

as an "overflow" day, in case we get too swamped on Sat.

But please don't fear. Nancy Kirk, myself, and other QRS members,

including Laura Hobby Syler, will be running around the Dallas conference on

Thursday, Friday and Sunday, in case you absolutely positively can't make it

into town on Saturday. You'll be able to generally find Nancy and myself near

the Kirk Collection booth--or leave a message with us there and we'll get

back to you.

My apologies for the earlier misstatement. Cindy Brick

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 97 20:22:47 PST

From: John & Cinda Cawley <cawley@epix.net>

To: QHL@cue.com, quiltart@quilt.net

Subject: QHL: Ricki Maietta

Message-ID: <Chameleon.970311202616.cawley@.epix.net>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Sorry everybody but I've lost Ricki's address. Please Ricki e-mail me.

Cinda in Scranton

cawley@epix,net

-------------------------------------

Name: John & Cinda Cawley

E-mail: cawley@epix.net

Date: 3/11/97

Time: 8:22:47 PM

This message was sent by Chameleon

-------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 05:13:22 -0500 (EST)

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: National Quilt Day

Message-ID: <970312051322_414521589@emout15.mail.aol.com>

National Quilt Day is this forth coming Sat..and sorry, can't help you with

any Phil show but if you are from that area..come and see us APRIL 4TH AND

5TH at HO JO's, Rt 30 (Lincoln Highway)..for THE FEEDSACK QUILT

SHOW/CONVENTION..ALL FREE..no admission, free quilt show, show and tell,

demos, displays of quilts and feedsack memorabilia..we are just one mile down

the road from QUILTERS HERITAGE CELEBRATION..we'd love to meet you..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 06:40:35 -0500 (EST)

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: 

HIRANYA asked about washing out dyes..I posted to her but there was an error

and I guess it will be delivered later..so will go ahead and post here as

several others have now asked..HIRANYA mentions using 'dripings' to take out

print on sacks in her native Australia..I am guessing 'dripings' is the

grease from cooking various meats,such as our bacon/sausage..Yes, they did

use lard as well as kerosine, and they would also boil the daylights out of

sacks using homemade soap..and of course we all know the main ingredient in

homemade soap..LYE!! After this boiling water bath they would lay the sacks

out in the grass and let the sun bleach them..they would rub them on their

washboards..imagine the friction on the threads!! If any print remained,

they would turn it to the inside of the quilt lining or turn it inside out

for pillowcases..often we will find a quilt with printing on the lining..and

we have to hold it to a mirror to read it..little did they know that TODAY we

would prefer to have the printing left on it..

In discussing this thread on private email, I was asked to post a bit about

washing quilts YESTERYEAR..They would build a fire in a large pot (usually

cast iron) and chip up homemade soap..now please keep in mind during this

post your most favored quilt,,especially if it appeard on the cover of a

noted quilt mag..this quilt was lucky to see water twice a year..if it was on

a child bed and there were accidents b thru the night..that quilt didn't get

washed..it was tossed over a porch railing, on a clothesline, layed out in

the grass..to dry and be used again night after night..til spring or fall

cleaning..so here we are with this quilt.into the boiling bath it goes..your

water is boiling so you sure can't ge in there wiht you hands..so you use

your agitator to stir it ..A STICK..after it has been washed thoroughly..here

again, you can't get your hands in there..so you jsut go about your chores

and let it cool down til you can..yep..it lays in there with all that gunk

floating around..are you picturing that award winning quilt??

After the water cool down you bring it out and take it to your wringer..OH

YES!! they ad wringers in those days..no washers but they had

wringers..that's you on one end and me on the other..and we

WRING/TWIST/SQUEEZE..til all water is out..then we either have another pot of

water or we take it to the creek to rinse..and then begin to wring

again..picture that bue ribbon winner!

Now to the dryer..THE SUN..spread it out in the grass..keepit out from

under the trees..you don't want the birds to leave their calling cards on

it..toss it over the fence, a clothes line, the porch rail..but let that sun

cook it..and when it is half way done..turn it over to bake the other

side..isn't it amazing that we have anything today that we can call an

antique quilt?? I love to see the looks on the faces of my audience when I

relate this story..especially when they have a GORGEOUS RAFFLE QUILT HANGING

THERE!! Jane

 

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 09:43:11 -0500

From: gridgees@algorithms.com (Merry May)

To: 

National Quilting Day is this Saturday, March 15. The only activity that I

know of in the "Philadelphia area" is our event at the local library in

Cape May County, NJ. I'm sure there are others, I just don't know what or

where they are! We'll be having hourly demos from 11 AM to 4 PM, with

demos by the librarian on the half-hour about cruising the Internet. We

also have a group of ladies who will be quilting on a floor frame, as well

as individual members bringing "UFOs" to work on. Today the library's

"Math Club" (for students) will being doing an activity related to quilts,

plus tomorrow's story time for the younger children will be geared around

some of the wonderful quilt stories for children. We'll wind up on Monday

evening with a free showing of the film, "Quilts in Women's Lives." We've

had a good response so far - in fact, the newspaper ran a run-down of the

activities LAST Friday by mistake, and the librarians said the phone was

ringing off the hook. But hopefully people can plan it into their

schedules for this Saturday! Oh, the same newspaper that messed up will be

sending a photographer on Saturday, and again on Monday (the 17th) when

they send a reporter to interview our guild members.

This is the first time in several years that we've actually gotten our act

together far enough in advance to be able to get some promotion out of it.

We usually remember it at our guild meeting, which tends to happen about 4

days before NQD!

Merry in southern New Jersey

gridgees@algorithms.com

Schoolhouse Enterprises is now TOLL-FREE!: (888) 84GEESE

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 09:45:42 -0600 (CST)

From: celmore@ksu.edu

To: qhl@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Children and quilting

Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.91.970312094236.9401C-100000@fox.ksu.ksu.edu>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

A friend of mine, Barb Eikmeier, has just had a book published by That

Patchwork Place called Kids Can Quilt. Barb has done lots of quilting

with children. I think it will be an excellent resource to use if you

are working with children.

Carol Elmore

Manhattan, Kansas

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 13:34:07 EST

From: debatqps@juno.com

To: Q

National Quilting Day is March 15. We are having a big sale at our shop.

There is a show March 22 & 23 in Bethlehem PA. How close is that to

Philly?

Debbie in NJ

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 16:59:45 -0500 (EST)

From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Bethlehem, PA

Message-ID: <970312165907_1613673128@emout05.mail.aol.com>

Debbie in NJ (debatqps@juno.com) --

Bethlehem, PA is approx 1.5 -2 hrs from Phila area. Tell more on show in

Bethlehem! Have relatives there! Also, where is your shop? NJ is

nearby too!

Love this List!

--Kimberly in Bristol, NE of Phila, PA

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 17:03:54 -0500 (EST)

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: 

SCHOOLHOUSE IS TOLL FREE???? Way to go, Merryy..Congrats..boy, will this

make a difference..wait til you get to convention, they see your gridgeese,

and trunk show and all those neat items you have and can call TOLL FREE!!

How many times does a person take literature, walk away fully intending to

"order that when I get home" and the flyer becomes something to jot a note

on..the membership in THE FEEDSACK CLUB is $12.00 and a few weeks ago a lady

joined and sent me a check for $6.00..that was EONS ago..but that was what

was on her flyer and we honoredit..wel, I didnt' mean to meander..and I also

had sent a previous mesg about the earspoon..and it bounced back to

me..anyway,, I hope this thread will be pursued as it is of interest to many

of us..I'd like to see if it can be docuemented..also..wonder if any of those

spoons are around in shops and they don't know wht at theyahve..what time

would that hve been, Merry? Jane

--

Date: Fri, 14 Mar 97 21:19:48 PST
From: John & Cinda Cawley <cawley@epix.net>

Hi Barb,
    I too kept getting that annoying (esp. when calling long distance)
musical enswering machine. I finally called the admissions office. I
found the # in one of the college guides the kids used years ago. As I
had begun to suspect it was Spring Break. The admissions lady directed me
to public relations whence comes the following: the exhibit consists of
30 quilts all mad in Adams Co. The dates are March 17 to April 6.
Gettysburg College Gallery, Schumcker Hall. Mon-Fri. 10-3; Sat.-Sun. 1-4.
Free. My friend Lorraine and I are planning to go on the 25th.
-------------------------------------
Name: John & Cinda Cawley
E-mail: cawley@epix.net
Date: 3/14/97
Time: 9:19:49 PM

This message was sent by Chameleon
-------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Mar 1997 22:34:29 -0500 (EST)
From: Karen108@delphi.com
To: qhl@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Hands All Around VI
Message-id: <01IGIBXY0VQ69ZNU3W@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Just a reminder for everyone in Massachusetts that the Hands Across the
Valley Quilt Guild will be hosting Hands All Around VI at Lefrak Gymnasium
at Amherst College tomorrow and Sunday. I think admission is all of $4 for
adults. I'll be there both days - I entered a quilt, and though I have no
illusions about winning, I'm looking forward to seeing people's reaction to
my work.

If anyone from the list is there, I have long brown hair, glasses, and will
likely be in a peasant blouse and pale blue linen bodice, most likely with
black pants instead of a skirt (we had an ice storm and I don't want to walk
around with a wet ankle-length skirt slapping at my ankles). Come say hello
and let me know what you think!

Karen Evans

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Mar 1997 22:48:59 -0500
From: Mary Beth Goodman <mgoodman@albany.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Happy National Quilt Day!
Message-Id: <v03020907af4fcb430f75@[206.72.221.30]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hope you'll all be doing something quilty!

This year we'll be flying the colors at Colonie Center - a large shopping
mall near Albany NY. Probably the only multi-guild event of the year too.
:-)

Last year we really showed just about every facet of quilting from old to
newest. And talked a LOT to the interested public!

It's really a great opportunity to show people what's up in quilting and
that we're not just all Colonial Recreators.... Heck some of us will be
little old ladies in Tennis shoes someday!

I remember one particular incident last year - I had brought a classic
tangerine/green 8 pointed star top and some yoyo pieces that my neighbor
had done. Mostly 30's fabrics.... They made a nice table top display along
with some books and information materials.

One man stopped by and just couldn't keep his eyes and hands off those yo
yos. Finally he said.... you've brought back such memories - I don't know
what these are called, but I can see my mother sitting in the evening
making them, so clearly.

It seemed like we had really dredged up a long forgotten image for him.
What a nice thing.

And I remember our own KRIS! stopping by to say hi! Maybe we'll see you
again this year?


Mary Beth Goodman, Coordinator
NYQuilts!
Quilts, Fairfield Fashion Show, vendors, lectures, classes!
June 7 & 8, 1997
Russell Sage College, Troy NY
http://www.albany.net/~mgoodman/NYQuilts.htm

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 00:14:22 -0500 (EST)
From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: National Quilting Day & treasures
Message-Id: <2.2.16.19970315001227.57b719fa@mail.albany.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Happy almost-National Quilting Day everyone! Yes, I plan to stop by the
Colonie Center Display. I was fascinated by the displays and demonstrations
last year. You know, you always learn *something* - last year I watched a
couple of demonstrations on techniques I would not normally have tried.
Interesting stuff.

Got two treasures in the mail today. One was a package from our own Hiranya
Loder, who sent me a book on Australian quilting, a magazine, and a fluffy
sheep magnet with googly eyes. Looks remarkably like me when I get up in
the morning. I wonder how she knew that? <G> What surprised me was the
book on Australian quilts. Some of them were striking modern, definitely
"art" quilts with 3D designs.

The other treasure came from an older woman who has been cleaning her house.
She sent me a quilt her grandmother made her 55 years ago, along with a
picture of her and her grandmother taken about 50 years ago. It is a
completely unused crib quilt of two children dancing around a Maypole with a
patchwork border. This is the third quilt I own now with a picture of the
maker. I do plan - someday when I get organized - to have the pictures
copied onto muslin and sew them to the back of their respective quilts.

I loaded Windows 95 today, a big, scary step for me. It went without a
hitch, with one exception: I lost all my color! The applications have
color, just not the pictures. No problem, I don't need to see the color of
any quilt do I:-} Spent half the day on the phone to tech support & I
suspect I will be spending more tomorrow, if someone is there.

By the way, Jean Ann, I just sent Hiranya a pair of feedsack shorts and two
matching feedsacks to for her little Anika - your mother didn't donate all
your old clothes, did she? Quite the co-incidence.

Kris "I'm sick and tired of winter!" Driessen in the snowy, icy, cold


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 00:28:02 -0500
From: "The Welte's" <welte@may-uky.campus.mci.net>
To: 

Well friends,
I will try to make this short. Our clean-up is progressing much slower
that we had hoped. the small towns like Falmouth, and Sherbourne, Ky are
now facing the prospect of finding housing because, in many cases, the
homes they left are no longer liveable.

I have emailed many people privately and ask that, if you want to send your
donations out now, that they be sent to InterQuilt's project, Operation
Burke as they have the capacity to store donations the two to three months
that it will take these flood victims to reestablish residence.

I am still collecting names for local relief in May-June. Thank you for
your concern and generosity. Pray for these folks. They need that most of
all.

The snail mail for Operation Burke is as follows:

Operation Burke
Kapur Business Systems, Inc.
475 Mill Road
Coram, NY 11727-4137

E-mail to Melissa Bishop: mbishop@CCMAIL.SUNYSB.EDU

Sincerely,
Diana Mains Welte
Maysville, KY

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 07:00:42 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Happy National Quilting Day
Message-ID: <970315070041_-1137052199@emout20.mail.aol.com>

Hi Friends,

Happy National Quilting Day! Just wanted to share this day with you, since
thanks to all of you I've learned so much about quilting, and antique quilts
in the last several months. So have a great day, and happy quilting!

Nancy in Virginia (where it's cool but sunny, and there are DAFFODILS
everywhere!)

P.S. I must admit that I watch the weather more closely now since I "know"
so many of you. Yesterday they talked about Albany, NY getting snow!!!!
Kris, I know you're tired of snow! Hope it warms up wherever all of you
might be today!

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 97 08:57:25 -0500
From: princess@mdn.net
To: 
Does anyone know how Paducah is holding up against flooding -- and if the AQS
Museum is still on "dry" land?

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 12:53:29 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: 

Well, Jean Ann, not only are we talking about washing those feedsacks but my
700+ members buy them. sell them, and trade them..waht glorious colors and
what fascinating stories we hear about memories such as you shared with
childhood days..for those who lived in the deep in the country it was
commonplace to wear feedsacks..infact, their entire house was filled with
feedsack items other than clothing..for those who lived close to a town, it
could be a stigma..because the 'city' kids had store bought clothes..SEARS
ROEBUCK..but store-bought..BUT the kids with store bought had just a dress
and would see others just like it..but YOU, Jean Ann, probably had the dress,
matching panties, possibly a scarf to cover your head, and a DOLLY DRESSED TO
MATCH..many thanx for sharingf your memories..and adding to a post that
always draws interest..if you are coming to QUILTERS HERITAGE CELEBRATION the
first weekend of April..come see us..THE FEEDSACK CLub..just one mile down
the road from the big event..we'll be at HO JO's The official home of our
club..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 97 14:55:35 PST
From: "Anne Doerge" <ahdoerge@telenet.net>
To: "Sue McClure" <suzy@albany.net>, "QHL" <QHL-Digest@cue.com>
Subject: Re: QHL: Books
Message-ID: <MAPI.Id.0016.0068646f657267653030303830303038@MAPI.to.RFC822>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"; X-MAPIextension=".TXT"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Sue,
    I'm new to this list. Didn't know about it till I ran into Kris last
weekend.

    To answer your question about Shared Threads- I have it and find it very
interesting, has lots of beautiful quilts made by groups of women for many
different reasons. It's written by Jacqueline Marx Atkins, who wrote
Memories of Childhood, a book on quilt contest winners for the second Great
American Quilt Festival; also, with Phyllis Tepper, New York Beauties:
Quilts from the Empire State (a book I love).
    She will be our guest speaker April 8, 1997 - Schoharie Valley Piecemakers
Guild, which meets the 2nd Tues. of each month Sept.- June at 7:00 pm in
the Reformed Church, Main St., Schoharie, NY.
    A few of us in the guild are at present quilting 2 tops given to her last
year by 2 guilds she lectured to in Japan. One is finished and ready for
her to pick up when she comes.

Kris, I hope you can make this one! I'm enjoying this very much. Thanks.

Anne in Middleburgh
ahdoerge@telenet.net

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 12:57:43 -0800 (PST)
From: Diane Lockwood <dcl@innercite.com>
To: 

Hi,

Bet you all thot I'd dropped off the ends of the earth! Well, I'm back and
will give you the description of the next old quilt we found in my MIL's
attic.

A note on the red/white Drunkard's Path I described a few weeks ago. I
found a note that it is a 1930s not 1940s quilt. Also, my dh found a
mention of it in his mom's inventory. She bought it in 1960 for $30.

Here's the next quilt. Everyone get out your 1942 copy of Quilts magazine
and look on page 3. Yes, nineteen forty two!!! I have a copy of this mag.
Anyway, the quilt on page 3 has same fabric as this next quilt which my MIL
also bought in 1960 for $30. She found two bargains that year!

Finding a quilt with the same fabric in a 1942 mag sorta dates this quilt
to that era???

The blue is a dark navy with 1/8" circles evenly scattered over it. The
circles may have been white at one time. They are light blue now.

There are 6 blocks across and 7 down. The blocks measure 10 3/8" to 10
5/8". They are not all the same. The pieced blocks alternate with the solid
bleached muslin blocks.

Hmmm, how to describe the pieced blocks.... there is a square of the blue
fabric approx 5 1/2" in the center. In each of the corners is a blue
pineapple of two rows/logs and a 1 1/4" blue square in the corners. The
sides and top of the center blue square have muslin triangles to fill in
between the pineapple corners.

Have I confused you completely? I don't have the book with the 4,000
patterns in it.

The border is 7" wide and of bleached muslin. It has appliqued swags (?) of
the blue fabric, 5 across the top and bottom of the quilt and 6 on the
sides. Where the swags go up to join there is a heart and two "ribbons"
coming down. Where the swags meet at the heart, they meet at the upper
outermost part of the heart.

The corners are rounded and there is the heart part in each corner.

This quilt has a *very* thin batt in it. I can see thru the batt to the
blocks on the top.

It is hand quilted. There are an average of 9 stitches per inch showing on
the top. Is that 18 stitches to the inch or just 9?!!! There was a flap on
another list regarding how one counts stitches so I'll leave it up to you
to decide.

Diane




Diane Lockwood in Pollock Pines, Calif
dcl@innercite.com

"What I do today is important because I am exchanging a day of my life for it."

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 17:09:00 -0500 (EST)
From: "Kris Driessen, Hickory Hill Antique Quilts" <oldquilt@albany.net>
To: Q

Terry Clothier Thompson, an award winning quilter and co - author of Kansas
Quilts, suffered a devastating loss when her apartment was involved in a
neighborhood fire. By some miracle, her home was spared from the fire itself
but suffered water and smoke damage. All her furniture, clothes, personal
belongings and quilts were damaged or destroyed. Unfortunately, Terry does
not have insurance to cover this loss and is now technically homeless. She
is is staying part-time with Barbara Brackman and part-time with her sister
while she looks for a new place to live.

Terry relies on her income from quilt teaching and quilt making for a living
and the fire has brought everything to a halt for now. Since Terry's most
urgent need at this time is for money, the Quilt Heritage Foundation has set
up a "Terry Thompson Fire Fund" at Norwest Bank, 1919 Douglas St., Omaha, NE
68102. If you would like to make a donation, send it directly to the bank.
Please send it with a note including your e-mail address. Because we want
every penny raised to go to Terry, we'd like to send thank you notes by
e-mail to save the postage and stationary costs.

We would also like to hold a "fire sale" to raise funds. This will help
those of us who may be a bit cash restricted at the moment still
participate. We are requesting donated items to be sold by the owner with
the proceeds being forwarded to the fund. To save time and money, we would
appreciate it if the owner of each item would conduct the sale. For example,
if you would like to donate a handful of fat quarters, you would E-mail
oldquilt@albany.net with your offer (and a picture, if appropriate) and we
would put that in the sale section. Or the auction section, if you have a
high value item you would prefer to auction. (Please specify an ending date
if conducting an auction.) When the winner pays you, you forward the money
to the fund. You get to clean house, the buyer gets a treasure, and the
Terry gets help in her time of need. Everyone benefits, and we may even have
a little fun in the process!

For more information, please E-mail oldquilt@albany.net or KirkColl@aol.com.
We have set up web and sale pages at http://www.albany.net/~oldquilt/ttff.htm
Our most sincere thanks for any help you can offer.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 08:53:12 +0800
From: Kath Balfour <balfourk@echidna.id.au>
To: 

It was a 'big day out' for us. A rural Western Australian quilting guild
invited Yesteryear Quilts to share our collection of antique American
quilts on Saturday afternoon at a small community hall in the beautiful
Perth foothills. Despite the heat, humidity and distance, 167 visitors --
mainly from the city, came to the exhibition.

Most of the visitors were quilters who had not had the chance before to see
(and touch!) old quilts close up. We were absolutely delighted with the
turn out. It was satisfying to see so many people moving around the
exhitions, asking questions, admiring the quilts, pausing transfixed in
deep scrutiny, or else chatting animatedly in endless speculation about the
quilts, the women who made them, and the ideas they could borrow.

The guild borrowed ten free-standing double sided display frames from the
WA Quilters Assoc, so we were able to hang 20 quilts. My partner Lyn & I
spent many happy hours last week selecting which of our 'adoptees' to
display, sewing sleeves on the backs of them, and getting our collection in
shape by cleaning, mending and restoring the quilts that needed attention.
We were so excited! It was our first real opportunity since we stared our
antique quilt business last year to see a large part of our collection
fully displayed, and it looked just great.

Among the quilts we chose were a richly embroidered silk & velvet crazy
quilt with civil war memorabilia (thanks, Kris Driessen!), a turn-of-the
century Crown of Thorns pattern in double pinks (via Shelley Fracalossi), a
50s applique of with entwined blooms & buds, swags & bows (again, from
Kris), a lovely worn and faded old Tree of Life (from Sally Hale) and
several 30s feedsack patchwork cuties from deep in the heart of Texas.

Many visitors recalled their mothers utilising, out of thrift or necessity,
unbleached calico flour bags. But the revelation that once upon a time in
America all sorts of grain products could be purchased in bags manufactured
from printed material drew comments. So did the fact that during the
depression & war, feedsacking was the only fabric many women could obtain.

I found myself wishing I had a video of Bag Lady Jane telling her story
about washing the quilts in boiling cauldrons complete with lye soap, the
human wringer, etc. (why not make videos with all your wonderful stories,
Jane???). Don't worry, I told it anyway...

I suppose we take it as a commonplace that quilts have always been made by
experts and amateurs alike, and that the old time quilter tended to do the
best she could with what she had -- whether in terms of skill, time,
motivation, materials, knowledge.

So we were indeed fascinated to hear our guests marvel at the wide range
skills (or lack of them) apparent in the quilting, the more incongruous
colour combos, fabric mixes, design inconsistancies, etc. One woman told me
she was greatly encouraged to see these 'human elements' --it meant that
she could ease up on her expectations of herself and get on with the
enjoyment of quilting! I liked that comment very much.

Thanks again, Kris, for creating this list to enhance & promote quilting
heritage. Such a wealth of ideas and knowledge. And to all you who so
generously contribute, thank you for sharing, I'm paying close attention!





--
Kath Balfour
Yesteryear Quilts
37 Gibson St
Hilton WA 6163
AUSTRALIA

e-mail: balfourk@echidna.id.au
fax: +619-336-4230
voice: +619-335-6401

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 19:25:13 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: 


Well I'm going to get myself into trouble here. I admit I didn't listen too
closely to the discussions last week about feedsacks. So if my questions
seem repetitive, then I apologize!

I saw some feedsacks in an antique store today. All were muslin (no pretty
prints) with blue and red printing on them. How DID you go about getting the
blue print out of the feedsacks in order to use them in clothing or quilting?

And Jane, I needed that book today! I didn't have a clue whether these were
valuable or not, and whether the price being asked was reasonable or not!
Now I see why you have the book! Lesson learned.

TIA for your feedback,

Nancy in VA
AJSNGS@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 20:47:10 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: 



Now you know why the cover fell off..it's my feedsack bible..they
boiled/bleached/rubbed/did everything they could..and it didn't always get it
all out..Oh well!! Jane

------------------------

ate: Sat, 15 Mar 97 19:44:56 -0800
From: beth_novak@om.cv.hp.com
Item Subject: cc:Mail Text

Thanks to all who have offered help on historical home dying process.
Now for a specific question... I have an old Lovers Knot top (turn of
the century) that is green and natural muslin. I'm told the green is
a natural vegetable dye and has faded in several areas. Before I
quilt up this top, I'd like to revitalize these faded green areas,
with a green vegetable dye! Does anyone know what vegetables were
used to get the early greens?
Beth_Novak@om.cv.hp.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 97 22:32:42 PST
From: John & Cinda Cawley <cawley@epix.net>
To: Sue McClure <suzy@albany.net>, QHL@cue.com
Subject: RE: QHL: Books
Message-ID: <Chameleon.970315224053.cawley@.epix.net>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=ISO-8859-1

If Bits and Pieces is one of Jeanette Lasansky's books get it. All of the
Oral Traditions project book (Lewisburg, PA) are invaluable. (IMHO). RE:
Shared Threads. It covers the subject of group quilts up to the present
(chapter on the Aids Quilt). My all-time favorite book on group quilts is
For Purpose and Pleasure: Quilting Together in Nineteenth Century America
by Sandi Fox, Rutledge Hill Press, ISBN 1-55853-337-0.

Cinda in Scranton
-------------------------------------
Name: John & Cinda Cawley
E-mail: cawley@epix.net
Date: 3/15/97
Time: 10:32:42 PM

This message was sent by Chameleon
-------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 02:19:37 -0800
From: Jody Bordner <qltgrose@gte.net>
To: AJSNGS@aol.com
CC: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Library of Congress/WPA Url
Message-ID: <332BC939.1D62@gte.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Nancy & Jo in Minnesota,

I just wanted to let you know that if you or anyone is planning a switch
in computers, you DO NOT need to lose your precious bookmark pages!

If you are using Windows, go to File Manager (Explorer for Win 95) and go
to Netscape (or whatever program you are using for the internet) and look
for a sub directory that says "bookmark.htm" That is your precious list!
All you need to do is copy it to a floppy disk in your "A" drive and you
will have it! You can also do with with mailing address lists. Very easy
and saves much work later!

If anyone needs any further help with trying this, let me know!
Piece,
Jody

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 09:30:56 -0500 (EST)
From: Qltldy10@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Natural Vegetable Green Dyes
Message-ID: <970316093055_-1773428960@emout11.mail.aol.com>

Beth et al- I was just at the Smithsonian the other day, and they had a
display of wool and dyeing- there was a green there, but guess what- I don't
remember what the plant was. No doubt someone here will. On the other hand,
I thought all fabric greens were overdyed blue and yellow. I own an early
1800ish quilt (feels 1840ish to me- does anybody else date by feel and
sense?), perfect for dating to this era except for one green fabric. It has
not faded at all, and is a pretty bright green. It does not look overdyed.
I thought a green wasn't done until later in the 1800's, so it makes this
particular quilt a little confusing.
PS- I went to Museum of Am. History the other day, of course, Harriet Powers
quilt is still out, and so were about eight others. I had never seen the
Solar System quilt before, only in pictures. The DAR had Elizabeth Fosters
quilts from Treasures in The Trunk out. Poke Stalk and Rose of Sharon are in
the book, but there is a third with the same red and green fabrics used.
They also had out the Flying star she did, as well as another with the same
scrappy fabric combinations. There were five in all by her. I only had one
hour to do both museums, and my blessed DH drove our little Geo Metro
aroundWashington DC at 90 miles an hour so I could get to both places! He
also zoomed into the bookstore at the Smithsonian and scanned the shelves for
me and found the new printing of Hearts and Hands, as well as another I had
never seen. He bought them and brought them to me while I was running the
halls of the Smithsonian finding the quilts (ask when you go in and they give
you a sheet of paper telling you which displays they are in).

Beth, who is back in Maine after a wild Legislative visit!

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 02:04:22 -0800
From: nomad1@ibm.net
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: RE:Washing Feedsacks etc Digest V97 #69
Message-ID: <332D1726.48B1@ibm.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Dear All,
Alan , great taste re Calvin & Hobbes ! Thanks for your info re homemade
soap . I checked out if drippings were directly put on feedsacks , the
answer was yes . Then boiled & dried under our blazing sun , certainly
would have got rid of the grease & pong !

Jane , sorry I did not explain drippings , basically it was any animal
fat saved from the pot , pretty much like U.S.A I guess , except we
might have had kangaroo at times !!

Jean Ann , thanks for sharing your lovely memories with us , how
preciouse they must be to you . I agree with Jane , you all certainly
had special clothes & accessories too !

Kris , glad you liked the book etc . THANK YOU for all the time & effort
you put into QHL & working on the new Web Page . What a hoot re the
feedsack shorts for Anika & me ! This is what I call a treasure , for
don’t forget in Oz we never had the pretty prints you guys had . Ours
were the plain calico ( your muslin in U.S.A. ) , with the business
name printed on top .
Re Aussie quilts , we tend to represent our landscape in all we do I
feel . Though there are many who stick to the traditional blocks as you
know them . Don’t know of Aussie blocks as such . Hmm...must check it
out .
Kris , your Maypole Quilt sounds lovely , a real treasure . Can you
please share colours & detail etc with us all , when you have some
spare time !!
Hiranya Loder from Parramatta , Sydney , Australia
nomad1@ibm.net

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 10:23:00 -0500 (EST)
From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: RE: For Purpose and Pleasure
Message-Id: <2.2.16.19970316102058.2387d83c@mail.albany.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Actually, For Purpose and Pleasure is a book that I can get. I am not sure
what the price would be, but I would guess in the $17 or $18 range. If
anyone is interested, E-mail me & I will call Rutledge Hill and order it.

Kris, "I meant to do that!" Driessen who tinted her hair red today in honor
of St. Patrick's day tomorrow.

>If Bits and Pieces is one of Jeanette Lasansky's books get it. All of the
>Oral Traditions project book (Lewisburg, PA) are invaluable. (IMHO). RE:
>Shared Threads. It covers the subject of group quilts up to the present
>(chapter on the Aids Quilt). My all-time favorite book on group quilts is
>For Purpose and Pleasure: Quilting Together in Nineteenth Century America
>by Sandi Fox, Rutledge Hill Press, ISBN 1-55853-337-0. I paid $24.95 plus
>shipping and it's worth every penny and more. I am a big fan of Ed. R.
>Hamilton but he doesn't have everything and sometimes I have to bite the
>bullet and spen some bucks.
>Cinda in Scranton
>Cinda in Scranton
>-------------------------------------
>Name: John & Cinda Cawley
>E-mail: cawley@epix.net
>Date: 3/15/97
>Time: 10:32:42 PM
>
>This message was sent by Chameleon
>-------------------------------------
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 14:41:39 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: RE: For Purpose and Pleasure
Message-ID: <970316144138_1748668689@emout01.mail.aol.com>

How many books are there in the Oral Traditions books?? I had one once,
loaned it out and NEVER RETURNED..JANE

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 14:38:23 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: RE:Washing Feedsacks etc Digest V97 #69
Message-ID: <970316143822_-1638811949@emout08.mail.aol.com>

regarding using lards/grease from ink removal many years ago,it is truly a
miracle we ahve anything today we can call an antique..the boiling baths they
used were enough to runin anything. Doesn't it make you wonder about
that..they would use such harse soap..they didn't have woolite/oruvs/ivory
snow in those days..they didn't worry about supporting the quilt when it was
soaking wet..before wringers they use twisiting and turning and wringing by
hand..they gave them abrasive rubbing on a washboard..they layed out under
the hot sun//baking on one side, flip it over and bake it on the other..using
kerosine, lard, lye..do you think the manufactured fabs of today could stand
up under that treatment? Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 14:40:25 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: RE: For Purpose and Pleasure
Message-ID: <970316144024_381508368@emout03.mail.aol.com>

no, no Kris..it is GREEN for St Patty's..NOT RED!! You were to tint your
hair GREEN..Then red/blue/white for July..orange/black for
Halloween..etc..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 15:19:46 -0500 (EST)
From: QuiltLine@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Re: flooding in Paducah
Message-ID: <970316151943_1681565386@emout09.mail.aol.com>

To those who want to know about Paducah.

Paducah is blessed to have forefathers who after a "big one" some 40 ? years
ago built a great big flood wall along between the river and downtown. I
like others there thought the flood wall was ? well, an odd looking thing.
It worked very well this past week, protected the downtown area, and when I
spoke to AQS last week I was told the museum was dry, downtown was dry, and
they were going ahead on planning a great show. The Executative Inn has one
side however that was not protected by the wall, and did have some water
collect in the lower level, which is the parking lot. No great damage.

Now, the river did crest after I talked to AQS, but I haven't heard any
reports that would cause me to suspect that downtown Paducah had any real
disaster. However, towns all around and nearby were hit hard, and they all
need out prayers.

Debbie Roberts

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 16:22:02 +0000
From: "The Garretts" <bgarrett@fast.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Oral Traditions Books
Message-Id: <199703162122.QAA02083@post1.fast.net>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

I know of 6 quilt books in the collection. Jeanette has also done books on
other topics, but I don't know what they are.

In The Heart of Pennsylvania - Symposium Papers
In The Heart of Pennsylvania - 19th and 20th Century Quiltmaking Traditions
Pieced By Mother - Symposium Papers
Pieced By Mother - Over 100 Years of Quiltmaking Traditions
On The Cutting Edge
Bits and Pieces

I don't know which ones are available, but address is -

Oral Traditions Project of the Union County Historical Society
Courthouse
Lewisburg, PA 17837

Barb in southeastern PA
<bgarrett@fast.net>

------------------------------
------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 20:26:28 -0500 (EST)
From: "Kris Driessen, Hickory Hill Antique Quilts" <oldquilt@albany.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Picked off the newsgroup
Message-Id: <2.2.16.19970316202432.0effa34c@mail.albany.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I thought y'all would be interrested in this.

>
>In rec.crafts.textiles.quilting, sarah curry smith <scurry@zianet.com>
>wrote:
>
>>Linda Ann Stoeckl wrote:
>>>
>>> My pardon to those who have seen this before since I have posted it on a
>>> couple of AOL groups, also. As part of my university studies, I am
>>> creating a web page dealing with quilts and literature as an aspect of
>>> women's voices and history. I want to collect as many stories that
>>> illustrate that idea as I can. If you have any stories that you would
>>> like to share, I would be very grateful if you would send them to me.
>>> If you are feeling unsure about your writing, I will be glad to help you
>>> put your story into a form you can be proud of. For aspiring writers,
>>> this might be a great way to get published even if you won't get any
>>> money for it but it will look nice in your resume. Send stories or for
>>> more information e-mail me at pibban@konnections.com and I will get back
>>> to you as soon as possible.
>>> Thank you, L. Ann Stoeckl

 

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 21:43:30 -0800
From: Sharon Harleman Tandy <harleman@micron.net
Hello all,

My apologies for being a world class procrastinator. Four words I'm
uncomfortable with: duty, obligation, responsibility, and committment.
The state project book list is coming now and the format will be the
same with one exception: to make it easier to find specific ones, they
will be in alphbetical order by states. There is one book at the bottom
of the list that is not a project book, from Washington. I include it
because it is so much like a project book and it has my Aunt Leona in
it!
BTW: I met a quilter in Houston last fall who said she was from the
guild that put out the book Texas Treasures. I don't have her name and
I believe the book is out of print so if anyone knows how I can get a
copy of that book, please let me know (I hope I have the name of the
book right.) Also, am planning to get the new North Dakota book as soon
as I can find the catalog that carried it! Is Connecticut coming out
with one soon? Sharon.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 23:15:44 -0500
From: Mary Beth Goodman <mgoodman@albany.net>
To: qrs@mail.albany.net, QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Maypole Quilt!
Message-Id: <v03020901af527548ca4e@[206.72.221.80]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

> It is a
>> completely unused crib quilt of two children dancing around a Maypole with a
>> patchwork border.


Now THIS I would like to see!

Mary Beth <-- longing to dance around maypole herself!

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Mar 1997 22:35:53 -0800
From: Sharon Harleman Tandy <harleman@micron.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
CC: ektupper@garden.net
Subject: QHL: quilt history book list #3, state books
Message-ID: <332CE649.2012@micron.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

list begins: 21 items

ARIZONA Helen Young Frost and Pam Knight Stevenson. _Grand Endeavors:
Vintage Arizona Quilts and Their Makers._ (no city): Northland
Publishing, 1992. ISBN 0-87358-547-X

ARKANSAS Arkansas Quilter's Guild, Inc. _Arkansas Quilts: Arkansas
Warmth._ Paducah, Kentucky: American Quilter's Society, 1987. ISBN
0-81945-932-4

CALIFORNIA Jean Ray Laury. _Ho For California! Pioneer Women and Their
Quilts._ New York: E.P. Dutton, 1990. ISBN 0-525-24838-2 (cloth) ISBN
0-525-48533-3 (DP)

FLORIDA Charlotte Allen Williams. _Florida Quilts._ Gainesville,
Florida: University Press of Florida, 1992. ISBN 0-8130-1163-9 ISBN
0-8130-1164-7 (pbk.)

ILLINOIS E. Duane elbert & Rachel Kamm Elbert. _History From the
Heart: a Two-Century Heritage of Illinois Quilts and Quiltmaking: Quilt
Paths Across Illinois._ Nashville, Tennesse: Rutledge Hill Press,
1993. ISBN 1-55853-155-6

ILLINOIS Rita Barrow Barber. _Somewhere in Between: Quilts and
Quilters of Illinois._ Paducah, Kentucky: American Quilter's Society,
1986.ISBN 0-89145-920-0

INDIANA Marilyn Goldman and Marguerite Wiebusch. _Quilts of Indiana:
Crossroads of Memories._ Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana
University Press, 1991. ISBN 0-253-32925-6 (acid-free paper) ISBN
0-253-20644-8 (pbk. acid-free paper)

KANSAS Barbara Brackman et. al. _Kansas Quilts & Quilters._ Lawrence,
Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 1993. ISBN 0-7006-0584-3 (alk.
paper : hardcover)
ISBN 0-7006-0585-1 (alk. paper : paper)

KENTUCKY John Finley and Johnathon Holstein. _Kentucky Quilts:
1800-1900._ Louisville, Kentucky: The Kentucky Quilt Project, 1982. ISBN
1-880584-03-4

MARYLAND Gloria Seaman Allen and Nancy Gibson Tuckhorn. _A Maryland
Album: Quiltmaking Traditions~1634-1934._ Nashville, Tennesee: Rutledge
Hill Press, 1995. ISBN 1-55853-341-9 (hardcover)

MICHIGAN Marsha MacDowell and Ruth D. Fitzgerald. _Michigan Quilts:
150 Years of a Textile Tradition._ East Lansing, Michigan: Michigan
State University Museum, 1987.
ISBN hardcover edition: 0-944311-00-8 ISBN softcover edition:
0-944311-01-6

MISSOURI Bettina Havig. _Missouri Heritage Quilts._ Paducah, Kentucky:
American Quilter's Society, 1986. ISBN 0-89145-912-X

NEBRASKA Patricia Cox Crews and Ronald C. Naugle. _Nebraska Quilts &
Quiltmakers._ Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 1991.
ISBN 0-8032-1452-9 (alk. paper)
ISBN 0-8032-6346-5 (pbk.)

NEW JERSEY Rachel Cochran, Rita Erickson, Natalie Hart, and Barbara
Schaffer. _New Jersey Quilts: 1777 to 1950: Contributions to an
American Tradition._ Paducah, Kentucky: American Quilter's Society,
1992. ISBN 0-89145-996-0

NEW YORK Jacqueline M. Atkins and Phyllis A. Tepper. _New York
Beauties: Quilts from the Empire State._ New York, New York: Penguin
Group, 1992. ISBN 0-525-93432-4 (cloth) ISBN 0-525-48598-8 (DP)

NORTH CAROLINA Ellen fickling Eanes et al. _North Carolina Quilts._
Chapel Hill, North Carolina: The University of North Carolina Press,
1988. ISBN 0-8078-1811-9 (alk. paper) ISBN 0-8078-4234-6(pbk.: alk.
paper)

OHIO Ricky Clark, George W. Knepper, and Ellice Ronsheim. _Quilts in
Community: Ohio's Traditions: Nineteenth & Twentieth Century Quilts,
Quiltmakers, and Traditions._ Nashville, Tennessee: Rutledge Hill
Press, 1991. ISBN 1-55853-101-7

OKLAHOMA Jane Amstuta Harnden and Pamela Frazee Woolbright. _Oklahoma
Heritage Quilts: A Sampling of Quilts Made in or Brought to Oklahoma
Before 1940._ Paducah, Kentucky: American Quilter's Society, 1990. ISBN
0-89145-945-6

TENNESSEE Bets Ramsey and Merikay Waldvogel. _The Quilts of Tennessee:
Images of Domestic Life Prior to 1930._ Nashville, Tennessee: Rutledge
Hill Press, 1986. ISBN 0-934395-30-6

VERMONT Richard L. Cleveland and Donna Bister. _Plain and Fancy:
Vermont's People and Their Quilts as a Reflectioin of America._
Gualala, California: The Quilt Digest Press, 1991. ISBN 0-913327-30-1
(ppr.)

WASHINGTON Nancyann Johanson Twelker. _Women and Their Quilts: A
Washington State Centennial Tribute._ Bothell, Washington: That
Patchwork Place, 1988. ISBN 0-943574-52-8 ISBN 0-943574-51-X (pbk.)

endlist: 21 items. please forgive any mistakes. Sharon

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 06:22:19 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: address
Message-ID: <970317062217_-1773337897@emout07.mail.aol.com>

I'm seeking rob's planet patchwork site Jane

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 07:53:22 -0800
From: lrobins@cclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: refinished furniture/quilts ; Paducah
Message-ID: <32d6aee0@cclink.fhcrc.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

Someone recently posted a quote from a quilt lecturer who said
"If we can refinish antique furniture, why can't we refinish antique
quilts". Well, perhaps that lecturer doesn't know much about antique
furniture. A few weeks ago on the Antiques Roadshow (PBS) they showed
a late-1700's highboy (tall chest of drawers) which the owner had had
refinished "by an expert". The appraiser said the value of the piece
was $15,000. He then said that if the piece had not been refinished,
it would be worth $100,000.


Paducah - on NPR Saturday morning, they interviewed a DJ from Paducah
who was broadcasting from the Executive Inn and said the first level
was flooded and he had to climb from the top of the flood wall, across
a plank, to get into the building. I know MAQS is near the Executive
Inn but haven't heard anything about it yet. Does anyone have any
more info??? It sounds like the flood wall couldn't stop all of the
water -- I sure hope they evacuated the quilts. I also wonder about
all of those antique shops near by with all of their old quilts.

Laura in Seattle

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 16:23:52 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Quilt on ebay
Message-ID: <970317161603_-1539031575@emout14.mail.aol.com>

Hi all,

Just for your information. There is a Wedding Ring quilt c. 1910 on the ebay
auction. Minimum bid of $75.00. The item # is qec827 if you want to take a
look.

No affiliation to ebay or the quilt!

Nancy in VA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 18:41:19 -0500 (EST)
From: HKnight453@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Re: found blocks
Message-ID: <970317183310_-1170326194@emout15.mail.aol.com>

Barb-
buy them, and then worry about getting the yellow out. The price is insanely
low, compared to this neck of the woods...
Heather in RI will 11 inches of snow or so....

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 17:09:59 -0800
From: Bev Jordan <qultfix@directcon.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Old Quilt
Message-ID: <332DEB67.4966@directcon.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I had the fun experience of educating a non-quilting friend at work. He and his
wife had this old quilt and didn't know what to do with it. The wife decided to
give it away but the husband didn't want it given away. He wanted me to look at
it first. It had been tossed into their moving van to be used as packing/cushioning
from some friends of theirs.

Well, first impression is that it is an old quilt in not real good shape, lot of
fraying in may areas. But the backing fabric was in good shape no holes or signs
of repair. It was a six block (about 20" square each) crazy patch made with lots
of different solid colored velvets but also one velvet that was a two-color print.

The first thing I noticed was that there was a very bright red velvet and further
investigation showed that it had been added later than the rest of quilt. There was
sewing machine zig-zag stitches to hold the red velvet piece down and then some
embroidery stitching done to almost copy the rest of the embroidery done on the
original part of the quilt. There were also a couple places where the old crazy
patches had separated at the seams and on one particular patch, the fabric underneath
used as the base for the crazy patches to be sewn to was a light blue and white
calico that I would say is probably from 1880-1900.

After I gave my friend my best guess that this quilt was probably made about 1890-1910
or so, he was really surprised. He didn't really think it was that old. Now he wants
to know what to do with it so I'll give him my little sheet that gives novices my
best instructions on how to care for old quilts including cleaning and storing. I
know he doesn't want to get rid of the quilt now. So, although there's no sentimental
value to the quilt, he now realizes that it is an old quilt he'd like to keep.

Bev

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 21:30:54 -0500 (EST)
From: Virpi Ritola <ritola@sci.fi> (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>)
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Unidentified subject!
Message-Id: <2.2.16.19970317212903.3b8799fa@mail.albany.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

My regards from still wintry Finland to all of you !

I=B4m a newcomer to this list but this sounds interesting! English is=
not
my own lanquage and I had big difficulties to understand what you are
talking about when talking about feedsacks but then I realized you must have
had really different sacks than we had habit of in my youth. Our sacks
were all made of harsh jute and I=B4m sure nobody used them as a dress
fabric. Did you really have calicos as a feedsack ?

Virpi

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 21:30:42 -0500 (EST)
From: Taymor5@aol.com (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>)
To: 

I am giving a presentation to a group of junior high students. The topic is:
How Quilts Document the Civil War era. I am particularly interested in
quilts used in soldier burials, the use of quilts regarding the underground
railroad and quilts made by slaves and former slaves. I know this is broad,
but any information in the way of books, magazine articles, or quilt
historians or experts I might speak with directly would be great. Replies
can be posted here or to me at Taymor5@aol.com
Thanks.

 

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 97 21:00:43 PST
From: Cliff & Claire Fenton <ccdmfent@cajun.net
I am giving a presentation to a group of junior high students. The
topic is:
How Quilts Document the Civil War era. I am particularly interested
in
quilts used in soldier burials, the use of quilts regarding the
underground
railroad and quilts made by slaves and former slaves. I know this is
broad,
but any information in the way of books, magazine articles, or quilt
historians or experts I might speak with directly would be great.
Replies
can be posted here or to me at Taymor5@aol.com
Thanks.

<Please post to the list!!
I'd love this inforamtion also
Claire>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 00:16:19 -0400
From: Peter James Robson <robsonpj@ra.isisnet.com>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Civil War Novels with Quilts
Message-Id: <3.0.1.32.19970318001619.0069a15c@mail.isisnet.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

There is a trilogy by Ann Rinaldi that is called "The Quilt Trilogy". The
three books are "A Stitch in Time", "Broken Days" and "The Blue Door'. They
are published by Scholastic and are suitable for a junior high reading
level. The trilogy follows the lives of three sisters who are seperated by
the Civil War and who each taken have fabric from the family crazy quilt.
They work on their part, each in their own corner of the world, with hopes
of one day being reunited and being able to put the quilt together.

I hope this is helpful.
Barbara
Nova Scotia
Canada

------------------------------
------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 20:50:57 -0800
From: iteach@slip.net (Elizabeth Pruyn)
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Cc: taymor5@aol.com
Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Unidentified subject
Message-Id: <v01540b03af536ad6dd3a@[207.171.196.79]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi there,

>I am giving a presentation to a group of junior high students. The topic is:
> How Quilts Document the Civil War era. I am particularly interested in
>quilts used in soldier burials, the use of quilts regarding the underground
>railroad and quilts made by slaves and former slaves. I know this is broad,
>but any information in the way of books, magazine articles, or quilt
>historians or experts I might speak with directly would be great. Replies
>can be posted here or to me at Taymor5@aol.com

When I teach my quilt unit to elemetary students, one of their favorite
books is "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt". (It's at school right now.
I'll try to remember to get more information for you.) It's a fictional
retelling of a slave girl who uses the information she overhears in the big
Houses kitchen to sew a freedom quilt. My student's really enjoy it.

Yours,
Elizabeth

Elizabeth Pruyn iteach@slip.net Oakland, CA

"If I had been around when Rubens was painting, I would have been revered
as a fabulous model. Kate Moss? Well, she would have been the paint
brush..." - Dawn French

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 23:01:23, -0500
From: RMCQ41A@prodigy.com (MISS KATHERINE A PARKER)
To: 
Hello:

I recently joined this listsev and have enjoyed it greatly? I was
wondering if anyone is going on the Alaska crusie with Doreen
Speckmann at the end of June? I am going and would like to get
aquainted with some felow passenger/quilters.

Please email me at RMCQ41A@Prodigy.com.

Thanks,
Kathy Parker
Tinley Park, IL

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 06:16:13 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To:


Awhile back I posted about a letter I received from McCall's Pattern
Company..we had been writing to various companies requesting a donation for
our 'goody basket' to be raffled at our 3rd Annual Quilt Show/Exhibit at
Lancaster, Pa April 4 and 5..I was shocked that a letter came back from
McCalls stateing they could'nt donate as they save their donations for those
who share a love of sewing..numerous readers from the digests emailed me
asking for their address as they were going to write them..I called to get
the name of the BOSS of the lady who signed the letter I received..By golly,
she is the one answered the phone..EMILY COHEN..she was quite surprised that
this had happened, was VERY apologetic, and explained that they get MANY
requests and there is a form letter they send to people asking for prizes
that are not connected with sewing/quilting..we, by mistake, received one of
those..they are indeed donating a gift and we are quite pleased that this has
been resovled..they have a new product/concept on this item directed at
quilters, so we will highlite it and demo it at our event..come by and see it
and US..

I also had a email from Terri Nyman..editor of LADY'S CIRCLE PATCHWORK QUILT
MAGAZINE and she found the article on GRACE McCANCE SNYDER..it is on it's way
and I'll be able to post it shortly..and since I am sharing this info..and
told above about donated products..LADY'S CIRCLE PATCHWORK QUILT is donating
a YEARS FREE SUBSCRIPTION for our goody basket raffle..YEA!! many thanx
TERRI..we're very excited about this raffle because this basket is filled
with everythng a quilter needs to begin..and to boot..there is a 2nd basket
for the person selling the most tickets..and a 3RD BASKET FOR A WINNER AT OUR
EVENT. This is because we are a wide spread group..scattered across the
country as well as other countries..so it takes us awhile to reach
everyone..hence we'll draw the winner at Christmas time..not bad tho..3
baskets!! Thanx again Terri.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 09:32:53 -0500 (EST)
From: Quiltfix@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: interesting quilts
Message-ID: <970318093248_953659946@emout16.mail.aol.com>

Well, I did get that green and red applique rose wreath this past weekend.
It's as gorgeous as I thought it was. It needed a bath, but that was all.
I'm trying to decide if it is a depression era quilt, or if it is earlier.

It's done on a plain white background (cotton). Nice *hand* to it. The
white is mostly crosshatched at 1/2" intervals (lots of quilting in small
stitches). In the center of the wreaths and in the center of the outside
areas are smallish Lemoyne stars quilted in the crosshatch.

The red fabric is cotton and very stable. Looks turkey-ish. The green was
not stable. The dye looks like it may have been done with two dye baths, one
yellow, then a blue. The green is more concentrated at the quilted lines in
the green, as if the blue migrated from higher spots to lower spots. The
shade of green is almost a spring green, only very muted and grayed.

The applique itself is so good, it almost appears machine made. It's that
good.

I changed my guess somewhat. I had thought it was a kit quilt from the 30's,
but I really don't think so anymore. My guess is a late-1800 time frame.

Any opinions are welcomed.

Alan

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 09:52:52 -0500 (EST)
From: MiamiQuilt@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V97 #71
Message-ID: <970318095251_1551029827@emout13.mail.aol.com>

To Laura Syler re: quilt. Got Post. Will look for photos. Eugenia BaRNES IS
APPRAISING AT dALLAS SHOW AND SHE IS FRIEND OF MINE. iF YOU HAVE PHOTOS THERE
SHE COULD BRING ONE TO ME. tHANKS YOU. pAM MiamiQuilt@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 10:24:38 -0500 (EST)
From: MiamiQuilt@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V97 #72
Message-ID: <970318102436_-1170238196@emout03.mail.aol.com>

A news bulletin about Paducah. The wire services reported that the Executive
Inn, where AQS show is held had water on the ground florr. It is outsied the
flood wall, but MAQS(Museum of the American Quilter ) was dry. This is very
good news. River expected to crest last FRiday, so hope all went as expected.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 10:03:42 -0800
From: Sharon Harleman Tandy <harleman@micron.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Bounced back mail
Message-ID: <332ED8FE.1F4@micron.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Cheral in Kamloops, my post this am bounced back. Let me know if
<jsagan@mail.netshop.net> is incorrect. Sharon.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 13:40:34 -0500 (EST)
From: Laurajbr@aol.com
To: 


Hi Alan,

Your quilt sounds wonderful!! Just from your dexcription it really does
sound more like it came from the 1800's than from the '30's. If you get a
photo take of it, sned it to me. Maybe I'll recognize the fabrics. I have
lots to compare them to. :-) The color combination, the pattern, the quilting
and the fading green all point to an 1800's quilt. Usually when you see a
red and green quilt from the 1900's, the colors are very bright and just
newer looking. When you hold it up to the light can you see any of the cotton
seeds in it?

Well, whenever it's from, enjoy it!! Laura

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 16:03:38 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com, mwilliams@pcb.edu
Subject: QHL: Antique Quaker Quilt Exhibit at Brandywine River Museum
Message-ID: <970318160306_1949297186@emout15.mail.aol.com>

Quiltings All!

I hope your National Quilt Day experiences were as pleasant as mine.
Mom, TweetyBabe, and I went to the Brandywine River Museum to see their
Antique Quaker Quilt exhibit, "Of the best Sort but Plain." They had 20
or so quilts made by or for Quakers in the Delaware Valley dating from
1760-1890.

My response is,"What gorgeous artistry! What exquisite workmanship!"
One of the whole cloth quilts on display was quilted with such tiny
stitches, they were only a few threads apart! I do realize that this is
a quilter's goal, to get one's stitches as small as possible. It was so
inspiring to see such skill.

I bought the book "Of the best Sort but Plain" that Patricia J. Keller,
guest curator, wrote to accompany the exhibit. She chose one of the
whole cloth quilts for the cover picture. Since photography was not
allowed in the museum, I am glad she prepared this well researched book
as a souvenir of the exhibit.

Since we did not finish touring the museum, which mainly displays
paintings by N. C. Wyeth and his son Andrew Wyeth, until almost 3:30 pm,
we decided that we could not also make it to the Creamery show. Instead
we headed south on 202 to see what we could see.

Not too far down the road we stumbled on a group of little shops, one of
which was a quilt shop! Sadly, they did not know that it was National
Quilt Day. But they were quite nice and well stocked with all sorts of
books, tools, and material. I was able to purchase my first reproduction
fabric (1890's I think)! Instead of "fat quarters" they were "obese
eighths."

Question: Is $1.00/obese eighth or $8.00/yd a good price for repro
fabric? Since I feel I am spoiled paying $2-$4/yard for calicos, I am
not sure what to think about this other price. I would appreciate
knowing what others pay for fabric.

Finally, After reading this list and seeing these antique quilts, I know
that I want one of these pieces of history or at least want to find what
may remain of our families' histories.

Keep posting! We're learning!

-- Kimberly in ?springy? Bristol, PA

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 18:30:54 -0500 (EST)
From: "Krans, Sarah A" <skran881@uwsp.edu> (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>)
To: 


I'm new to this list so I don't knw if this question has been posed
before or not. Anyway, I'm a history and anthropology student who just
recently took up quilting and am really interesting in making fairly
accurate historical quilts. I'm mainly interested in Colonial History
(I'll be going on to grad school shortly to work on a Ph.D. in Southern
Colonial history). If anyone could possibly know of where I could get
information to help me with these sorts of quilts (patterns, fabrics,
etc.) it would be GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks,

Sarah in Central Wisconsin where we're still trying to dig out from this
>last storm of 22"!

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 18:15:30 -0500 (EST)
From: Karen108@delphi.com
To: qhl@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Finnish feedsacks
Message-id: <01IGNO4E0Z2I9ZP7F5@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Virpi - American feed and flour sacks during the first half of the century
often were of soft cottons or calico prints. I saw a collection of old ones
for sale at a quilt show on Saturday and many were in bright colors and
patterns. Jane at baglady111@aol.com is the real expert - I know more about
pre-1600 quilts than 1930's quilts!

Welcome, and I hope you enjoy the list!

Karen Evans
Springfield, Massachusetts

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 97 10:02:35 +09-30
From: geolink@ozemail.com.au
To: qhl <qhl@cuenet.com>
Subject: QHL: Book list
Message-ID: <Chameleon.858731967.geolink@john-humphries>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

G'day there everyone- in the midst of getting our pc upgraded
we lost all our saved mail in the various folders. Could I
please have a list of the qhl book titles that have been
recommended to and by this list.

I am just about to quilt an old looking 4 patch that I have
recently made up - and also I have to quilt a queen size
candlewick top that I have just finished the candlewicking on
(this one is for brother in law and his partner's wedding in
July).

All the best - from the warm Australian tropics where we have
just finished a record "Wet Season" : 2.5 metres of rain in 6
months.
g'day from Leanne.
--------------------------------------------------------
Leanne McGill and John Humphries ~ ~
Geolink Pty Ltd * *
PO Box 886, Palmerston 0831
Northern Territory, Australia. \__/
Phone:(08)89831905 Fax:(08)89831334
geolink@ozemail.com.au "Say G'Day & Smile!"
--------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 19:44:16 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To:
Karen, in reading your post to our Finland friend..I am curious..since you are
interested in 1600's and earlier quilts..what about the patterns? Are you
involved with those as well? Do you know which patterns were more prevelant?
Are thier facts on them? How far back can you go with quilts? Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 18 Mar 1997 21:23:13 -0500 (EST)
From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>
To:

Leanne (and everyone else!)

I did put together a web page of Book Reviews - you can get there from our
home page .  It is a compilation of book reviews that I have cut and pasted from various postings to various lists over the years, literally. If anyone would like
to add their review, just send it to me, I'll be glad to add it.

Speaking of book reviews! Rutledge Hill called today to tell me that Better
Homes and Gardens would be publishing an article in the April issue that
discussed their new book Quilts of Migrating Women; a Mennonite story. They
wanted to make sure I ordered enough:-)) So I did - I hope. I also ordered
some extra copies of For Purpose and Pleasure for those who want them.

I let my subscription to BH&G lapse (I don't have time to read all the
magazines I get now!) so if anyone sees this article, please let me know.

Kris
------------------------------

 

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 10:00:13 -0500 (EST)
From: MHerron4@aol.com
Hey folks,
    I love this digest and save each issue as a word processing digest as they
are so rich with information! I feel guilty I don't have much to contribute
on textile history so I thought I'd write you about some quilting fiction
books you all might enjoy....I was excited to find a book available as an
unabridged book on tape at my library, the beauty of a book on tape is one
can quilt and enjoy a good mystery at the same time! It's called Stitches in
Time by Barbara Michaels and is available through Recorded Books Inc.
1-800-638-1304. They do rentals through the mail and it's 13.5 hours of good
listening. I'm on cassette 3 out of 10 and love it. The narrator is
excellent and that is very important to listening to a book on tape. Here's
the blurb from the back: "Rachel Grant has never been able to resist the
allure of finely crafted quilts and clothes from times gone by. So when an
antique bridal quilt mysteriously appears at the vintage clothing store where
she works, Rachel is instantly drawn to it. The quilt is exquisite,
mesmerizing ... and dangerously powerful.
    Hidden in the bridal quilt's stitches is a sinister curse from the past, a
legacy of revenge and deception that threatens to destroy Rachel's hard-won
happiness. At first Rachel refuses to believe that such a beautiful heirloom
can contain black magic. But day by day, she feels the quilt's power
growing, forcing her to re-enact a shattering tragedy from another century-a
tragedy that noone knows how to stop."
    This blurb doesn't touch upon the fact that the author has a genuine
knowledge of quilts reflected in her loving descriptions. All in all I give
it 5 thimbles on a one to 5 scale as a good read (listen)!! Til my next
review ..this is Mary in South Central CT where the first crocuses are
making a timid appearance and risking leaf and stem to freeze and frost!

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 10:04:47 -0500 (EST)
From: MHerron4@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: A fun quilting mystery!
Message-ID: <970319095940_-2040223040@emout08.mail.aol.com>

Hey folks,
    I love this digest and save each issue as a word processing digest as they
are so rich with information! I feel guilty I don't have much to contribute
on textile history so I thought I'd write you about some quilting fiction
books you all might enjoy....I was excited to find a book available as an
unabridged book on tape at my library, the beauty of a book on tape is one
can quilt and enjoy a good mystery at the same time! It's called Stitches in
Time by Barbara Michaels and is available through Recorded Books Inc.
1-800-638-1304. They do rentals through the mail and it's 13.5 hours of good
listening. I'm on cassette 3 out of 10 and love it. The narrator is
excellent and that is very important to listening to a book on tape. Here's
the blurb from the back: "Rachel Grant has never been able to resist the
allure of finely crafted quilts and clothes from times gone by. So when an
antique bridal quilt mysteriously appears at the vintage clothing store where
she works, Rachel is instantly drawn to it. The quilt is exquisite,
mesmerizing ... and dangerously powerful.
    Hidden in the bridal quilt's stitches is a sinister curse from the past, a
legacy of revenge and deception that threatens to destroy Rachel's hard-won
happiness. At first Rachel refuses to believe that such a beautiful heirloom
can contain black magic. But day by day, she feels the quilt's power
growing, forcing her to re-enact a shattering tragedy from another century-a
tragedy that noone knows how to stop."
    This blurb doesn't touch upon the fact that the author has a genuine
knowledge of quilts reflected in her loving descriptions. All in all I give
it 5 thimbles on a one to 5 scale as a good read (listen)!! Til my next
review ..this is Mary in South Central CT where the first crocuses are
making a timid appearance and risking leaf and stem to freeze and frost!

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 11:04:21 -0000
From: "Sue McClure" <suzy@albany.net>

I hope some of you knowledgeable people out there can help me find a book
that will help with identifying antique fabric. Is there one that has color
photos of them? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Sue McClure
(suzy@albany.net)

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 08:11:44 -0800
From: ayjones@tacoma.nwrain.net (Yvonne Jones)
To: QHL@cue.com
Subject: QHL: A Good Quilt Book
Message-Id: <v01520d02af55bb2397ca@[205.134.204.210]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Quilt friends,

I just wanted to share with you a quilt book that I like.QUILTS Their
Story and How To Make Them, by Marie D. Webster."This book not only tells
the history of quilts with all the pleasant sentiment connected with them,
but shows clearly and with interest in historical details how quilts can be
made to-day. There are a great many illustrations showing both old and
modern designs, sixteen pages in full colors, and large number of outline
drawings of individual patterns". This book was published in 1915.

The reason I am so excited is I have been looking for this book for about 5
years. I have been on several book searches and I just received in the mail
yesterday the first printing edition of the book. This book has a number of
reprints and is available today. Marie Webster designed beautiful applique
patterns and had her own pattern company several years after publishing
this first of its kind quilt book.

One of my first quilts in my antique quilt collection is French Baskets
designed by Marie Webster.The quilt is in blue, with white baskets and pink
flowers.The lady I purchased it from said her grandmother made it for her
for a wedding gift and she never did like it.The quilt is very well done! I
had a rule in our house that if there was a fire grab the French Baskets
first. I now have several other very nice quilts so I would try to grab
them all.
Yvonne
QUILT-R

ayjones@tacoma.nwrain.net
The QUILT-R :)

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 11:45:53 -0500 (EST)
From: JZgliniec@aol.com

Dear Sue and all,

The best book for photographs AND text for all periods is :

Textile Designs. by Susan Meller and Joost Elffers . c.1991. Harry.N. Abrams
Inc., Publishers. New York.

ISBN 0-8109-3853-7

This is a pretty hefty book....both is size and price. I has 1000 +
ilustrations in color and costs 65 - 75 depending.

Regards, Julia....Poway, CA.....heat wave today...80+ inland whre I live.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 16:59:41 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Diane's Civil War quilt
Message-ID: <970319165745_209619892@emout20.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

Awhile back one of our QHL members told the story about finding a civil war
crazy quilt made from Union and Confederate uniforms in a Georgia antique
store. I was fascinated by this story and Diane (forgive me if I've given
the wrong name) sent me her information about this quilt. Now there is a
person on the AOL Quilt Forum who is looking for information about this
quilt. I don't know if she belongs to QHL or not.

If you see this, Diane, would you be kind enough to e-mail MENISAM@aol.com
about your quilt? Her real name is Merissa.

Thanks, Nancy in VA
AJSNGS@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 17:39:03 -0500 (EST)
From: Quiltfix@aol.com
To: qhl@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Warning! - more quilts - long entry - I'm excited
Message-ID: <970319173809_1614537108@emout01.mail.aol.com>

This must be my own personal quilt month.

I nearly wet my pants, I was so excited last night over a box I received from
my maternal aunt, Sara (no "h"). Her eldest son, my cousin, came for a
visit the first of the month. He must've gone and told my secret, because I
had an e-mail from Aunt Sara. Last time I heard from her was Christmas 1995.
Anyway, she asked if I'd look at some quilts she had - two were made by
Gremom Decker (PA Dutch family term I guess - this is my great grandmother)
and one came from my Great Aunt Bertha (don't know yet if she made it). Of
course, I said yes. She started to back off on one - "too far gone" - but I
told her to send it on anyway. My skills are really good, and besides, I had
an ulterior motive. I wanted to see it! Well, they came last night. All
three.

The first I opened was a quilt composed of nine embroidered blocks, c.1930.
Variegated blue thread was used. There are a couple of *those* 30's style
baskets, a peacock, etc. Wonderful embroidery, not faded. Sashed with a
country blue and bordered in white. Lots of quilting, but the top has hand
wear. The fabric is disintegrating. Someone had already trimmed down the
top border once. Bound in nasty blue of another vintage. My guess is that
it was bindingless originally. Y'know, turn the edges in. My gremom and
grandma liked that finish. I think gremom made this one, cause Mom remembers
a redwork quilt that she mad for Aunt Sara as a child.

The next was a 30's applique. Vines. A center medallion of leaves and
embroidered green stems. Two vine borders. On white and bound with green.
Some leaves are gone and the embroidery is thin in spots. One part of the
stem is white (guess she used another thread!). A beauty. This one I'd
guess came from Aunt Bertha, since I don't know that Gremom did any real
applique.

The last is the real kicker for me. A plain basket quilt, c.1940. White
background. Edges turned under to finish. Good quilting. Unfortunately,
some color loss in the baskets from bleacing (aargh!). Yellowed. Nothing
exciting until you understand that I have the twin to this quilt! My quilt
was pieced by Gremom and quilted by Grandma and her church bee. Except for a
few of the baskets, dimensions and fabric placement are exact. I have to
assume that this one was made at the same time. Maybe it was made for the
cousin who visited, being the first-born like me. I had no idea the other
quilt existed. I've e-mailed Aunt Sara about this - did she know? I'm going
to wash it and take lots of pictures of them together. Also have to find out
if Mom knows about this other quilt.

Will inquire, too, about the whereabouts of the redwork quilt. Finally, I
have no morals whatsoever. I'm going to let her know that if she can't give
them to her kids, to please send them to me. I'm not greedy - huh?
Actually, they're too nice to go to someone who doesn't care. Maybe I'll
get lucky and she'll just give me the basket quilt!

Alan, rolling in quilts on a warm sunny day.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 18:34:52 -0500 (EST)
From: "Jim Twigg" <jtwigg@radix.net> (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ

I have begun collecting blocks and quilts whose main design element is a
letter of the alphabet. The letters T and H are the easiest to find ( due
to the Temperance Union and the 4-H clubs, I've been told). I've seen
pictures of V quilts ( V for victory in the war).
Recently at the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Show in Williamsburg, I purchased a
small set of P blocks made from feed sacks in Kansas City, Missouri.
I would love to hear about other letters in quilts. I would imagine most
letters have been used at some point, especially by quilters desiring to
use their first or last initial as the prominent quilt design. Maybe that's
why I bought those P blocks so quickly !
                    Phyllis Twigg
                    jtwigg@radix.net

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 18:05:25 -0500 (EST)
From: Karen108@delphi.com
To: qhl@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Very old patterns
Message-id: <01IGP1ORYSCM9YGR82@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Okay, you asked for it :)...there are no fewer than *twelve* patterns still in
use that I can document prior to the English colonization of America:

One patch/Nine Patch - used in the 6th century in China, in Europe by the 12th
century.

Triangles - 6th century in China (both of these were discovered in Tan Huang by
Sir Aurel STein in the 1920's).

Split Rail - in Europe by the 15th century (Luca Signorelli's painting of the
Crucifixion in the National Gallery in Washington).

Baby Blocks - ditto (Vittore Carpaccio's painting =The Healing of the Possessed
Man=, and possibly a German wedding dress of 1512).

Crazy Patchwork - called yosegire, this goes back in Japan at least to the
16th century and probably much earlier.

Snowball, Roman Stripe, Lemoyne Star, Forgotten Star - all of these appear in
an English chasuble believed to have been made in the 1540's (both of these
references can be found in books by Jill Liddell, =the Patchwork Pilgrimage=
and =Japanese Quilts= [with Yuko Watanabe]).

Around the Twist - appeared in a Spanish vestment of the 1280's (again, =the
Patchwork Pilgrimage=).

These are all definites - there are actual objects using these blocks in
existence. The following are *possibly* period:

Log Cabin - there's a reference in Janet Rae's =Quilts of the British Isles= to
a mid-17th century sweet bag using this block. I personally haven't seen a picture of it, and
Rae is quoting a very questionable 1920's needlework book.

Pinwheel - a 14th century Madonna and child from Siena, in the National Gallery
in Washington, depicts what might be a cloth backdrop appliqued with this
block. I'd have to see the original painting.

Irish Chain - this appears, believe it or not, in several Serbian icons dating
from the 13th to 17th centuries. One of them is so carefully drawn that the
individual sewing lines are delineated...but again, I'd have to see a better
reproduction than what I have. The same pattern shows up in modern Eastern
Orthodox vestments, and if anyone out there is Orthodox, I'd love to know if
these are pieced or not.


If anyone's interested in further information, please e-mail me - I'm glad to share!

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 19:25:20 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Fwd: Sack dying
Message-ID: <970319192351_1749085999@emout14.mail.aol.com>

In a message dated 97-03-19 14:41:27 EST, AQSG writes:

<< Subj:    Sack dying
Date:    97-03-19 14:41:27 EST
From:    AQSG
To:    Baglady111

Dear Jane,

I'm sorry, but I could not find any information on methods/recipes for home
dying of sacking. All the materials we have don't go into that kind of
detail; and you no doubt already know of the articles in Uncoverings and
other key books.

Ruth Rhoades of Georgia will have an article on feed sacks in Uncoverings
1998; other articles of interest would be Nora Pickens' "Scrap Quilts of New
Mexico" in Uncoverings 1986 (goes into some detail about feed sacks) and Bets
Ramsey's "Design Invention in Country Quilts of Tennessee and Georgia" in
Uncoverings 1980, which does describe some methods of dying sacking but
doesn't have actual recipes.

I have a question for you--we sent a set of press releases to Deborah Kodish
of the Philadelphia Folklore Project in Philly and it was returned to us--do
you happen to know where she/they are located? She's been on our database
for quite a while and her forwarding address is expired. I know you're in
Pittsburgh, but I thought you might have an idea.

Thanks, Julia Bloch >>

This is what I received in my search for dying feedsacks..also, note the
request for the whereabouts of this lady..can anyone help?

Also, I have a friend who does small quilt projects and is looking for a
source for miniature dried roses..please let me know if you know of a
source..she wants to buy directly from the supplier..many thanx..Jane
---------------------
Forwarded message:
Subj: Sack dying
Date: 97-03-19 14:41:27 EST
From: AQSG
To: Baglady111

Dear Jane,

I'm sorry, but I could not find any information on methods/recipes for home
dying of sacking. All the materials we have don't go into that kind of
detail; and you no doubt already know of the articles in Uncoverings and
other key books.

Ruth Rhoades of Georgia will have an article on feed sacks in Uncoverings
1998; other articles of interest would be Nora Pickens' "Scrap Quilts of New
Mexico" in Uncoverings 1986 (goes into some detail about feed sacks) and Bets
Ramsey's "Design Invention in Country Quilts of Tennessee and Georgia" in
Uncoverings 1980, which does describe some methods of dying sacking but
doesn't have actual recipes.

I have a question for you--we sent a set of press releases to Deborah Kodish
of the Philadelphia Folklore Project in Philly and it was returned to us--do
you happen to know where she/they are located? She's been on our database
for quite a while and her forwarding address is expired. I know you're in
Pittsburgh, but I thought you might have an idea.

Thanks, Julia Bloch

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 19:45:23 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com

I think she'll see it, nancy..I just sent her an email but didn't keep her
address..I'll see if I have it in my notebook if youd don't find her..she and
hubby both have ill parents..rough going right now..she'll probably enjoy
getting another subject to think on..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 23:23:13 -0800
From: bwblack@sprynet.com (Barbara Black)
Re: QHL: dating fabrics
>>I hope some of you knowledgeable people out there can help me find a book
>that will help with identifying antique fabric. Is there one that has color
>photos of them? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Sue McClure
>(suzy@albany.net)

What about Barbara Brackman's _Clues in the Calico_? Not all the photos are
color, but many are. My quilt study group uses this book quite a bit as a
reference.
Barbara Wunder Black
bwblack@sprynet.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 06:49:30 -0500
From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: civil war, colonial quilts & more
Message-Id: <v01540b1baf56ccb7c727@[168.121.76.43]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Taymor....did I share the story of the Marietta Civil War quilt with this
group? (being dragged in the mud by the yankees)? I almost got a picture of
it but the owner changed her mind. She is granddaughter of the maker and
very, very elderly.

I have just finished an article about Victorian Crazy quilts for Country
Collectibles magazine.

As for Colonial History quilts....one good source is an old one but a good
one. It is The Romance Of The Patchwork Quilt by Kresinger and Carrie Hall.
A reprint of their book was done by the American Quilter's Society a few
years back. I have the original book.

otherwise, anything by Carter Houck would be very helpful. Her books are
historically correct and have some very early quilts with photos, etc.

Jean Ann Eitel
Editor, QUILT magazine
http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk
http://www.quilttalk.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 04:53:31 -0700
From: Jim/Candy Goff <mtbeau@ism.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: new quilting web site......
Message-Id: <l03020905af56d58a16d3@[205.226.97.68]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hoping you will find time to visit my new web site @
http://www.marsweb.com/~mtbeau. Any and all
replies will be appreciated.....Candy Goff

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 00:05:47 +1100
From: Li Joo Ng <lijoo@vermont.starway.net.au>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Hello! I'm back!
Message-Id: <199703201305.AAA20532@vermont.starway.net.au>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi, everybody, does anyone vaguely remember me? The last time I posted was
early January, and after that I was away overseas for 7 weeks. I came back
late February, but had severe problems with my e-mail, so in the end I had
to apply for this new one - long story. But it's great to be back!!
If anyone e-mailed me since early January, my apologies for lack of reply.
Computer and e-mail problems - very frustrating - I'm so sorry.

Merikay Waldvogel, if you are reading this, could you e-mail me, please. I
would like to get in touch with you again, regarding your book and also
information on the maker of my quilts, Fannie Ellen Wilcox Michael.

This is my new e-mail address, everyone, so don't send me stuff to the old
one anymore.

Guess what? I just purchased a few things!! I bought a Rob Peter To Pay Paul
quilt top, a Rail Fence quilt and a number of Grandmother's Flower Garden
blocks. They are supposed to arrive in the mail by next week. Will share
further details then. In the meantime, waiting for them is agony!!

Love from Melbourne, Australia. (It's the first month of autumn over here.)
LiJoo
<lijoo@vermont.starway.net.au>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 08:09:28 -0500
From: gridgees@algorithms.com (Merry May)

So, Karen, are you telling us that it's likely that quilting originated in
the Far East? I've suspected that for quite some time, but haven't seen
any documentation of it until now. Thanks for sharing with us!

Merry in southern N.J.
gridgees@algorithms.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 09:12:42 -0500 (EST)
From: JZgliniec@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Very old patterns
Message-ID: <970320091241_1409967165@emout12.mail.aol.com>

In a message dated 97-03-19 18:42:53 EST, you write:

<< Karen108@delphi.com >>
Dear Karen,

Thank you for the excellent post. I have several questions before I try to
look up some of these designs in my books.

Are these quilted Items or are they pieced clothing?

Would some of these designs be considered "Allover" patterns as opposed to
the block format used by quilters?

Have you seen the pictures of the wrapped mummified cats ? They were popular
in Great Brittian after the discovery of the Tombs in Egypt last century....I
have only a terrible photocopy of a picture someone sent me and no
documentation to go with it, the photo has a cat. no 50.....but no other
reference. The cat is wrapped with strips of linen in a "courthouse steps "
configuration, repeat block.

Thank you,
Julia

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 09:52:27 -0800
From: Jody Bordner <qltgrose@gte.net>
To: Jim/Candy Goff <mtbeau@ism.net>
CC: QHL@cuenet.com


Candy,

Your web page is fantastic!! BRAVO! I rushed to open "Jewel Box",
thinking it to be the old pattern Jewel Box and was blown away when I saw
your design! WOW! Also, wish I could see more of the detail of the
quilting on that Whig quilt--though Paul Pilgrim may have wanted more
visual impact, I bet the impact of the stitches on another quilter would
be dynamic--sure as heck would impress me anyway! But then I love whole
cloth quilts too, so maybe that is why! <G>

Piece,
Jody

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 01:12:02 +1100
From: Li Joo Ng <lijoo@vermont.starway.net.au>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: continuous line quilting
Message-Id: <199703201412.BAA20830@vermont.starway.net.au>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I would like to know what everybody thinks of continuous line quilting. You
know, the kind that is done on one of those big industrial machines (Gammill
is the brand, I think). I just sent a couple of my quilt tops away to be
continously quilted on those machines. They should be back in about 3 to 4
weeks' time. It's my first time doing this, so in the meantime, I am sitting
here, chewing out my nails with worry.

I would like to hear from anybody, especially those who have had experience
with this, whether your experience was a good or bad one.

Thanks, everyone.

LiJoo
Melbourne, Australia - where autumn feels like winter already!

------------------------------

DDate: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 09:42:19 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Ancient quilt history
Message-ID: <970320094216_-902280176@emout12.mail.aol.com>

THANX FOR ASKING THAT MERRY..I would enjoy seeing any photos/or a source for
photos..of those mentioned, Karen..and I need your email too..or can anyone
share it? I got knocked off line last night, in the midst of posting back to
her..and I look forward to in depth dicussion/info..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 10:09:12 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Advertising
Message-ID: <970320100911_721326633@emout03.mail.aol.com>

I have a product in its final stages of development. Its targeted
purchasers are quilters and those that love them. Is there an
appropriate way to sell this through QHL?

Hint: It is very sweet.

--Kimberly in dreary looking Bristol

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 10:14:14 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: BLACK QUILT-MAKERS
Message-ID: <970320101414_-1505185620@emout11.mail.aol.com>

there was a terrific article in the PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE yesterday..QUILT
of many COLORS..Black quilt-makers offer new hues and patterns while
preserving family lore..
does anyone know if this is public domain that I can share some of it with
you? And i wonder if any of the quilters are on line?? jane

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 14:14:01 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Philadelphia Folklore Project
Message-ID: <970320141351_247698085@emout06.mail.aol.com>

In the QHL message:
>Subject: QHL: Fwd: Sack dying
>Sent: 3/20/97 1:33 AM

Julia Bloch asks:

>> I have a question for you--we sent a set of press releases to Deborah
Kodish
>of the Philadelphia Folklore Project in Philly and it was returned to us--do
>you happen to know where she/they are located? She's been on our database
>for quite a while and her forwarding address is expired. I know you're in
>Pittsburgh, but I thought you might have an idea. >>

Here's the information she's looking for and a description of
Philadelphia Folklore Project for the rest of us.

Philadelphia Folklore Project
1304 Wharton Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147
phone: 215-468-7871
fax: 215-468-7874

The Philadelphia Folklore Project exsists to: (1) assist local artists
and grass root cultural groups in finding and getting applications
together for grants; (2) document and archive via video, audio, slides
and photography local artists' work; (3) prepare publications based on
the feild work they've done (mainly children's books and a magazine based
on their research); and (4) prepare periodic exhibitons and a concert of
local artists.

The artists they work with are most often those who have been
traditionally trained, i.e. from family, self-taught, etc. as opposed to
school-taught.

Most of their textile work centers on that of Sout East Asian
description. They have worked with some guilds but find they are mostly
self-sufficient, needing little outside assitance.

Respectfully submitted by

Kimberly in dreary Bristol, PA

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 17:56:08 -0500 (EST)
From: Quiltfix@aol.com
To: 


I have declared this month to be Red and Green Quilt Month, at least what's
left of it.

I just saw a quilt that put my applique to shame. That was quite a trick. I
was previewing an auction at lunch today - was sent to check out a table.
Instead, I saw the most magnificent red and green applique. I'm talking
major coffee table book material. To start, the thing was 8.5 - 9ft square!
Seriously. In red and green calicoes, another variation on the rose wreath.
The white has aged to a caramel color. The quilting is what takes the cake -
12+ stitches to the inch! The border is a series of diagonals, open space
separated by four rows of quilting 1/16" apart. Crosshatched quilting at
1/4". Baskets. Stuffed work, even if most of it has been beaten down to
nothing over decades. Very thin battiing.

If you will be in the Massacussetts area in August 97, let me know, and I'll
keep track of the quilt. The auction house owner is having a major sale
(we're talking color catalog and all) and this will be one of the items.
Since I *know* that all restoration people are rich, I'm certain one of you
can scarf it up! But seriously, I will be sure to follow up and let you know
where it'll be. It'd be worth the drive, 'cause he'll let you fondle it.

Alan, who has yet to figure out where all these great quilts are coming from
in the south. He's not complaining, just curious.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 18:03:20 -0500 (EST)
From: Quiltfix@aol.com

One other thing - this quilt is 1840-1860, easy!

Alan

 

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 22:51:39 -0500 (EST)
From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net
Cassie Neumann (cneumann@verinet.com) E-mailed me and asked me if I had ever
heard of a book that gives step-by-step sewing/quilting instructions for
children. I can't think of any, can anyone else?

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 20 Mar 1997 23:11:18 -0500 (EST)
From: QuiltLine@aol.com
In a message dated 97-03-20 22:04:19 EST, you write:

<<
Re: QHL: dating fabrics
>>I hope some of you knowledgeable people out there can help me find a book
>that will help with identifying antique fabric. Is there one that has color
>photos of them? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Sue McClure
>(suzy@albany.net)
>>

AQS is publishing a book by Eileen Trestain sometime this year (later rather
than earlier, that from what I understand is full color and a wonderful
fabric dating tool. Eileen has been collecting fabrics for years and years.
I have many a fabric dating book, all mentioned here, yet not one that I am
really happy with. There is definately a need for a good one - hopefully the
AQS one will be it.

Debbie Roberts

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 06:33:14 -0500 (EST)
From: Karen108@delphi.com
To: qhl@cuenet.com
I've received so many requests for more information that I'm going to do
a couple of fairly long posts (not this morning, I have to get to work! :) ).
But I have plenty of information, with documentation, on pre-1600 quilting,
patchwork and applique. I'm in a medieval re-enactment group and decided to
see what would be appropriate to do at events, and seven years later....:)

BTW, if anyone went to the Hands Across the Valley show last weekend, one of
quilts in it was my 14th century style linen quilt. It will also be in
CraftAdventure at the Big E in August (I wasn't going to enter, but the person
who runs CraftAdventure basically *ordered* me to do so!) and at some other
area shows. I'll also be there to answer questions....

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 06:24:17 -0500 (EST)
From: Karen108@delphi.com
To: qhl@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: ancient quilts
Message-id: <01IGR607CUH49YGUDI@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

As far as anyone can tell, the oldest quilted objects found to date are
from China and the Far East. The oldest patchwork is the stuff from Tan
Huang (several votive hangings and a relic bag - there's a picture in Averil
Colby's =Patchwork=), the oldest quilt is a Scythian tomb rug from about
the first century C.E. (picture in Colby's =Quilting= - her stuff is
marvelous and not nearly as well known as it should be), and the oldest
applique some fascinating things like horse blankets and herb bags found in
a frozen tomb in Siberian, dated about 500 B.C.E. One of the bags still hd
some traces of its contents, which turned out to be marijuana! National
Geographic had a whole special about the frozen tombs a couple of years ago,
which is still broadcast on The Learning Channel, plus an article.

So yes, it does look like quilting originated in Asia. It's tough to get
more information because a lot hasn't been translated yet (same with getting
information from eastern Europe).

Jane - quick and dirty pattern list (remind me to e-mail details privately):
crazy patchwork, one patch/nine patch, triangles, Split Rail, Star of Lemoyne,
Snowball, Around the Twist, Forgotten Star, Roman Stripe, Baby Blocks, possibly
Log Cabin. It's too !%#$@#^# early in the morning to remember ! :)

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 10:22:27 -0500 (EST)
From: SarahOz@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Wanted...
Message-ID: <970321102226_1083944682@emout06.mail.aol.com>

There is a set of books that give children step by step directions to make a
quilt. I can't think of the name off the top of my head, I will look when I
get to work today...if no one else knows. All I can remember about them is
that they are mostly black cover, spiral binding and there are 3-4 of them.

Maybe this will jog someone else's memory...if not I'll post later today.

Rose
Tempe, AZ

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 06:37:32 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Wanted...
Message-ID: <970321063730_-1571787493@emout10.mail.aol.com>

Hi all,

Actually there is a book out for teaching children to quilt. It's new,
because I just saw it in a magazine. I'll look for the ad and find out what
the name is and post it here.

Nancy in VA

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 10:22:39 -0500 (EST)
From: SarahOz@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: continuous line quilting
Message-ID: <970321102234_1682159594@emout14.mail.aol.com>

There is a business here run by two ladies that do continuous line machine
quilting. It is beautiful. I've always been hesitant on having a quilt
machine quilted, but I would gladly give them a quilt to machine quilt for
me. The patterns I've seen them use to enhance a quilt are wonderful.

Rose
Tempe AZ

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 10:39:27 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Kids quilting book
Message-ID: <970321103926_-704319375@emout10.mail.aol.com>

My sis-in-law is Philadelphia area co-ordinator for ABCQuilts: At risk
Baby Crib Quilts.

ABCQuilts makes and distributes quilts for babies born "at-risk": HIV+,
AIDS, Drug addicted, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, etc. They have a book:
Kids Making Quilts for Kids; by ABC Quilts; published by Quilt Digest
Press; ISBN 0913327360 or ISBN 084422636X (it has 2 numbers). The book
is available in bookstores, fabric stores, and libraries.

You can see more about this book and ABC Quilts at
<http://www.jbu.edu/ABCQuilts> . Theye also have a page of links to other
quilting sites.

This is truely a great project for children to participate in.

--Kimberly, who expects to put together a top soon on her new Baby Lock
serger!

------------------------------Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 22:58:55 -0800
From: "Arlene G. Goldberg" <arlenegg@icanect.net>
To: QUILTING HERITAGE LISTSERVE <QHL@cue.com>
Subject: QHL: oldest quilts
Message-ID: <3333832F.47D@icanect.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

> ...the oldest applique some fascinating things like horse blankets and > herb bags found in a frozen tomb in Siberian, dated about 500 B.C.E.

Are you sure about this date? I would have thought that applique went
back long before then. Anxious to read more.

Arlene
arlenegg@icanect.net

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 03:57:41 -0500 (EST)
From: NYeaton@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Red and Green Month
Message-ID: <970322035740_-1169787382@emout04.mail.aol.com>

I would love to see this quilt. Can you post an address/phone number? I
return to MA occasionally.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 03:57:43 -0500 (EST)
From: NYeaton@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Wanted...
Message-ID: <970322035742_-1102981495@emout05.mail.aol.com>

Yes, that is me. Miriam Cahill-Yeaton
1117 Boston Rd
Andrews AFB, MD
20762

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 09:46:54 -0500 (EST)
From: SHall9999@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V97 #78
Message-ID: <970322094653_-1672337685@emout14.mail.aol.com>

I will be leaving town for a while, please take me off the list. I will
contact QHL when I get back to get started again.

Thanks
Marian (Sami) Hall
shall9999@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 19:48:21 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: ancient quilts
Message-ID: <970322194820_-1169733427@emout15.mail.aol.com>

WOW!! Great post Karen..!! Kris, do you have the Averil Colby book that
Karen mentions? And is Averil on line??Would be wonderful to ahe her and YOU,
Karen..join together with info..as you seem to have the same interest..I just
find it fascinating to have revelations,such as yours.Karen..tell us something
totally opposite of whate we thought to be th basis of our history..thanks,
Karen..a great thread..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 19:51:58 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: 


Many thanx for the info on the 'blue' address to click on..I have teh
hearts..wioll have to see if i hve the hot-link..I appreicate the
answer..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 19:58:10 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: 


There was a mesg on my machine from a lady who started the ABC group..I took
it to mean the ORIGINAL LADY??? Or maybe is was a chapter lady..I'm guessing
she saw my post that we will accept you rtool/product to demo at
convention..she said she would call back but..no call..if anyone knows who it
is or if she is reading this psot..tell me how i can help..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 21:24:23 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Feedsacks
Message-ID: <970322212422_1019805744@emout07.mail.aol.com>

Hi all,

I've been antiquing in the past few days, and as I shared with Jane from THE
FEEDSACK CLUB, thanks to her sending me some feedsack charms, I'm finding
that I'm able to identify the feedsacks in various quilts that I've seen.
Six months ago this would not have been possible. In fact, six months ago I
remember seeing two quilts in an antique store that were labeled "feedsack"
quilts. I had no idea what they were talking about because the fabrics were
all prints! I had no idea that feedsacks could be printed in various colors
and patterns. I was also sharing with Jane that I've found a number of
feedsacks with logos on them, but didn't know their value since I had no idea
which companies were considered "more valuable". This is such an interesting
learning process! I'd be interested in hearing from others who have an
interest in feedsacks, about the various "finds" they have come across. I've
heard about Wizard of Oz bags, Disney bags, etc. but have yet to find one!

Nancy in VA (where we've been looking at the comet!)


 

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 21:23:24 -0600
From: R D <holmr@execpc.com>
In the latest issue of the Clotilde sewing catalog -- on page 81-- are
several book that help children learn to sew. A few have the basic
title "I'll teach myself" and then different subtitles such as Sewing
Machine Fun. I think that these are the books that you are talking
about. You can get the books alone, or the books with kits to make the
projects. Prices range from $12.80 to $28.00 (kit).

To obtain a catalog, call 800-545-4002 (no affil.) I recieved my
latest catalog just last week. Also, I know my girlfriend used one or
two of these books to get her 8 year old daughter sewing, and they both
loved it.
Donna in Wisconsin

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 22 Mar 97 19:34:50 -0800
From: beth_novak@om.cv.hp.com
Item Subject: cc:Mail Text

I recently found a "plain" feedsack with a logo for "Drifted Snow"
flour. The graphic showed a rather "buff" blond farmer holding two
stacks of grain. It's a really nice graphic! Can anyone date the
time frame? I think it said San Francisco.
Beth_Novak@om.cv.hp.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 00:12:22 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com, mwilliams@pcb.edu
Subject: QHL: This is a great list! :-)
Message-ID: <970323001222_-1906540942@emout01.mail.aol.com>

Greeting all!

I need to tell you how much I appreciate this list! I feel as though I
am going to classes right here at my computer desk. I enjoy history in
general, but really appreciate learning history more when it is about a
topic that is close to my heart. Just in the couple of months I have
been reading this list, I have learned more about quilts &c than I could
have dreamed of. Thanks to all who post and share info and suggestions!

Today my mom, TweetyBabe, and I went to "The Pride of Bethlehem" quilt
show in Bethlehem, Pa. We got there later than I wanted to, but enjoyed
the time we had. So many beautiful quilts; it was very hard to choose
just one as "Viewer's Choice."

After veiwing the quilts, I got to meet "Debbie in NJ" at her "store."
She has a real shop in Bayville, NJ but brought some very nice items to
sell at the show. (Thanks Debbie for the 'Finger Cots'. My mom got the
biggest kick when I showed them to her. She also loved the stationery.
Thanks for your assistance!)

Sadly, I didn't get to see the vendors upstairs. The hotel's fire alarm
went off 15 minutes before the end of the show. I NEEDED that 15 minutes
to SHOP! Guess I have to e-shop and snail shop. Not as was lost as
TweetyBabe got to see the fire engines and had her thrill for the day.
(She didn't like the quilts 'cause she couldn't eat cookies in that
room!) There was no problem that the firefighters could find. Just a
strange way to end a quilt show!

If anyone knows of any shows/exhibits happening in the Phila region,
please let me know. I'm hooked!

Finally, I have decided that I definately want to find an antique quilt.
If anyone knows of a quilt made in 1920's in Pennsylvania, preferably
made in Lycoming County or the Allentown area, and preferably from
feedsacks, I'd like to hear/see/read of it. It would make a nice additon
to our antique collection.

Enough said for tonight.

Happy Quilting!

--Kimberly, at home in Bristol, after another wonderful day enjoying the
art of quilts.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 06:16:20 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Feedsacks
Message-ID: <970323061619_309856233@emout07.mail.aol.com>

For Nancy in VA..we have our convention/quilt show in Lancaster Pa.. (I'll
post this info later? and our vendors will have collectables..if you are
interested in one let me know and I cn acquire one for you..you'll have to
tell me a limit on your $$$$..you can expect to pay anywhere from $20.00 up
for a HIGHLY collectable..lst year one of our members had a 'GONE WITH THE
WIND' and I think it was $45.00..let me know..and I am so happy you were
able to put the samples to use..that offer has produced a wonderful
response..Jane

------------------------------


Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 07:39:27 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Print feedsacks
Message-ID: <970323073927_1184612434@emout08.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

For those of you who know about feedsacks, when did print feedsacks come into
existence? I'm talking about the pretty prints that you often see in
quilts--not the logo printed bags. I've found numerous logo bags in antique
stores, but have yet to find ONE print bag! Are they considered more rare?
And is the reason I'm not finding them because they all got used in
clothing, quilts, etc?

Interested and learning alot,

Nancy in VA

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 07:34:44 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Finding feedsacks
Message-ID: <970323073443_-603475248@emout17.mail.aol.com>

Hi Jane and all,

I can't make it THIS year to the Feedsack convention but I'll surely try for
next year! I think part of the fun of this collecting thing is finding the
"precious treasure" yourself! My DH is always telling me he'll find me
things but I have to tell him the same thing! I want to find it myself!
Quilts have to "speak" to me before I buy them, and feedsacks need to catch
my eye. This may change as time goes on, but for now part of the pleasure
comes from the "hunt" for wonderful collectibles.

Nancy in VA

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 97 05:30:38 -0800
From: beth_novak@om.cv.hp.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Printed Feedsack
Message-Id: <H000037a0a7c2f21@MHS>

Item Subject: cc:Mail Text

I just wanted to mention that there is a feedsack with a doll printed
on the back of it for auction on the ebay webpage. It's in the
antiques, 100 yrs or less catagory. There is a photo. I expect the
bidding to go higher than its worth but some members may want to see
it anyway.
http://www.ebay.com/aw/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 09:23:57 +0400
From: xecord@netusa1.net (Xenia Cord)
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Upcoming shows
Message-Id: <199703231423.JAA29115@gatem02.netusa1.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi, all! To review events in the Lancaster (PA) area in the next couple of
weeks, the Quilters Heritage Celebration will be held at the Lancaster Host
(Holiday Inn) April 3-6, with hundreds of quilts, vendors in 2 large halls
in the hotel building itself, and also at the indoor tennis courts
building. This is a major show. (As a vendor of antique quilts, tops,
blocks, fabric etc., I will have feedsacks and Singer Featherweights.) See
http://sandbox.delphi.co,/quilting/quiltsho.html for show listings; also
see http://www.excel-online.com/qhc/qhclobby.html for show information.

At the same time The Feedsack Club is having its convention (see posts
from Jane, aka BagLady), and Featherweight Fanatics are planning a meet
across the street from the Host (all on Lincoln Hwy East). To contact
Featherweight Fanatics go to FWFanatics@ttsw.com. Also going on is an
exhibit called The Quilts of Adams County 1830-1840 (Gettysburg) in
Schmucker Hall of Gettysburg College gallery (M-F 10-3, Sat-Sun 1-4).
This exhibit shows the quilts presented in the 1993 book The Hands That
Made Them (still available).

Sorry if this is a rehash of previously submitted stuff, but it ought to be
enough to keep us all busy!
Xenia, in Indiana

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 09:30:35 -0500 (EST)
From: AMDOODAH@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Dead Quilts
Message-ID: <970323093035_-1069336227@emout20.mail.aol.com>

When is an old quilt ready to rejoin it's maker ? As a textile obsessive and
dealer, I take apart lots of old tied comforters to reclaim the fabrics for
further use by my customers - some of these fabrics will ultimately have been
admired and used by more generations than we can imagine. Inside some of
these comforters are layers of history - other old quilts and comforters that
were
so tattered they were used as filler for the newest reincarnation of a
warmth-producing bed cover. The process was repeated over and over until the
thing got so heavy it was almost bone-crushing. (Then it "became" a
mattress.) My filler record so far is five layers - it is a real treasure
hunt!! (Beware - this kind of expedition often leaves you with swollen eyes,
runny nose, hives, etc. - can you even imagine what history these fillers
have observed ? Some X-rated, I'll bet!) Anyway - many of the filler quilts
are is such bad shape that nothing can be reclaimed and I don't have the
time or energy to take out the quilting stitches and turn them into the
ninteenth century rag balls that are in bowls all over my house. Yet, they
have recognizable fabrics, patterns, etc. and I'm having a hard time just
throwing them away. Any suggestions that will eliminate my guilt
feelings about putting someone's much-loved family member into a big trash
bag
and tossing it out?

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 09:31:01 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Print feedsacks
Message-ID: <970323093100_1184623501@emout06.mail.aol.com>

Just the opposite, nancy..your prints are more plentifull..you'll find them
at auctions/yard/estate sales.they're out there..keep looking..the prints
came into eing in the 20's/30's..I'll post on it soon..jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 09:38:51 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com

Absolutely..something will catch your eye..and the next thing you know..you
are collecting..if he is a collector, I doubt he would want you doing HIS
shopping..I had a friend whose hubby did that to her..problem being, he was a
control freak and never so much as looked for anything for her..he controlled
what she wanted to do and what she would spend..all he'd say was, 'no they
didn't hav anything,or what they had you wouldnt' want, I didn't ahve enough
money with me, by the time I went back they had closed"..he was a
genious.,.til her friends clued her in..luckily she had friends smarter than
her and HIM too..
It makes me wonder how many collections begin with a casual buy..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 09:42:59 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com


In a message dated 97-03-23 09:06:24 EST, MAILER-DAEMON@aol.com (Mail
Delivery Subsystem) writes:

<<
I have a question for a person just starting up a business..she needs to
know..if she has her product, let's say it is a pattern, and you have placed
them in shops..someone comes up to you and wants to buy one or some..is it
ok
to sell to her or do yu refer her to the shop (s)..
2nd if the shop is in CA and the buyer is in TN..do you sell to her or
advise contacting the shop? I'd appreciate your input for the lady..Jane
>>
this bounced back to me so trying it again..jane

---------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 09:59:55 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: "Drifted Snow" feedsack
Message-ID: <970323095954_-2006245600@emout19.mail.aol.com>

Beth, I have the site up..where do I go to see that doll?? If i can't find
it please keep me posted on the price..jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 10:01:02 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Lemoyne Star vs Star of Bethlehem
Message-ID: <970323100102_247983049@emout16.mail.aol.com>

I am puzzled and seeing stars.

In the postcard books, "Anitque Quilts Postcards from the Newark Museum,"
and "Amish Quilt Cards in Full Color from the Collection of the Museum of
American Folk Art" (produced by Dover Publicatons), there are 4 quilts
and 3 quilts respectively that are based on the same multi-diamond star
pattern but have different names.

What is the difference between:
(1) the Lemoyne Star or Star of Lemoyne pattern,
(2) the Star of Bethlehem pattern,
(3) the Lone Star pattern,
(4) the Broken Star pattern, and
(5) the Ship's Wheel pattern?

They all seem very similar to me. Are they the same pattern with certain
variences? What distinguishes one from another? Are there other names
for this type of star?

This is a beautiful pattern type and probably my favorite. I would like
to learn more about it.

Thanks for your response in advance! :-)

--Kimberly

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 10:11:22 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Dead Quilts
Message-ID: <970323101121_-1972686040@emout03.mail.aol.com>

Maybe this will help..I had an 1800's top..lots of browns/blues/blacks//and
ti was pretty far gone..it was a wonderful teaching tool..so it went to a
friend who was about to take a 'dating' course from BARBARA BRACKMAN..if
nothing more, it is a visual tool.there might be someone out there that would
like it simply as a guide wo show what they fabrics looked like, for
identification, etc..the normal type feedsack is easy to identify..but the
ones that are like percale can be a problem..sometimes, unless I recognize
the pattern I have no idea..(CLUES IN THE CALICO??) hope this helps..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 10:16:16 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Upcoming shows
Message-ID: <970323101615_1517823532@emout01.mail.aol.com>

Xenia..thank you very much for posting about teh FEEDSACK SHOW..we are jsut
one mile down the road at HO JO's..same side of RT 30/Lincoln Highway..we
are open fromn 9am top 9pm (or later)..and please..let me know yhour booth
number so we can send our members up to see your feedsacks..and you must come
down and check out ours..thanx again..I'll be posting soon too and will add
YOUR info..jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 12:38:00 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Re: selling (wholesale v retail)
Message-ID: <970323123759_-1437852841@emout02.mail.aol.com>

Reguarding Jane's post:

>I have a question for a person just starting up a business..she needs to
>know..if she has her product, let's say it is a pattern, and you have placed
>them in shops..someone comes up to you and wants to buy one or some..is it
ok
>to sell to her or do yu refer her to the shop (s)..
>2nd if the shop is in CA and the buyer is in TN..do you sell to her or
>advise contacting the shop? I'd appreciate your input for the lady..Jane

I too encounter this delema. In my confectionery business, I wholesale
and retail the same items. I believe that is ok. The key is that you
don't want to undersell your retailers. If you retail sell an item to a
lone customer, they need to pay a similar price to what they would have
paid in the store.

example: My DH wanted to buy a new receiver for his RC Plane
transmitter. When he called Tower Hobbies for the appropriate model, he
was told that he would have to pay list price if he got it from them. It
was not an item that they carried in their regular sale catalog; actually
it was a discontinued model. The reason they gave was that too sell it
cheaper than list (as a policy) was that it would not be fair to the
stores that wholesale purchased it from Tower to resell to public at list
price.

My conclusion based on the information I have so far is thus: Don't
undersell your retailers on small quantities. Many products are
available both from the producer and a retailer.

In the case sited above, (my opinion is) what is important is telling the
customer where to get the pattern. Either way is ok. However, it is to
the sellers benefit to sell the pattern directly to the customer at the
retail price. She gets a bigger profit, which is what our free
enterprising society is all about.

I would be interested to see other's veiw on this topic, too.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 12:47:30 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Re: selling (wholesale v retail)
Message-ID: <970323124729_1385536469@emout17.mail.aol.com>

Thank so ver much for your input..I'll forward the info..and if others post
I'll gather them all for her..and that sounds reasonable..I know that I was
right there with the designer but had to mail tio CA..Id' not buy..glad you
mentioned that..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 11:58:20 -0600 (CST)
From: Nancy Evans <nevans@nebnet.net>
To: KBoxmeyer@aol.com
Cc: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Re: selling (wholesale v retail)
Message-Id: <199703231758.LAA21930@nebnet.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

At 12:38 PM 3/23/97 -0500, you wrote:
>
>Reguarding Jane's post:
>
>>I have a question for a person just starting up a business..she needs to
>>know..if she has her product, let's say it is a pattern, and you have placed
>>them in shops..someone comes up to you and wants to buy one or some..is it
>ok
>>to sell to her or do yu refer her to the shop (s)..
>>2nd if the shop is in CA and the buyer is in TN..do you sell to her or
>>advise contacting the shop? I'd appreciate your input for the lady..Jane
>
>I too encounter this delema. In my confectionery business, I wholesale
>and retail the same items. I believe that is ok. The key is that you
>don't want to undersell your retailers. If you retail sell an item to a
>lone customer, they need to pay a similar price to what they would have
>paid in the store.
>
>example: My DH wanted to buy a new receiver for his RC Plane
>transmitter. When he called Tower Hobbies for the appropriate model, he
>was told that he would have to pay list price if he got it from them. It
>was not an item that they carried in their regular sale catalog; actually
>it was a discontinued model. The reason they gave was that too sell it
>cheaper than list (as a policy) was that it would not be fair to the
>stores that wholesale purchased it from Tower to resell to public at list
>price.
>
>My conclusion based on the information I have so far is thus: Don't
>undersell your retailers on small quantities. Many products are
>available both from the producer and a retailer.
>
>In the case sited above, (my opinion is) what is important is telling the
>customer where to get the pattern. Either way is ok. However, it is to
>the sellers benefit to sell the pattern directly to the customer at the
>retail price. She gets a bigger profit, which is what our free
>enterprising society is all about.
>
>I would be interested to see other's veiw on this topic, too.
>
>
I would agree with you. In our area, it is not at all uncommon to see
pattern designers, book authors, etc. selling their own items at, say, a
vendors mall during a quilt show or event. But they are always careful to
retail the items they sell, because they are very aware that their wholesale
customers may have booths in the same vendor mall. The exception to this
unspoken rule may be if the author/designer has a large quantity of a
certain stock she is trying to deplete, or if there is a newer edition and
she wants to get rid of the old. But those exceptions are rare.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 13:05:47 -0500
From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Lemoyne Star vs Star of Bethlehem
Message-Id: <v01540b09af5b2048caba@[168.121.76.43]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Kboxmeyer writes....

>What is the difference between:
> (1) the Lemoyne Star or Star of Lemoyne pattern,
> (2) the Star of Bethlehem pattern,
> (3) the Lone Star pattern,
> (4) the Broken Star pattern, and
> (5) the Ship's Wheel pattern?
>
>They all seem very similar to me. Are they the same pattern with certain
>variences? What distinguishes one from another? Are there other names
>for this type of star?
>
Kimberly, the definitive book on quilt block names is Encyclopedia of
Pieced Quilt Patterns by Barbara Brackman

In this book there are over 4,000 quilt patterns. Almost every one of them
has more than one name. some of them have a dozen names! makes naming our
quilt blocks a little bit challenging. I usually look up the block and pick
the one that appeals to me the most at the moment. Not very historic maybe,
but what else to do?

the Star of Lemoyne and Lemoyne star are the same pattern. This pattern is
pretty well constant with eight diamonds making the points of the star and
set in squares and triangles to square off the block.

Bethlehem Star and Lone Star, aka Texas Star are pretty much the same
pattern. This is sort of an expanded Lemoyne Star with rows of diamonds
used for the Lemoyne Star radiating out...at least three rows are needed to
make the pattern.

Broken Star is another variation of the Lone Star,etc. It has pieced star
point diamonds surrounding the center star to make a big quilt.

As far as I can see the Ship's wheel has nothing to do with any of the
above star patterns....at least not the one I am looking at.

BUT....

just as some blocks have more than one name, some names are assigned to
more than one block....so it could be another variation of the Lemoyne Star
....

hope this clears it up, but figure it will confuse you more. :-)
------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 14:25:30 +0000
From: "Hester Butler-Ehle" <hjbe@mail.portup.com>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Lone Star Folklore?
Message-Id: <199703231925.OAA12571@portage1.portup.com>

Hi, all!

Last night I was talking to DH (yes, he's interested in quilt
history, at least to the extent that he's interested in what I
tell him about it :)) and mentioned that according to superstition
it was bad luck to make a Lone Star quilt unless you incorporated
some other design element, but I couldn't remember just why it was
supposed to be unlucky. Now of course I can't rest until I find out!
Can someone fill me in?

Hester
hjbe@portup.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 14:48:32 -0500 (EST)
From: CTislander@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Message from my past
Message-ID: <970323144831_-1939113370@emout18.mail.aol.com>

Last night my cousin gave me a soft package wrapped in tissue paper. She said
it wasn't really a
present, but she thought I ought to have it. Inside the paper was a doll
size quilt top (30"x26")
made up of little handstitched nine patches. The individual pieces are one
inch squares. The
fabric is old, but I don't know how old. There are some double pinks, some
mourning prints,
some shirtings, ginghams, and a chambray. There are two dark blue fabrics
with different small
(resist?) white designs. The other miscellaneous prints and stripes all look
pre-1930. The entire
top appears to be a young person's first effort at piecing. It is so sweet.

My cousin told me she got the little top in 1982 when we were clearing out my
mother's house. I
have no recollection of ever seeing it before. I am so grateful that my
cousin saved the top. I
know my mother never quilted, but two other family quilt tops were handed
down to me. Such a
puzzle. A message from the past that I cannot figure out. My mother was an
only child and there
is no one I can ask.

I would like to border the little top with something appropriate and finish
it as a doll quilt (affixing
a label with all the information, of course). It would be perfect to keep my
Raggedy Ann and
Andy and Beloved Belinda warm on cold days. The dolls were handmade for me in
the 1940s.

Christine T. in the California Delta

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 12:12:40 -0800 (PST)
From: Diane Lockwood <dcl@innercite.com>
To: AJSNGS@aol.com, QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Diane's civil war quilt
Message-Id: <3.0.16.19970323112554.2bc7abe4@innercite.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi Nancy,

Yes, I saw your post (been out of town for a while) and will send a copy
today to Merissa. I am so glad the old quilt is generating so much interest!

Diane


Diane Lockwood in Pollock Pines, Calif
dcl@innercite.com

"What I do today is important because I am exchanging a day of my life for it."

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 15:34:46 -0500 (EST)
From: JOCELYNM@delphi.com
To: QHL@cue.com
Subject: QHL: oldest quilts
Message-id: <01IGUI1MDOFM9ZPC1U@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

On 21-MAR-1997 23:17:43.1 arlenegg said to JOCELYNM
> > ...the oldest applique some fascinating things like horse blankets
>and > herb bags found in a frozen tomb in Siberian, dated about 500
>B.C.E.
> Are you sure about this date? I would have thought that applique went
> back long before then. Anxious to read more.
Arlene,
The problem with dating textiles is twofold:
1. they tend to deteriorate with age
2. the more ancient the object, the more likely it was that it was made
for everyday use, and that it would simply be worn out.
Surviving textiles tend to be in tombs (which means they were probably
the Sunday best of the owner, and not at all what was used every day) or
church donations (again, especially ornate). Only occasionally do you get a
situation where a person died suddenly, dressed in everyday gear, and the
textiles were somehow preserved.
Think about how many old quilts are lost because they were used as
batting for newer quilts.....
Jocelyn

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 15:35:04 -0500 (EST)
From: JOCELYNM@delphi.com
To: qhl@cue.com
Subject: QHL: Print feedsacks
Message-id: <01IGUI1WM2EM9ZPC1U@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

On 23-MAR-1997 07:45:52.4 AJSNGS said to JOCELYNM
> For those of you who know about feedsacks, when did print feedsacks
>come into existence? I'm talking about the pretty prints that you
>often see in quilts--not the logo printed bags. I've found numerous
>logo bags in antique stores, but have yet to find ONE print bag! Are
>they considered more rare? And is the reason I'm not finding them
>because they all got used in clothing, quilts, etc?
Nancy,
My mom (born 1921) says that they 'started' in the Depression, when
poor families needed every scrap of fabric they could get for making
clothing and quilts. The feed sack and flour sack people would make THEIR
brand more competitive by printing them with pretty designs, rather than
just muslin with the brand name. Some even printed their brand name in
water-soluable ink, so that the logo would disappear and leave a plain piece
of printed fabric, for making children's clothes or quilting! (in theory,
Mom said...in practice, you often got a 'ghost' of the logo left behind).
Hmmm...I remember seeing a big stack of feed sacks down at the flea
market that bought out the Overbrook Quilt Factory. Would anyone be
interested in taking a feed sack, sight unseen, if I went back and got some?
There were pretty patterns, but I'm not terribly into feedsacks, and I
thought, hey, with all these here, I can always come and get one later...
<G>
Jocelyn

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 15:35:22 -0500 (EST)
From: JOCELYNM@delphi.com
To: Baglady111@aol.com, qhl@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL:patterns in shops
Message-id: <01IGUI2CNFIK9ZPC1U@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

On 23-MAR-1997 09:43:48.0 Baglady111 said to JOCELYNM
> I have a question for a person just starting up a business..she needs
>to know..if she has her product, let's say it is a pattern, and you
>have placed them in shops..someone comes up to you and wants to buy
>one or some..is it ok
> to sell to her or do yu refer her to the shop (s)..
> 2nd if the shop is in CA and the buyer is in TN..do you sell to her or
> advise contacting the shop? I'd appreciate your input for the
>lady..Jane >>
Jane,
Depends on if it is one shop or many. If it's ONE, I would say she
needs to talk to the shop owner and work out an arrangement where neither of
them will feel ripped off.
If it's many shops, then each shop took the patterns knowing other
people were going to be selling them. So I think she should refer to a local
shop if there is one, or to a shop that ships nationwide, if there is one,
before she sells personally.
Jocelyn

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 17:06:40 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Print feedsacks
Message-ID: <970323170638_1882735897@emout17.mail.aol.com>

Jocelyn,

I'll bet if you went back and bought those feedsacks you would certainly find
buyers! Cut them up into various sizes; 5" or 6" charms, or something like
fat quarters. Depends on how much they want for them to begin with. Let us
know what you decide to do!

Nancy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 17:22:30 -0500 (EST)
From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Introduction from Nancy at CQSG
Message-Id: <2.2.16.19970323172037.2a475f2a@mail.albany.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi, gang! This post bounced for some reason so I am reposting it for Nancy.
Her E-mail address is narmstr@ibm.net. I E-mailed her and asked her to post
with more information on CQSG, and I will update our home page.

Kris

At 09:37 PM 3/19/97 -0800, you wrote:
>Hi ... "be brave, and jump in." I'm Nancy Cameron Armstrong, Chairperson
>of the Canadian Quilt Study Group and also Editor of the CQSG Newsletter
>COVER STORIES. We have over 300 members in 10 countries (about 1/3 in
>the USA).
>
>Noticed reference to Yuko Watanbe on today's messages, and thought
>it might not be widely know yet and of interest that tragically she has
>died quite suddenly. Only heard last Sunday morning (March 9)that she
>had died of cerebral apoplexy.
>
>I also noticed many references to book titles both old and new. As a
>VERY NEW subscriber, I hesitate to say anything until I get a better
>feel for the service; however ... I asked Cuesta Benberry, Barbara
>Brackman, Dorothy Cozart, Katy Christopherson, Virginia Gunn, Ruth
>McKendry, and Merikay Waldvogel each to provide "a list of the first 10
>titles you would buy (or if out-of-print, try to locate somewhere) if
>you were trying to build a collection for the study of quilts." Guide #1
>from CQSG is ... BUILDING A QUILT LIBRARY: TOP TEN TITLES FOR THE STUDY
>OF QUILTS FROM SEVEN QUILT HISTORIANS. Fascinating lists, mostly
>annotated.
>
>NCA (two miles north of the US border)
>British Columbia, Canada
>narmstr@ibm.net
>
>
>
>

------------------------------


Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 18:40:13 -0500 (EST)
From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>

At a house call today, I bought a *bunch* of feedsacks. A couple still have
their strings...is anyone interested in these? I paid $5 each and would be
happy to sell at that price to listmembers. Just so you can see what they
were like.

What surprised me is that these feedsacks - maybe not all of them, but
definitely these - have selvages. I suppose that is pretty obvious, but I
wonder how many feedsacks I have passed by over the years because I didn't
think feedsacks had selvages. Interesting.

Kris Driessen
oldquilt@albany.net


Proud owner of 15 new Roens!

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 19:25:07 -0500
From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Message from my past
Message-Id: <v01540b01af5b79bace79@[168.121.76.43]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Christine..in regards to your little nine patch doll quilt...

I think your little quilt was probably made between 1890 and 1920. I have
a quilt made in that time with much the same fabrics as you describe. My
aunt who was born in 1905 remembers one of the quilts being made from those
type fabrics. She said that in northern Michigan the pink prints were used
to make little pinafores to go over little girl's dresses and the blue
chambray was used for everyday shirts for men and boys. the shirting
stripes were for sunday shirts.

She gave me the quilt (for a double bed) and I treasure it, but won't use
it. I only display it as the fabrics are somewhat fragile. Fortunately my
aunt is still alive and very mentally alert so she has shared a lot of
family history that goes with that quilt!

Jean Ann Eitel
Editor, QUILT magazine
http://www.quiltmag.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 20:34:13 -0500 (EST)
From: Karen108@delphi.com
Jocelyn's right - and even when something's preserved in a tomb, it can
deteriorate, even while other objects buried on or with the same body survive.

Case in point: Eleanora of Toledo, wife of one of the Medici grand dukes, was
buried in her elaborate cut velvet wedding dress, linen undergarments, corset,
and stockings. The tomb was opened in the last few years and it was found
that the dress and stockings had survived, most of the corset and chemise were
gone, and the underdrawers were largely intact. There were also several
tombs of the princes of Saxony that were opened in the 19th century, and the
occupants' outer garments were by and large in good condition and the underwear
had disintegrated (some of the suits and gowns were sturdy enough to be
cleaned, worn and photographed on models! Carl Kovel's =Historic Costume in
Pictures= reprints the pictures).

It's why I *assume* that patchwork quilts were made in the 16th and early
17th century; the patterns existed, there's a surviving religious vestment
made to resemble bedclothes, and there are written references to patchwork at
both the beginning and the end of the century (a letter in 1507 from a French
tailor describing a patchwork banner he'd made, and a paragraph in =Gulliver's
Travels= about English patchwork). But until an actual quilt surfaces from
an English country house attic, I can't be *certain* that patchwork quilts as
opposed to patchwork garments or heraldric pieces were made.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 20:39:11 -0500 (EST)
From: Karen108@delphi.com
To: qhl@cuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Little doll quilt
Message-id: <01IGUSK1Z4YC9ZP3FO@delphi.com>
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

I'd find some compatible reproduction fabrics, put on a very simple border,
and use 100% cotton thread and a cotton batt to finish your little treasure.
Poly-core thread can cut through fabric but cotton should be fine.

What a lovely story. No one in family to my knowledge quilted, but I can
definitely relate to finding wonderful things while going through family
effects - last winter I found some pictures of my father as a teenager and my
mother as a high school senior. It really brought back the memories. Enjoy
the doll quilt - I think using it to cover your dolls is perfect.

Karen Evans

------------------------------

 

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 19:18:07 -0800 (PST)
From: Diane Lockwood <dcl@innercite.com>

Hi,

I clearly remember zip codes coming into being in 1964! I was a secretary
in a gov't office and we *had* to use the zips altho the rest of the world
did not! I even remember that we had to have 2 spaces between the fully
spelled out state before typing in the zip!! <VBG>

AAARRRUUUHHH! Awful memories!

Diane


Diane Lockwood in Pollock Pines, Calif
dcl@innercite.com

"What I do today is important because I am exchanging a day of my life for it."

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 22:26:47 -0500
From: "Jim Twigg" <jtwigg@radix.net>
To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com>
Xenia - I will be attending the Lancaster show and would like to e-mail you
regarding Legacy Quilts.
Please contact me @ jtwigg@radix.net
Thanks !
` Phyllis

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Mar 97 19:44:41 -0800
From: beth_novak@om.cv.hp.com


Item Subject: cc:Mail Text

I do have a feedsack that I know is from the fifties. It has lime 
green stripes and green poodles on leashes on the border! Looks just 
like the poodle skirts from the fifties. It was never used (no 
stitching on the top) and came out of the mill when it closed. 
Beth_Novak@om.cv.hp.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 05:08:02 -0500
From: quiltmag@mindspring.com (Jean Ann)


so, stop it already... LOL

if you guys dont stop making feed sacks sound so wonderful I will soon be
out there hunting for old feed sacks to start yet ANOTHER collection! Where
will I put them? I have not one itsy bitsy storage or shelf space left!

I word feed and flour sack dresses when I was a little girl. Did you?

Jean Ann Eitel
Editor, QUILT magazine
http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk
http://www.quilttalk.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 05:50:01 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com



Hi Phyllis..if you are coming to LANCASTER, PLEASE STOP BY and visit with THE
FEEDSACK CLUB as well..we are just one mile down the road from QHC..on the
same side of the road at HO JO'S..EVERYTHING IS FREE no fee to get in, free
demos, free quilt show, exhibits/show & tell..and we run from 9am til after
9pm or wheneve my crazy members decide to close it down..they'l be
buying/selling/trading their feedsacks..you never know who'll you see popping
in from up the road at the big show. We'd love to meet you..Jane of THE
FEEDSACK CLUB

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 05:55:52 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com



What you have were primarily used as a border skirt (like you mentioned) or
for curtains..nice little print for a young girls' window..the product was
most often sugar/salt/flour..anything that would/could sift thru..the thread
count was higher for that reason adn hence more like a percale..I'll bet it
is almsot as ncie as pillowcases you have on your bed now, huh?? The common
sack was more coarse..thread count was lower because it probably held beans,
nuts, apples, onions..larger items that did'nt sift thru..are you going to to
keep it? Sell it? Collect them?? Jane

I apologize if I did not explain who ANNA LUE COOK is..ANNA LUE, in my
estimation, wrote the book on feedsacks..she is a noted
collector/exhibitor/historian
and writer in the feedsack/cotton field..a charming lady who is a wealth of
info and constantly researching our subject..and my FEEDSACK CLUB can proudly
claim her as one of my 700 members..if you don't mind me asking, where are
you from..we will be having several exhibits thru out the country this
year..would be nice if one was near you..we fully realize feedsacks are'nt
for everyone..but they are an important part of our textile history..millions
of people would have had NOTHING if it had'nt been for feedsacks..theyused
them for everything in your house that is made ffrom fabric, slipcovers,
sheets, towels, undies, swimsuits, diapers, (kotex) mens clothing, bras, and
the list goes on..if it wasn't for feedsacks, you'd hve had millions of
people NAKED!! NOT A PRETTY SITE!! Jane

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 97 03:23:36 -0800
From: beth_novak@om.cv.hp.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com

Item Subject: cc:Mail Text

I don't know what it is about them, but I think I'm hooked! I have 
several of the coarse weave ones that I thought were coarse because 
they were older. Thanks to Joan I now know why there is so much 
textural difference. The green poodles and another one I have that is 
white but with a great wide blue floral border are of very fine 
fabric. The blue one looks almost like an oversized pillowcase!

I started buying them to replace hopeless areas in old quilts, but I 
find I have a very hard time cutting one up. I have yet to overcome 
that hesitation!

I have a few that are already opened and washed, and I stand in front 
of the mirror with one wrapped around, modelling my imaginary feedsack 
skirt!

These feedsacks were recently unknown to me. Even my parents (raised 
in the city and from rather well off families) don't remember calico 
feedsacks. Perhaps my grandparents might but they are already 
departed. Feedsack clothing may have been a sign of poverty or being 
from the country but I bet they made great dresses for little girls!

Beth_Novak@om.cv.hp.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 06:38:02 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com



well, Jean Ann..we'd love to have you out there collecting/quilting..it's
great fun and FEEDSACKS ARE HOT!! My 700 members will tell you that..not bad
for starting this club in '89 with 5/6 quilters..and maybe I should explain a
little about the club.
this is a hobby for myself and my publisher of our newsletter..we take
nothing from the club..infact sometimes my lecture fees go into the till..THE
FEEDSACK CLUB is an informational group who buy/sell/trade among
themselves..but we also exhibit and do ongoing research on feedsacks..an
EXTREMELY IMPORTANT part of ur textile history..MILLIONS of families dressed
in feedsack..the fabric is as important as regular cottons, wools, denim.
velvet, dotted swiss, etc..it's just been passed over..till NOW!! I'll tell
you how HOT!! THEY ARE..they have reproduced them..if they were'nt
saleable..would they BOTHER?? hardley..we love to share the info on
them..and I am so grateful for all opportunities to NOT A PROFIT
organization..so when you see THE FEEDSACK CLUB..it isn''t for $$$$..so jump
in with us Jean Ann..always room for one more..and if you are coming to the
big show in Lancaster in April..come see us.numerous quilt mag editors drop
in..


FOR BETH NOVAK..they do look like a pillowcase..except they usually measure
aobut 34 or 36 x 42..depending on the size bag..there was no weights and
measures back then so the bags were judged by the amount of content they
held..a barrel size bag would weigh 296 lbs, a half barrel weighed 98 lbs.,
48 or 49 lbs bags were equuvalent to 1/4 barrel..and so on..
People who lived deep into the country (far from town) thougght nothing at
all of wearing feedsack or using it for household items..EVERYONE wore
it..used it..so how would they know they were poor..BUT if you lived near
town, on the edge..and had contact with the town people..then there was a
stigma..is''nt that common with many things today? If a room is filled with
people with blonde hair and a brunette walks in..if everyone has a classic
book to read and someone is sitting there with a comic book??? yesterday
they wore certain fabrics that designated 'wealth'..today it's labels..

Yes, they did make great dresses for little girls..,they would also have a
matching scarf possibly for their head, matching panties, heire petticoat..a
doll dressed just like them.matched and dolley would have a matching
blanket..the girls dressed from the 'big stores''like MONTGOMERY WARD/SEARS
ROEBUCK..didnt have that touch..there were even contests like we have with
FAIRFIELD today.. 
Beth..don't feel bad if you can'[t bring yourself to cutting into the
bag..we have plenty in our club that have already cut theirs..hundreds of
members who deal in all sizes of bags and we'll be happy to furnish you with
what you need..anthing from full size sacks to squares in inches..we'll help
you out..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 97 04:32:28 -0800
From: beth_novak@om.cv.hp.com


Item Subject: cc:Mail Text

I've just sent my dues in to the Feedsack Club, and I'm really excited 
about being a member! I sure wish I could attend your get together. 
I'm way out here in Oregon, though. If I know about it ahead of time, 
maybe I can attend next year. 
I'm going to try to get the "Drifted Snow" logo scanned so I can send 
a photo of this handsome blond farmer to people on this list who are 
interested.
Beth_Novak@om.cv.hp.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 07:47:14 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com


MAKE SURE you send to Anna..she is TOPS IN THE FEEDSACK INFO department..and
VERY HELPFUL..she will have a month long exhibit in TN in Oct..and will be
there one week-end..inturn we'll have a small convention..(yes, another one)
but this one is SOOOO extra special..
She will be an excellent source for you to work with on anything you need to
know..
Did I ask you before WHERE in OR you are? I will be in CA lecturing in OCT
and HOPE to get up into OR..there have also been a few inquires of doing a
lecture up your way..we're working on dates..and they'll be FEEDSACK
LECTURES/TRUNK SHOW..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 09:18:30 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com

What are UFO's in relation to quilts?

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 09:26:41 -0500 (EST)
From: KBoxmeyer@aol.com


I would possibly be interested in a sack or two. I don't know what kind of
$$ I would be commited to spending though. 

Beginner collector Kimberly

------------------------------

Date: 24 Mar 97 10:13:28 EST
From: "Patricia L. Lyons" <72134.3643@CompuServe.COM>
To: Jane <Baglady111@aol.com>

Jane,
ZIP Codes were implemented in 1961 - it's one very effective way of dating
something with an address on it. If it has a ZIP Code, it is 1961 or later. If
it doesn't, it's pre-1962. Notice the slight overlap.
Although the change to ZIP Codes was announced a year or so earlier, there was
very fierce resistance to it - It was a "Commie plot", that sort of thing. This
resistance continued even after implementation until the Post Office made good
on its threat to treat all mail without ZIP Codes as undeliverable. By 1963 use
of ZIP Codes, particularly on mail, was pretty universal.
I cannot overstate the resistance implementing this change encountered. The
fierceness of that resistance makes is so much easier to date something with an
address on it.

Pat Lyons 

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 11:10:51 -0500 (EST)
From: Baglady111@aol.com


NO CHARGE for you..not for all the help you';ve given me..I just need to know
how you are going to use them..if you want to trade with others..if so..what
size? etc..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 97 12:32:31 PST
From: John & Cinda Cawley <cawley@epix.net>


Many of the church quilting groups in this area of Northeastern PA make 
whole cloth quilts using "Cuddleskin," the fabric shiny on one side and 
fuzzy on the other from which Barbizon robes and nightgowns are made. Is 
this a regionalism or do quilters in other places also use "Cuddleskin"? 
A friend called me this morning to say she has a source for the fabric and 
wondered if anyone on the net was interested.
Cinda in Scranton
-------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 15:12:40 -0500
From: "Miklos B. Lukacs" <mlukacs@webbernet.net>

I remember during WW-2. Everything was rationed. Lots of people raised 
their own chickens, pigs and at least one cow. The material for 
clothing was also rationed. In order to save food stamps, clothing 
stamps etc. you bought the feed for the animals where they gave the best 
feedsacks. Now one of the mills near our town in southeast Mich. must 
have bought out the mill (material) in yellow feedsacks printed with 
white daisy looking flowers. Our neighbor had a lot of animals. She 
had every piece of furniture, her car seats, her husbands tractor seat, 
lampshades -anything you could think of covered with white on yellow 
material. All this talk of feedsacks has reminded me of that time. Do 
you believe 50 years ago!! Connie L.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 16:44:31 -0500
From: Leo Harvill <harvill@Access.ETSU-Tn.Edu>

I am interested in historic information concerning cigarette silks, 
cigar flannels, and cigar ribbons and the quilts that contain them.

I am particularly interested in quilts that contain cigar flannels 
with flags on them.

In the context of these premiums, I am also interested in the history 
of tobacco marketing.

Thanks in advance for any references or leads you can provide.

Leo M. Harvill
Johnson City, Tennessee

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 18:05:38 -0500 (EST)
From: AJSNGS@aol.com


Hi,

Have any of you heard of a book called "Voices from the Past" by Kaye
England? I think it is fairly new, and I read that it was quite good. I'd
like to hear more about it if anyone knows anything.

Thanks,

Nancy in VA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 18:00:54 -0500 (EST)
From: JZgliniec@aol.com
To: QHL@cue.com



I have never seen or heard of "cuddleskin".....I have not seen a quilt made
from it either. I'm not up on designer robes .....mine is pretty ratty.

It is not present in Southern Calf. to my knowledge. 

This causes me to ponder other possible "regionalisms". With information so
widely available, there are not many regional styles left.

Regards,
Julia..Poway, CA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 19:28:33 -0500 (EST)
From: narmstr@ibm.net (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ <

This note is being forwarded at the request of some list members. 
THE CANADIAN QUILT STUDY GROUP

Goals and Policies
The CQSG is an organization dedicated to encourage and to advance study
and research about quiltmakers, quiltmaking, and quilts. In addition,
the members work for the promotion of contemporay quilts and the
preservation of historical quilts through cooperative action with guilds
and appropriate provincial, state, and federal institutions. The medium
of communication is the quarterly, COVER STORIES. Biennial seminars are
held, in conjunction with Quilt Canada, giving both members and others
the opportunity to share in papers, slide presentations, and informal
discussion. The research papers are published in PATCHWORDS. (The papers
presented at the 4th Biennial Seminar May 31, 1996 in Saskatoon will be
published after the 5th Biennial Seminar May 29, 1998 in Vancouver.)

Membership in CQSG is open to individuals, guilds, institutions,
organizations, and businesses. Although CQSG is primarily concerned with
Canadian quilts and quiltmakers, in harmony with the late 20th century
quilt movement, interests and memberships are international. Annual
benefits of membership include: the quarterly, a MEMBERSHIP ROSTER, and
use of the CQSG library.

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP: $15.00 Individual ($5.00 added postage to overseas
addresses); Guild $50.00
PATRON MEMBERSHIP: $50.00 Supporting, $250.00 Corporate Sponsor, $500.00
Corporate Patron.
All memberships of $50.00, or more, include a copy of the reasearch
papers. Logo pins: $6.00 plus $1.00 p/h. Cheques to: CQSG, 1109 160A
St., White Rock, BC V4A 7G9

The policy statement is a bit "dry," but our newsletter certainly is
not! It runs 26 to 28 densely packed pages (no ads) of diverse articles,
member news, reports on international conferences and seminars, updates
on international heritage projects, write-ups of exhibitions, AND
extensive book reviews - 10 pages in the January 1996 issue. These are
CRITICAL reviews, unlike the typical quilt magazines which love every
book published. We receive and review copies of ALL books published by
AQS, C&T, That Patchwork Place, The Quilt Digest, Quilt House
Publishing, and all other trade and academic publishers' quilt-related
titles on request. The newsletter is what holds us together, for we meet
in person only infrequently.

A small group of twenty-seven held our first tentative meeting May
1989, to consider forming a Canadian organization similar to the
American Quilt Study Group. One year later, May 1990 we had our First
Biennial Seminar with over 100 in attendance. Currently, we have
325 members representative of all 10 Canadian provinces and both
territories, and a total of 10 countries world-wide. For more
information about CQSG and a lovely photo of our logo, see Karen
O'Dowd's column p.15 QUILTER'S NEWSLETTER MAGAZINE June 1995, and
TRADITIONAL QUILTER November 1996, pages 5-7 of "The Guilded
Newsletter." We also have a web page at
http://ttsw.com/History/CanadianQuiltStudy.html

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 17:27:17 -0800
From: Sharon Harleman Tandy <harleman@micron.net>

Hello all, could "Cuddleskin" be what we've called brushed nylon (or
acetate or whatever) here in the Northwest? Used for nighties, etc?
Sharon.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 19:28:29 -0500 (EST)
From: all <all@idt.net> (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ

I have a question which is not strictly related to old quilts, but I know 
there are several experts who read this list and I'm looking for some 
expert advice.

I have recently acquired some very nice silk thread and I've tried hand 
quilting with it. It is just wonderful! Smooth as it can be and I can 
do really tiny stitches with it. However, I've heard that silk thread 
should not be used to quilt cotton quilts. What do you think? Is this a 
real, true no no, or is this a rumor started by the quilt police? 

Can someone who knows about fabric and thread -- cotton and silk -- let 
me know if using this thread will result in eventual damage to my quilts? 
If so, how soon would deterioration set in? I'd love to use this 
thread, but. . . 

HELP and TIA,

Adelaide

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 21:04:32 -0500 (EST)
From: BBMorris@aol.com

Yes! I wore dresses made from feed and flour sacks too. Not all of my
dresses were made from them but some of them were made for me by my
grandmother. I can clearly remember two of them that were my favorites when
I was in the 5th grade. I still have some of my grandmother's aprons made
from them. You just can't wear them out. 

Barbara in GA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Mar 1997 21:24:52 -0500 (EST)
From: JOCELYNM@delphi.com


On 24-MAR-1997 13:39:06.0 KBoxmeyer said to JOCELYNM
> What are UFO's in relation to quilts?
Un-Finished Objects.

You know, those projects you start, and never get around to finishing....<G>
Jocelyn

--------------------------

 

Date: Mon, 31 Mar 1997 21:32:33 -0500 (EST)

From: narmstr@ibm.net (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ

<qrs@mail.albany.net>)

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Cigar Ribbons

Way back on Mar 27 & 29, Julia Zgliniec and Audrey Waite shared items about

Pabst Blue Ribbon. In 1990 the Yakima Valley [WA] Museum had a marvellous

exhibit QUILTS WEST. Unfortunately, the little catalogue has no

illustrations but ... how well, I remember the exhibit and the cigar silk

and Pabst Blue Ribbon items.

        A Cigar Silk SMOKING JACKET?!?!?! Found in a trunk with bits of tobacco

still clinging to the silk. Likely quilter and seamstress with Vyrona

Cummins Efflinger who lived with her farmer husband south of Walla Walla.

The Pabst Blue Ribbon quilt was purchased at a flea market for ... oh, no!

$.25 (no, folks I have NOT put the decimal point in the wrong place).

Catalogue includes explanation re: ribbons, used in bottle labelling

between 1895 until about 1916 when WWI diverted their manufacture. Woven of

a good quality silk, these ribbons usually survive in good condition.

Ribbons 6" long, compound folded, stitched into position by manufacturer.

Beer bottle corked, cork covered with foil, ribbon glued in place over foil

with printing centered in front and ends trailing about 1 inch. This silk

ribbon was the forerunner of the paper neck label.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 31 Mar 1997 21:53:04 -0700

From: "Shari K. Jaster" <sjaster@ix.netcom.com>

To: "by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ <qrs@mail.albany.net>"

<Taymor5@aol.com>

CC: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Civil War Quilts

by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ wrote: am giving a presentation to a

group of junior high students. The topic is: How Quilts Document the Civil

War era. I am particularly interested in quilts used in soldier burials,

the use of quilts regarding the underground railroad and quilts made by

slaves and former slaves.

        I am doing a research project on the above topics. I would appreciate a

copy of any post you send to the above person privately. Otherwise, if you

post to this list, I will retrieve it here. I was on the brink of asking

these same questions on this list! TIA Shari sjaster@ix.netcom.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 06:40:24 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrett@fast.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Civil War Quilts

        Two posts have been sent to the list asking for information -- Please send

answers to the list and not privately. This second post reinforces the

teacher- in- me belief that if one person asks a question, at least 5 other

students in the class want/need the answer. Expanding this thinking to the

list, there are probably 200 people who want to hear the answer. Please

post quilt answers to the list, and please don't ask for answers to quilt

questions to be posted privately, so the list can continue to be a sharing

experience. Thank you. Living near Gettysburg, and in the midst of

Underground Railroad paths, I too am interested in this information. Thanks

for considering my opinion and request. Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrett@fast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 08:58:49 -0500 (EST)

From: Mary <maryk@psln.com> (by way of Quilting Heritage ListServ

<qrs@mail.albany.net>)

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Cleaning question

I heard you are great folks to help out! I have a quilt my grandmother made

me in 1962. I has two yellow "stains" on it. These were not spills that I

know of, since I have kept it packed away. I cannot wash the stains out.

Any idea of what they are or how I might get them out?

Other than these stains, the quilt looks brand new. Thank you for any help

you may offer.

Mary Pacatte Westwood, California

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 09:41:56 -0500 (EST)

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Civil War Quilts

Happy April Fool's Day, everyone~~ Here is a forward of a message I had

saved from the "early days" of QHL. (This was before the terrible fire at

Terry Thompson's apartment). Thought it might be of interest with the

current thread of discussion. Karan

<<Subj: QHL: New book by Barbara Brackman

Date:   96-12-20 23:46:55 EST

From:   holmr@execpc.com (R D)

Resent-from:    QHL@cue.com

To:     QHL@cue.com

Hi All,

The following letter was posted to another quilting group that I belong to.

I thought the information would be interesting to our group, so I asked

Julie for permission to reprint it. Julie said yes. It turns out she's a

new member of our group! Lucky us!! Welcome Julie!

        She is also going to pass on information about our group's existance to

Barbara Brackman. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could get her online with

us?!! I am definately interested in this new book. I'm sure that others

will be too so, Julie, please keep us posted.

Donna in Wisconsin

Here's Julie's letter:

From: Julie Swords <julies@KUHUB.CC.UKANS.EDU>

Subject: Civil War Quilt Book (long)

Hello from the frozen Plains!

Just wanted to share with IQ'ers some tidbits from our local guild's

meeting Tuesday. IQ member Karla Menaugh was also in attendance. We had a

good time even if it was about 10 degrees outside, not counting the effects

of a brisk wind.

        Instead of the usual monthly guest expert we all shared recent projects

and Christmas presents in one long show and tell. This was made especially

interesting because two of our guild members, Barbara Brackman and Terry

Thompson, showed all the quilts they have just had photographed for their

upcoming book on Civil War Quilts. The quilts made especially for this book

are based on Civil War quilts made both in the north and south. Some of the

new quilts were made by area guild members; others were made by other

talented women all around the country. The new quilts were all on hand at

once here in Lawrence, Kansas, because the photography for the book was

done here the week before. So, lucky us, we got to see them all up close.

        The book will show and tell all about the various kinds of quilts made

around the time of the Civil War. Included will be at least 20 projects

with full instructions. All the project quilts are directly based on quilts

typical of the time. Some are pieced only; some feature wonderful applique

designs.

        Barbara has been researching and lecturing about this subject for some

time so she has a tremendous base of knowledge. There will also be a great

amount of historical background about what kind of quilts were made, how

they were used, the colors and fabrics, how political sentiments were often

prominently featured in the design through words and art, etc.

        The guild has heard Barbara's talks on the subject and the stories are

fascinating so the book should be great as well. If you have ever heard

Barbara lecture, you know she is as interested in telling about the people

who made the quilts and their stories as she is about describing the quilts

themselves.

        She said her copy deadline comes up right after Christmas and the book is

tentatively scheduled to be published in October. I don't know who the

publisher is. If any of you have a particular interest in this era of

quilting let me know and I'll post more details as I learn them.

        We were also privileged to see three very, very old quilts Terry is in the

process of appraising. They are so old, in such incredibly great shape, and

feature such remarkable quilting techniques that the process of appraisal

will take some time. One of the quilts dates from around 1820. From a

distance it looks like it has a rose-colored floral fabric border about 10

inches wide. However, Terry says the border was stamped on with the red ink

and huge wooden stamps, one stamp block at a time around the outside of the

quilt. The other two were probably from right after the Civil War. The

intricate quilting designs (many of them trapunto-stuffed) were

breath-taking. The quilts have been passed down through a family so the

makers are known...isn't that nice for a change?!

        I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season! Best wishes from Julie

Swords in very, very cold northeast Kansas>>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 10:03:23 -0500 (EST)

From: JZgliniec@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Beer Ribbons

Thank you for the information and background on the Blue Ribbons. I

treasure every little gem of information that fills in even one small piece

of the big puzzle.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 10:38:15 -0500

From: "J. G. Row" <judygrow@blast.net>

To: "Quilt History Digest" <QHL-Digest@cue.com>

Subject: Bride's Bouquet

        Last night I put the last ladder stitch into the binding of the antique

Bride's Bouquet quilt top that I heavily hand quilted. I started quilting

it in the beginning of October! DH wants to put it on our bed immediately!

It is so spring-like!

        However, yesterday we had 4" of wet, heavy snow, which weighted down the

daffodills that were already bloomin, and the forsythia too.

         This quilt top is almost entirely BRIGHT yellow solids (two of them) and

greens, with some muslin, lavender, and red/pink prints. It is so joyful it

might melt the snow!

         Who said to use yellow in moderation! This quilt uses the brighter yellow

in 3" sashing, and the lighter yellow for the 6" border (an afterthought, I

am sure, after the piecer ran out of the original yellow). The bouquet

handles and every other leaf/petal as well as the setting

squares are green. The 3 alternate petals are either lavender, pink/red

print (one block has bright chrome orange petals) or print on white.

Background for the blocks is muslin.

        Now I've got to get another antique top quickly basted and ready to go.

Can't be without a hand quilting project for more than a couple of days. I

go into withdrawal!

        DH and I are off to the Brandywine Museum today to see the quilt show.

Will report tomorrow.   Judy in NJ judygrow@blast.net

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 11:21:25 -0600 (CST)

From: Nancy Evans <nevans@nebnet.net>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Embroidered quilts

Yesterday, I purchased a set of Sunbonnet Girls embroidery quilt blocks

(new, not vintage). These are unfinished, of course & I am looking for

suggestions for finishing. I am leaning toward chain-stitching the entire

design in black. I am attempting a look commemorating the start of

Sunbonnets, which "I think" was maybe the 1920's. So, would red or black be

best? Open to suggestions! TIA! Nancy Evans - Nebraska Quilter

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 15:37:28 -0500

From: "Lesley" <lesleyl@islc.net>

To: <QHL@cuenet.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Civil War Quilts

There is a book called "Stitched From The Soul" Slave Quilts from the

Ante-Bellum South by Gladys-Marie Fry. This book came out several years ago

in conjunction with a quilt exhibit at the Museum of American Folk Art in

NYC. The last time I was in NY, the museum's book store still had copies.

Lesley lesleyl@islc.net

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 15:26:16 -0500 (EST)

From: SadieRose@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Sunbonnet girls

I have a book called "A Meeting of the Sunbonnet Children" by Betty J.

Hagerman, self-published in 1979. Betty created a quilt that is a sampler

of different types of Sunbonnet girls & Farmer boys (to use generic names).

I am going to pull out a few bits of information, but if you are really

interested, try to find a copy. There are approx. 40 pages of detailed info

on the sunbonnet type patterns, when & where they appeared in print, with

sketches of the different styles. Some full size patterns given in the

second half of the book. I believe that I read that Betty Hagerman had

passed away, and I don't know if the book is still available.

         Her research indicated that the Sunbonnet craze is probably attributable

to Bertha Corbett, an American artist who created her simple but adorable

line drawings of little girls at work & play, in oversize sunbonnets, in

answer to a challenge that "emotion could not be shown without faces".

Bertha Corbett was surely familiar with the similar drawings of Kate

Greenaway, an English artist who illustrated children's books in the 1880's

& '90's. Kate Greenaway's drawings appear on many Victorian Crazy Quilts,

with the design stitched in outline stitch (embroidery). The magazine

editors were quite disgusted to find that women were only stitching the

outlines- they had intended for the interiors to be filled with stitching,

too.

         Bertha Corbett's sunbonnet babies started as designs for Valentine &

Christmas cards and notes. They were then compiled into a book. After this,

Miss Corbett was asked to illustrate a new textbook for children "The

Sunbonnet Babies Primer" published apprx. 1900. More Sunbonnet Babies books

followed. Advertisers also sought to use these popular designs to sell

their products.

         A second, lesser known illustrator also used the "sunbonnet babies" for

post cards and posters. His name was Bernhardt Wall. The popularity of the

sunbonnet babies created a demand, which in turn created what we could call

"spin offs" or "knock offs" today. Bernhardt Wall chose to have 2

distinctions to make his sunbonnet babies identifiable as his work: they

have a white bonnet with a ruffled brim on one end, and a high crown on the

other, almost reversible, except for the flounce at the lower back. And,

the dresses and coats with well-defined waistlines were a bright red. Many

others also adapted these popular designs.

         As mothers today turn popular "characters" into quilt motifs...mothers at

the turn of the century did so with the sunbonnet babies. Marie Webster, in

her 1915 book "Quilts, Their Story and How to Make Them" includes a

sunbonnet quilt. Ladies Art Company, a well known pattern source, added

sunbonnet patterns to their line "somewhere between 1900-1915" but they

were gone from the catalog by 1923.

         The Sunbonnets continued to appear in pattern catalogs and newspaper

patterns into the 1940s. The patterns, which were often embroidered in an

outline stitch at first, now were simplified to adapt to applique. One

comment was that in the older patterns, the girl's dresses were longer, and

by the 30's, they were shorter, as fashions had changed...but I wouldn't

use that for quilt dating purposes.

Hope this gives you a little background information on the Sunbonnet Girls.

Karan from warm but windy Iowa

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 17:46:19 -0500 (EST)

From: Quiltfix@aol.com

To: qhl@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Australians, help!

This question is for the Australians on the list. Last night, when I was

looking at the calendar, I noticed a holiday this month called ANZAC Day

(Australia and New Zealand), I think it's on the 25th. My mom and I figure

that the first three letters stood for Aust. and N.Z., but what about the

AC? Help! Alan

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 18:00:23 -0500 (EST)

From: Baglady111@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Australians, help!

In a message dated 97-04-01 17:52:20 EST, you write:

<< Last night, when I was looking at the calendar, I noticed a holiday this

month called ANZAC Day (Australia and New Zealand), I think it's on the

25th. My mom and I figure that the first three letters stood for Aust. and

N.Z., but what about the AC? Help! Alan >>

AIR CONDITIONING..APRIL FOOL..ANONYMOUS

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 01 Apr 1997 21:22:12 -0400

From: Peter James Robson <robsonpj@ra.isisnet.com>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Nova Scotias Heritage Quilt Project

Ellen and QHL,

I am the co-convenor of the Nova Scotia Heritage Quilt Project and we would

be very interested in helping you find out about your quilt and the

signatures. We have had a registry day in Middleton and some of the names

you mentioned should be relatively easy to trace as the Mayflower

Handquilters have a chapter in that area. Please e-mail me and I will send

you a documentation form. We have registered quite a few signature quilts

from all over the province, as we register them we also write down all the

names. we have a very good Provincial Archives here.    We are very interested

in finding Nova Scotia quilts that have ended up in other corners of the

world and as well we would like to share the information we have on quilts

that are here "from away". Of particular interest is a Crazy Quilt we

registered from Connecticut. Does anyone know if they have done a Quilt

Registry? Thanks for all your kind words on our web page and the book "Old

Nova Scotian Quilts". Barbara Robson in snowy, cold Nova

Scotia------------------------------

Date: Tue, 01 Apr 1997 20:27:35 -0500

(EST)From: JOCELYNM@delphi.comTo: nevans@nebnet.net, QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Embroidered quilts

On 1-APR-1997 12:29:48.7 nevans said to JOCELYNM > Yesterday, I purchased a

set of Sunbonnet Girls embroidery quilt blocks (new, not vintage). These

are unfinished, of course & I am looking for suggestions for finishing. >

IMO, I think stem stitch would be more authentic. My mommy, a 'vintage'

quiltmaker of the era <G> taught me to embroider, and to her stem or

outline stitch IS embroidery (lazy daisy loops, and french knots being the

other two stitches). Pastels were really important in quilting then, as was

the use of a wide range of colors (think double wedding ring and Grandma's

Flower Garden). I would bet that a quilter of the era would have made each

block a different color, with black and red NOT being among them, but

instead paler colors. Jocelyn------------------------------

Date: Tue, 1 Apr 1997 21:02:56 -0500

(EST)From: bpeck <pkrhdcar@erols.com> (by way of Quilting Heritage

ListServ<qrs@mail.albany.net>)

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Unidentified subject!

Hello,

This is the second time I have tried to get through. I am looking for any

information concerning a 'Square's pattern'. According to an author of a

play being presented in our area a 'Rebel Square' is referred to! Has

anyone ever heard of this or anything similar to that name?I would greatly

appreciate any help? Thank you Rose in

Norfolk

--------------------------------